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Projector settings help(?) for a beginner (1 Viewer)

Duilius_Rex

Auditioning
Joined
Aug 23, 2021
Messages
1
Real Name
Joe
Hi all,

I'm usually a lurker, but a recent experience watching the The Thing in 4k this weekend has brought me out of the shadows. I am hoping my issue can be dealt with by better-calibrating my setup, but I think I might lack the vocabulary to find an answer to this issue on my own. Hence the post.

So, during the stark white Antarctic scenes at the beginning of the film, and during many other bright, outdoor scenes (the opening of The Last Crusade comes to mind), I can only describe he picture as noisy. It's very reminiscent of the snowy static that you'd see if you turned on an old CRT and flipped to a channel with no signal. The noise only appears in the brightest parts of the image. Is this just film grain? It's very very distracting.

My setup is as follows. I have a BenQ TK850 playing 4k discs from a Sony UBPX700, which is routed through a Denon AVR-X1600H receiver. The projector is setup behind a grey Silver Ticket screen in a windowless, dark walled room.

Does anyone have any recommendations for calibrating the setup to minimize this kind of noise? And is noise the best word to use to describe this situation? My searches only turn up issues with audible noise.

I'm happy to provide any other information, and thanks in advance for taking the time to read my post.

-Joe
 

Allan Jayne

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Nov 1, 1998
Messages
2,405
It is unknown whether the noise (you can call it snow) is in the source or was created in your equipment.

If the noise is in the source, you can't fix it, only possibly make it less obtrusive.

You will have to try a few things, one after another.

1. Try turning down the contrast. The technically correct behavior of the contrast control is to vary the "electronic spread" between maximum black and maximum white. If the spread is too great then whites will go above the top, washing out bright details or blacks will go below the bottom, burying shadow detail, or both. The idea here is to reduce the possibility that the input signal is overloading your equipment and where the noise represents distortion due to overload. If your projector does not have the usual brightness and contrast settings, you would reduce the red gain or level, the green gain or level, and the blue gain or level.

2. This one would hide the noise as opposed to fix the noise. Try turning up the contrast. This would create an intentional overload and will have side effects that are possibly undesirable. This "redefines" all those pixels of varying whiteness as maximum white (and also washes out details in other parts of the picture using pixels of the same degrees of whiteness). You would hope that unusual distortions do not result in some pixels pushed above maximum white do not bounce to a place below maximum white producing more the noise problem that you started with.

Sometimes the DVD player has its own brightness and contrast controls. If you turn up the player contrast (or brightness) so much that it clips off the brighter highlights, you won;t get them back by reducing the TV brightness or contrast.

The brightness control (theoretically) sets the level of which pixels show up as black on the screen. The entire spread of black to white goes up and down depending on the brightness setting (while keeping the same "height" or max-min difference) and it is still possible to bury shadow detail and/or clip highlight detail.
 

titch

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
1,413
Real Name
Kevin Oppegaard
Hi all,

I'm usually a lurker, but a recent experience watching the The Thing in 4k this weekend has brought me out of the shadows. I am hoping my issue can be dealt with by better-calibrating my setup, but I think I might lack the vocabulary to find an answer to this issue on my own. Hence the post.

So, during the stark white Antarctic scenes at the beginning of the film, and during many other bright, outdoor scenes (the opening of The Last Crusade comes to mind), I can only describe he picture as noisy. It's very reminiscent of the snowy static that you'd see if you turned on an old CRT and flipped to a channel with no signal. The noise only appears in the brightest parts of the image. Is this just film grain? It's very very distracting.

My setup is as follows. I have a BenQ TK850 playing 4k discs from a Sony UBPX700, which is routed through a Denon AVR-X1600H receiver. The projector is setup behind a grey Silver Ticket screen in a windowless, dark walled room.

Does anyone have any recommendations for calibrating the setup to minimize this kind of noise? And is noise the best word to use to describe this situation? My searches only turn up issues with audible noise.

I'm happy to provide any other information, and thanks in advance for taking the time to read my post.

-Joe
It's the HDR. Won't work with projectors such as yours. You have to find a setting that won't make the highlights go all grainy. I Googled for my Optoma and it made a substantial difference.
 

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