Purchasing a Pre-Construction Home, NEED ADVICE

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bac Bradley, Mar 7, 2002.

  1. Bac Bradley

    Bac Bradley Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok guys, I'm considering purchasing a new single family home pre-construction in the coming year. Typically builders in this area throw in a finished basement for signing a contract early, which they value at around 9k.

    I have big plans for the basement - I plan on building my ManRoom down there complete with theater, bar and lounge area, and video game/tv area. IF the builder finishes the ManRoom, I won't be able to wire everything the way I'd want it, BUT I'd be throwing away that cash.

    What would you do? Go for the ManRoom from scratch or take the builders finished basement for no additional cost? -Dan
     
  2. Karen Maraj

    Karen Maraj Agent

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    Can't you tell them to credit you $9000 for other upgrades in the house? I know that I plan on doing that with the carpet that they lay, tell them to credit me with other upgrades cuz I want to do the hardwood floors myself.
     
  3. Bac Bradley

    Bac Bradley Stunt Coordinator

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    My initial inquiry was negative - the "special" was a finished basement and it was a set deal. I could dig into it more though.
     
  4. Colin Dunn

    Colin Dunn Supporting Actor

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    If the only thing you want to add is wiring, then see if the builder will let you add wiring upgrades to their finished basement deal, or alternatively, see if they will let you add the wiring you want before the drywall goes up.

    Other things about the finished basement may be adaptable - such as adding in plumbing rough-in for a wet bar and bathroom. They may offer to sell you options to put in a counter and cabinets.

    Since they give you the finished basement for free, I'd take them up on that, then retrofit that finished space. The other option would be to refuse the upgrade, but then you're out additional money to finish it. Compare the cost of adapting their finished basement vs. doing everything on your own...
     
  5. Bac Bradley

    Bac Bradley Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah what I need to do is get the blueprint for the space and see where plumbing/wiring could go - then work with the builder to see what they can do. I haven't chosen exactly what I want down there anyways, it's all rough ideas at this point. Part of me wants to hire a professional theater designer to "do it right", but the other part of me says "how will you ever afford that?" [​IMG] Regardless, one way or another I'll get this ManRoom done.
     
  6. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    Bac,

    Who's the builder? Will they let you bring a professional in to pre-wire the space? It is highly unlikely that they'll let a prospective homeowner do the wiring. Not only do you not have general liability insurance but my guess is that you don't know the NEC guidelines, local building codes and proper wiring guidelines. I understand that you haven't mentioned a DIY job, just letting you know that you have about a 0% chance if that's the route you pursue. Get a professional on your side with the proper credentials and you stand a much better chance. Regards.
     
  7. Bac Bradley

    Bac Bradley Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks, yes I would have a professional do all the wiring. I like DIY jobs, but thats just a wee bit out of my league [​IMG]
     
  8. Bob Schumann

    Bob Schumann Extra

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    Another possible consideration may be to let the foundation cure before starting the project. If it's a poured concrete foundation you may get some condensation on the walls the first summer. We actually had small puddles along some of the walls from this affect. Waiting a year or two before doing the work may be prudent. This could depend upon what part of the country you're in too. I know in NW Ohio it's almost required to wait at least 2 years or you could be in for trouble.
     

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