Pronto Neo Vs. TSU1000

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brian AM, Aug 19, 2002.

  1. Brian AM

    Brian AM Stunt Coordinator

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    I just purchased a Neo from BB this weekend. I paid $200 for the thing and decided to try it out during the 30 day return period. The remote seems decent enough, it has a hard time picking up some of the commands from the AVP 9080 Newcastle Preamp...but after a few hundred read attempts I think I got it to work. Other than that, my only other complaint is the blocky resolution of the icons and their 4 shade color scheme.

    My question is for those of you who own TSU1000s and TSU2000s, do you find the resolution/and or grayscale depth to be more acceptable? and money being equal, with new vs. used market scenario, would you choose a used TSU2000 over the Neo? I also noticed the database of icons and setup files over at remotecentral.com was ENORMOUS for the older Prontos.

    Is the only real advantage of the neo the set of directional hard buttons on its face?

    Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Jim Lenneman

    Jim Lenneman Stunt Coordinator

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    Brian,

    I've never owned or even seen the Neo so take that into account when reading my opinion.

    I don't think that you'll find much if any advantage to screen display/resolution on a 1000/2000. I've never loved the blue/green Pronto display. That's why I upgraded to color. The real advantage is the available memory, screen size, programming flexability, and as you mentioned the enormous user base at remotecentral.com.

    The 2000 can be had new for as low as 199.95 (at etronics.com I think) but that doesn't include a charger base (not absolutely necessary). Refurbs can be had cheaper, try ebay.

    I think the only real advantage to the Neo is as you mentioned, the hard directional pad and maybe the form factor.

    Jim L
     
  3. Dave E H

    Dave E H Supporting Actor

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    IMHO you don't want the charger base. get your own rechargeables or use regular batteries. Regular cheap alkalines last a long time in my Pronto
     
  4. Brian AM

    Brian AM Stunt Coordinator

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    Well one vote for the older more stately Pronto... [​IMG] Anyone else?
     
  5. Brian AM

    Brian AM Stunt Coordinator

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    Along the same lines, how does the MX-500 or MX-700 compare to the NEO or pronto? I realize the soft button creation cannot be accomplished with the MX series, however, what is the purpose of the LCD screen at the top of the remote? Can those buttons be labeled by the user, then IR codes from another remote be sent to them?

    I do find the several pages worth of soft buttons for a remote to be a bit inconvenient.....
     
  6. Jim Lenneman

    Jim Lenneman Stunt Coordinator

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    Funny you should ask. I also happen to own the MX-500. Bought it recently for my wife to use upstairs on a much smaller setup. It's a great hard button remote, easy to program etc, etc. My wife was using the old Pronto, but doesn't like the non-color touchscreens. The LCD is for labeling the 10 buttons along the side of the screen. You have a 5 character limit. These buttons can also (in addition) hold a macro, which you access by holding the button for 1 sec. These macros are not device dependent however, they do the same routine regardless of what gear is running.

    While it's a great remote, there's really no comparison to a Pronto. Much, much less flexible in programming. The decision point is whether or not you like touch screens. If not, the MX-500 is probably the best there is at anywhere close to it's price point.

    Jim L
     
  7. Brian AM

    Brian AM Stunt Coordinator

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    So do you mean that you only get 10 buttons period to customize and label, or you get 10 buttons per device? It would appear from remotecentral's review that you get 10 devices to choose from, then I assumed those same 10 buttons could be assigned a different function per device.
    I went ahead and ordered a "gemstone" updated version of the MX-500 off of ebay.
    In my mind, $200 is just too much to pay for a remote that you aren't asolutely in love with.....and $600 is just insane... hehe. The Pronto TSU6000 looks like it has the resolution and color-depth that I would find acceptable.... however, I didn't pay $600 for any single component in my home theater. I wonder how anyone could justify buying the Pronto when the Ipaq Pocket PC exists for around the same price. Until the graphics can compete with a palm pilot at the very least... I'll save my money... [​IMG]
     
  8. Jim Lenneman

    Jim Lenneman Stunt Coordinator

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    Brian,

    Can't argue with your choice, as I said it's a great remote - expecially for the price.

    To answer your question, you get 10 buttons to label for each of your possible 10 devices. Since each device has two possible pages, you get up to 200 5 character labels, maximum. These 10 buttons are also able to function as 10 (out of the 15 max) macro buttons, you just hold them longer to get the macro to work. Unfortunately, if you label the macro function, then you can't label the single code function and visa versa.

    As far as price - check out the Marantz 9200 version of the Pronto Pro, $1250 MSRP. I didn't pay anywhere close to that but it still ain't cheap. It's all relative, I can't imagine paying what they want for a Crestron system. But then again if I were Bill Gates the attitude would change.

    The Ipaq has promise, there's even software that will let it use Pronto Pro ccf programs. There are still issues however. IR signal strength is still poor and highly directional. You can easily miss the target. Eventually, I do believe these devices will the remote control of choice however.

    Regards,

    Jim L
     
  9. Brian AM

    Brian AM Stunt Coordinator

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    Jim,


    I really appreciate your replies and the email you sent me with the instructions on getting the most out of the remote.

    Thanks again,


    Brian
     

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