Projection TVs and Video Game Consoles

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JakeG, Jun 14, 2001.

  1. JakeG

    JakeG Auditioning

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    My friend has a projection Television. He also has several different videogame consoles. In the instruction manual, it mentions that it's bad to play it on a projection TV. I thought it had something to do with refresh rates of the signal being output vs. the rate the TV could do or something. I could be mis-informed. I also figured, that if you ran the RCA cables from the console into a VCR, then into the TV with the coax cable, it might be okay. I just wondered if anyone knew what the deal was with all of this. I thought maybe it just meant that you couldn't plug the RCA cables directly from the console into the back of the TV. Thanks.
    ___
    Jake
     
  2. RyanDinan

    RyanDinan Stunt Coordinator

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    Jake,
    It has nothing to do with the refresh rates or anything like that.
    RPTV's, as you know, bounce light off a mirror produced by 3 smaller, separate CRT's within the set. In order for the RPTV to get a picture comparable to a direct-view in terms of brightness, it must drive those little CRT's MUCH harder than the CRT you look directly at with a direct-view set.
    This is where the problems come in. High contrast (PICTURE LEVEL) is a RPTV's worst nightmare - and as you know, determine the maximum white-point of a TV's image. If static images are left displayed for any length of time with the contrast cranked up, you run the risk of burning your CRT's permanently. Since allot of video games have static images (dials, numbers, etc..) they don't lend themselves to be RPTV-friendly.
    Most people find that game counsil video levels are slightly on the dark side as well, forcing the CRT's even harder to get a brighter image.
    Playing games is OK on a RPTV, as long as you have the contrast DOWN to around 30-40% of it's maximum, and give the TV a break every hour or so. You can still run the risk of burning your tubes, but it will be reduced with the picture-level set to a lower point.
    Most RPTV's come from the factory with the picture level set to 100% (torch mode), which can destroy your CRT's in a matter of minutes, if a bright white or static image is left displayed. The higher contrast the image, the more dangerous. The light emitted by your CRT's is produced when an electron beam strikes the phosphor coated surface (Red green or blue). The more intense the electron beam, the brighter the glow. These phosphors can literally burn (losing brightness) if not allowed to "cool". You never want any static images on your set for any prolonged amount of time. As long as you have a moving image across the whole CRT, you should get an average burn across the whole CRT.
    -Ryan Dinan
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    [​IMG]
     
  3. Sam Hatch

    Sam Hatch Stunt Coordinator

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    Yeah, isn't it wonderful that all of those manuals EXPLAIN why video games and RPTVs could be a bad combination?
    My SONY Playstation manual says not to connect with RPTVs without consulting the TV's manual. Nothing else. My... SONY! RPTV manual says NOTHING about video games. Go figure. Do they not realize that people may be inferring that playing games will instantly damage their sets based on this nebulous advice? How hard is it for them to briefly explain the dangers of burn-in and how to lessen them?
    This is one of the most often asked questions around here. What Ryan said is true, but I may be pushing the limits on his 'hour or so' recommendation some days. Games get alot of use on my RPTV, and it hasn't exploded yet, so plug in and enjoy!
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    "Negative. I am a meat popsicle."
     
  4. Jerry Gracia

    Jerry Gracia Supporting Actor

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    Jake,
    On an ill-calibrated RPTV set, yes...there is serious danger of burning in images on a RPTV from video game use.
    But on a RPTV properly calibrated with VIDEO ESSENTIALS or AVIA, the danger is greatly reduced. I've been playing video games on my 61" RPTV since I bought it nearly THREE years ago. I've played PLAYSTATION, NINTENDO 64 and now PLAYSTATION 2 on it...no problems at all. I back my CONTRAST/PICTURE setting off a couple more notces from my calibrated level for extra security.
    Main point...keep the CONTRAST/PICTURE setting very low as recommended by Ryan (30-40%) and don't EVER leave a game paused for too long. What I do when I pause a game is change the channel to a TV station.
    I've played for 2-3 hours straight at times...sometimes longer!
    No problems thus far.
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    LuvLBX
    The screen isn't half empty, it's half full.
     
  5. Mike Veroukis

    Mike Veroukis Second Unit

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    Okay, well, this seems to have turned into another full-blown discussion on burn-in. That's cool with me because I have a bit of a question. I just bought a brand new Toshiba 50HX70. Love the TV. I've read many posts about burn-in and the very first thing I did with that TV is set the contrast to 35; a value I've seen posted around here often. HOWEVER, once I started watching TV and even DVD movies I noticed that many scenes are so dark you can't see a thing! I pushed up the contrast little by little until I got up to 50. Things start to look good at this point, even in dark scenes, but I think for it to really shine I'd need to push it up to 55 or 60. Is this starting to get dangerous? Do people get used to watching very dark images? Do you have to watch TV with "dark room" lighting conditions?
    Can I safely compensate with pushing the brightness levels up high? If say I turn the contrast to 40 is it okay to turn the brightness up to 60 or 70? Or is that defeating the purpose? If someone could explain the relationship between contrast and brightness, that would be great!
    - Mike
     
  6. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Michael Chen
    Greetings
    Why don't you just use AVIA or Video Essentials and set up the brightness and contrast correctly. Eliminate most of the guess work and just get used to what the image should look like with optimized user controls.
    As opposed to what you think it should look like.
    Regards
    [​IMG]
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    [​IMG]
    Michael @ The Laser Video Experience
     

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