Projectors vs. RPTV

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by james e m, Jul 14, 2001.

  1. james e m

    james e m Second Unit

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    So I just took a look at some projectors and the don't seem to expensive compared to the HDTV RPTVs. Now I just glanced at them, but what are their drawbacks? Why don't more people buy them? Is the resolution not as high as the RPTVs? Can they not display HDTV images? Just curious...
    james
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    When in doubt...Rock it out.
    [Edited last by james e m on July 14, 2001 at 08:56 AM]
     
  2. Herb Kane

    Herb Kane Screenwriter

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    James:
    Projectors are somewhat of a trade off of a good high quality RPTV. I made the same observation when I was looking to upgrade my then 40" Pioneer RPTV (approx 2-1/2 years ago). So, I purchased an LCD Sharp XV-Z1U projector and a Da-Lite electric Cosmo screen (100"). There is no denying that the clarity on a good RPTV is much sharper than that of a decent projector (and I stress "decent" projector - I'm not talking about a 20k CRT projector). The projectors require a thorough cleaning every year (approx) and a bulb replacement every 2500 hrs of use (approx $300 p/bulb). So, they do require a little maintenance. In addition, if you go with an LCD projector (really, most projectors in fact), your room should be as dark as possible.
    As for the compatibility of HDTV, I'll leave that for someone else to answer. It has been a couple of years since I looked into projectors, and I'm sure they have come a long way in that time frame. Mine is not compatible, although it is pretty much an entry level projector.
    My goal, was to put as much $$ into the audio side of things (which IMO, is more important) and then upgrade the projector in a couple of years which is what I intend to do.
    Do I have any regrets, NONE! At the end of the day, when it comes time to watch a movie, there is nothing like the lights being dimmed, the screen being lowered and watching the movie on a 100" screen to really feel like you're at the theater!
    Good luck,
    Herb.
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    System - Lexicon MC-1, Bryston 9B ST & 4B ST, Pioneer Elite DVD DV-05, Martin Logan (Ascents, Aerius i's, Scripts & Cinema), M&K 75 sub, Richard Grays 1200S, Sharp XV-Z1 projector & Da-Lite Cosmo screen.
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Generally people buy front projectors when they want a picture bigger than they can get with an RPTV.
    For the same technology, CRT, LCD, etc. FPTV and RPTV are about equal, the same issues with geometry, convergence, lenses, HDTV compatibility, etc. RPTV screens do have a rib pitch analogous to the dot pitch of direct view, but in the larger sizes (65") that is usually not the weakest link as far as resolution goes.
    Other video hints:http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  4. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Different people have different opinions on the good and bad points of each. I had planned to get an RPTV, but as you have, realized that a projector could be had for about the same money. I further realized, for me, that an RPTV was just a big TV set and I wanted a home theater. I purchased an LCD projector and will never be happy with anything but a projector again.
    My thoughts are conditioned by the fact I only use it for home theater (movies). I never watch anything over the air. I have no interest in sports, sit-coms, over-the-air movies, etc. Just movies on DVD.
    Some things you have to know how you're going to deal with with a projector:
    1. You need a dark room. Mine was screaming with sunlight. I got it 100% dark with blackout shades, but this requires some doing.
    2. A projector can be expensive to run if you just want to turn it on and have TV on the big screen running a lot.
    3. You need to feed it the best possible signal. For me that is the component feed from a Toshiba SD-5109.
    4. You need to do more research and know more about what you're getting than with an RPTV. There are several other sites that are very good for this. One is the AVSciences forum and the other Projector Central.
    I'll leave the technical discussion of the various possiblilities of each to someone more qualified. I just wanted to post that I had noticed the same thing you have about price and ended up going the projector route.
    From just bringing the box home and aiming it at a white wall the first night, I have progressed to this, one step at a time.
    http://www.kathiejohnson.com/HomeTheater.html
    Deane
     
  5. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Duplicate post deleted.
    [Edited last by Deane Johnson on July 14, 2001 at 05:22 PM]
     
  6. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I'm moving this thread to the TV area. Maybe there will be some more good answers there.
    ------------------
    Philip Hamm
    AIM: PhilBiker
     
  7. Jon_Mx

    Jon_Mx Agent

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    A projector does not have to have a dark room. My Sanyo XP21N with 2500 lumens does just fine with a reasonable amount of ambiant light.
     
  8. Luis Gabriel Gerena

    Luis Gabriel Gerena Second Unit

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    If its a high lumen projector like yours it can be used with light so lumen rating is indeed one point to consider based on your room.
     
  9. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    For movie watching, I like FPTV over RPTV. The drawbacks as some may have mentioned are control of ambient light, and bulb replacement which can cost anywhere around $200-$400. Generally they last around 2000-4000 hours depending on the model.
    orangeman
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    Neil's H.T. Site
    (plus large selection of H.T.Links and movie images)
     
  10. John-D

    John-D Stunt Coordinator

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  11. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

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    Well ... Count me in the projector camp!!
    You can't beat a digital projector for versatility in aspect ratios. You can have true 4:3 when you need it and true 16:9 when you need it, with no compromises. True, the resulting picture will not be quite as good as a HDTV RPTV, but it's "close enough" for our tastes!
    We purchased an inexpensive ($2500) 3-panel LCD projector late last year and have been astonished at both how well it makes 2.35:1 anamorphic DVD appear and how well it's held up (about 700 hours on the bulb now and no discernable "fade".)
    Since we were also looking for a "big picture" for occasional 4:3 sporting events (like college football games) we also purchased a portable 80" 4:3 screen to go along with the 96" 16:9 screen that we keep on the wall in the projector's semi-permanent installation in a downstairs den. (The den also houses a full Dolby Digital 5.1 audio setup; we use an old stereo receiver when the projector goes "portable".)
    This worked out fantastic in that we were able to host a Super Bowl Party upstairs in our living room on the portable 80" 4:3 screen. After the party the projector was happily back at work in the downstairs den. Try doing that with your typical 65" 16:9 RPTV!
    Needless to say, we can't wait for the coming Football Season. Luckily, we have plenty of DVDs' to view before then!
    Joseph
    --------------------------------------------------------
    Equipment:
    Projector: Philips SV20i. Specs: 4:3 PolySci LCD,1250 lumens, 4000 hour bulb, 200:1 contrast ratio, with 16:9 anamorphic DVD support. (This sucker weighs about 7 pounds!!)
    Wall Screen: 96" 16:9 Stewart GrayHawk
    Portable Screen: 80" 4:3 Da-Lite "Insta-Theater"
    Audio in the downstairs den:
    Kenwood 100 Watt DD 5.1 Receiver; Jensen Center; Optimus Sub; Technics Mains; Bose Surrounds
     
  12. MickeS

    MickeS Producer

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    Joseph, you have a good point about the portability. That is something that has always attracted me to the newer, smaller LCD/DLP projectors.
    As for the original question, it's already been answered by many people here, but I would like to add that I still think most people associate home projectors with those older, bigger projectors that are/were used in schools and corporate presentations, set up by people who have no clue what they're doing, producing images far below what they're capable of, and making a lot of noise while they're doing it. I know that's the perception I had before I started looking into what's out there, and what can be done with it.
    If I had a room large enough, I would get a DLP-projector over an RPTV any day.
    /Mike
     
  13. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Mike, you make a good point about people still associating front projectors with the old CRTs. Those were very expensive (they still exist), needed precise adjustment and were big. The new crop of LCD/DLP projectors can be carried with one hand or tucked under one arm, and just sat on the coffee table and be aimed at a white wall.
    I think anyone contemplating a big screen 16:9 RPTV should at least examine the new front projectors to see if they might fit their needs better. And I know they are easier to move up or down the stairs.
    Deane
     
  14. RobertR

    RobertR Lead Actor

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    It's a bit misleading to say that CRT front projectors are very expensive. Yes, you can pay a LOT of money for a new Runco, but a smart, knowledgable CRT buyer will pay a LOT less for SUPERB picture quality that, IMO, will be EASILY superior to any digital projector (for more on this debate, check out the CRT forum at AVSforum.com).
    By a lot less, I'm talking about excellent quality B-stock and refurbished CRT projectors with new tubes that can be had for around $3000 to $4000 (original selling price in the $20k range). I myself bought a BRAND NEW NEC CRT projector (the same model sold for over $30k as a rebadged Runco) for only $6500.
     
  15. John-D

    John-D Stunt Coordinator

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    RobertR, you're correct. However CRT's are not for everyone. They are heavy and tough to setup. Which is where they are more smiliar to RPTV's in public's opinion.
    Of course when we talk about Picture Quality alone.. a properly setup, well calibrated Used/refurb/b-stock 8" CRT PJ will wipe the floor with a similarly priced CRT based RPTV or Digital Projector. You had a superb deal of a fantastic projector for $6500, and I'll join you in saying that for even half that price one can buy a used/refurb/b-stock CRT FP that will make you wanna throw that lamp projector out the window!
    For those dying to shout back DILA for around $10K .. I suggest a G90 B-stock for around $13K.. now THAT is what Front Projection is all about [​IMG]
    ----------------------------------
    The things we own end up owning us
    [Edited last by John-D on July 18, 2001 at 02:17 PM]
     
  16. Frank

    Frank Stunt Coordinator

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    I evaluated CRT front projectors and was pretty impressed with their picture quality when displaying DVDs. I have yet to be impressed with their ability to show HDTV at its best. I have gone through several digital front projectors. I now own five of them.
    I mostly use a JVC G20 D-ILA projector with an anamorphic lens which makes it project at 16/9 image.
    The image quality I get is much better then any RPTV I have ever seen and I have evaluated most of the new ones.
    I recently spent an afternoon evaluating all the new Mitsubishi HDTVs, including the DLP version. I watched mostly HDTV that I have also seen many times on my system.
    I was not very impressed with the image quality of any of them even though they had just been calibrated.
    If and or when I find a RPHDTV that impresses me, I will probably buy it for another room.
    Still looking for that ultimate image quality... [​IMG]
    Frank
    [Edited last by Frank on July 18, 2001 at 06:09 PM]
     
  17. Luis Gabriel Gerena

    Luis Gabriel Gerena Second Unit

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    "for more on this debate, check out the CRT forum at AVSforum.com)."
    Actually is worthless to check any of those Crt vs. digital debates because its all a matter of opinion. If you go to the CRT forum of course CRT are going to be favored since not many digital owners visit that forum but if you go to the DLP, LCD, DILA forum you'll get the opposite reaction. My recommendtion is to sit down and think on what you are looking for, what is more important for you and what you are willing to sacrifice and what not. Then check all technologies and picked the one that is closer to your objective. No technology if perfect so you'll have to compromise something at some point and knowing what you are willing to its very helpful in makind the best desicion in your case.
    Regards
     
  18. RobertR

    RobertR Lead Actor

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  19. CaspianM

    CaspianM Stunt Coordinator

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    As Robert said facts are facts.
    If one is after the best picture quality (uncompromised) of up to 100". CRT is the only choice.
    Lamp PJ is lighter & brighter and can do bigger than 100", at the price of quality. Most people agree on above argument.
    [Edited last by Mahmood M on July 18, 2001 at 10:56 PM]
     
  20. Luis Gabriel Gerena

    Luis Gabriel Gerena Second Unit

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    No picture is uncompromised no matter if its CRT or digital...unless you somehow crossbreed a CRT with a Digital so it now has perfect convergence and geometry all around... don't think so. Not to forget same light output end to end which digital are closer to deliver. But since I don't want to start another pointless crt vs. digital debate I stand with my previous post but I do agree that with careful examination you can get some facts in between all the fanatical remarks on most of these debates.
    Regards
     

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