Protecting Your HT Investment

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Colton, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. Colton

    Colton Supporting Actor

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    What is required to protect your home theater in case of a natural disaster, fire or theft? Those of you who have invested thousands of dollars in equipment - do you write down each and every serial/model number to each piece of equipment (with photos) and store this information off-site? Also, if you have built a dedicated home theater - should you tell your insurance agent and invite him/her over for a walk-thru/review? Basically, what is needed to make sure your home theater investment is protected?

    - Colton
     
  2. wayne-sun

    wayne-sun Agent

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    With my policy it's like jewelery, if you want anything more than basic coverage you have to supply receipts and purchase extra coverage. The cost of the extra coverage varies depending on if you want replacement cost or depreciated value for replacement. Most people in the face of a disaster, whether flood, fire or theft will find they are under insured. I have a CD with digital pictures of everything in my house with all the serial numbers and purchase dates/prices in my safe deposit box just in case.
     
  3. drobbins

    drobbins Screenwriter

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    I recently had my theater destroyed by a broken water filter. Basement Theater I have replacement insurance, so the actual cost to replace the items is covered. I first received the depreciation value, I received the remainder after I gave them the receipts. The main issue I ran into was the equipment still working. My 4805 projector had water running through it for hours. It still worked so they did not want to replace it. I took it to repair shop and they said that it already had corrosion & recommended it be replaced. The insurance co. still said no. I asked that the issue be arbitrated. They said that would cost them more than the projector value, so they replaced it.
    I think it is a great idea to take pictures of you theater and equipment. A good place to store them is in the HTF Gallery [​IMG]
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    An important point: take a video camera and run it slowly over your DVD and CD collection. Add up the replacement cost and check your policy. Many times an insurance company has a cap of $1-2,000 for stuff like this. A bunch of $49 video games and $25 DVDs can actually be more than your equipment.

    True story: years ago some friends of our had a small fire. In addition to the paint and structural changes, they told the insurance company they had lost nearly 2 bookshelves worth of paperbacks. "Fine" was their response. "We will pay to replace them, but you have to tell us the titles." (How many of you keep lists like this around?)

    Then take the video tape and store it off site. At your work would be fine or at a relatives house.
     

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