Progressive Scan?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bonnie, Feb 10, 2002.

  1. Bonnie

    Bonnie Auditioning

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    Hi folks, Great forum! (This is my first posting)

    I'm trying to decide on a low-end DVD player. Mostly for DVDs and standard CDs. No real need for MP3 or CD-Rs. I'm considering the following at this time (but could be swayed to consider others):

    - Sony DVP-NS300

    - Panasonic DVD-RP56

    - Sony DVP-NS700P

    I know that only the RP56 and NS700P are progressive scan players, but I'm wondering if my setup will be able to take advantage of it. I have an RCA F35760MB TV which is about 5 years old. Specs say it has a horizontal resolution of 830 lines, but only 623 per EIA measurement criteria.

    Question: Would I see a difference with Progressive Scan with this TV? Is any of this dependent on my A/V reciever?

    Also (for curiousity sake), what's "EIA measurement criteria"?

    Bonnie
     
  2. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    Cees Alons
    Welcome to the forum Bonnie!
    Although I don't know your specific TV model, I can tell you I don't think it will use the progressive scan feature.
    (1) 5 years ago, (almost?) no model did.
    (2) horizontal resolution is the resolution along the horizontal lines. Think of it as the numbers of (virtual, because it's really analogue) pixels on a line. The vertical resolution is related to the progressive scan notion and is measured as "number of horizontal lines" (you could also say: number of vertical pixels, or : pixels along a vertical line). So, the "820" has nothing to do with it.
    I hope I made it more clear and not more complicated [​IMG].
    Now, whether or not you want a progressive scan DVD-player may be another story. What TV set are you planning to buy in the future, and when?
    Cees
     
  3. Bonnie

    Bonnie Auditioning

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    Thanks for the info - yes, it does help.

     
  4. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    My opinion would be to not bother with one of the more pricy models. Your current TV will still be the limiting factor, and in a few years time from now there may be much more enticing options available when you start thinking about upgrading.

    Maybe even something that can record at prices that are more humane than the current ones?

    Also, if you decide that you want more than a big RPTV and decide to go with a HDTV capable front projector (which would be my choice), more likely than not that will have good progressive scan circuitry built-in.

    Something like the Sony VPL-VW11HT, which already equals or exceeds just about every progressive scan DVD player out there as far as I know, and in fact may look better when fed with component video from a normal interlaced player.

    In fact, the differences between the really expensive models and the really cheap ones when it comes to picture- and sound quality are negligible. Some people have bought an el cheapo DVD player for their bedroom systems or whatever and found that the cheap player could match or even better their existing, more pricy, player.
     
  5. Bruce Hedtke

    Bruce Hedtke Cinematographer

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    Go with a good interlaced model player now. You could "future proof" yourself and get a progressive scan player now...but price points on those players seems to fall every year. When you upgrade to a HD monitor, definitely get a progressive scan player. By then, you should be able to get a very good player for quite a bit less than what they cost today. So, in your case, it does make sense to wait.

    Bruce
     
  6. Mike_Mig

    Mike_Mig Stunt Coordinator

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    I see no reason NOT to go with a progressive scan player. They really are not very expensive. The Panny RP-56 would be an excellent choice and can be had for close to $200. I bought one myself for my sister using it on a non progressive capable tv and here and her husband just love it. If you got a non progressive model now, I think when you do upgrade you will regret it. Just my opinion.

    Mike
     
  7. Justin Sallows

    Justin Sallows Auditioning

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    You should keep in mind that all a progressive scan player is is a more efficient line doubler. A "normal" DVD player isn't holding anything back. Until HD-DVD comes along in about 5 years, it's all in the line doubling. High end TVs do this rather well actually, particularly HDTVs. From what I understand, and I haven't directly compared them, slanted lines are not as jagged on a progressive scan player as they are on a regular player....and they may be a little clearer, but that's about it. By the time you get around to buying a $2-3000 TV, HD-DVD will probably be here anyway. The TV is where 90% of your video quality is going to come from, so until you upgrade that, the player doesn't matter so much. By the way, only get a Toshiba or Sony, the rest may not even play some of the DVDs out there.
     
  8. Mike_Mig

    Mike_Mig Stunt Coordinator

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    quote:

    __________________________________________________ ______

    By the way, only get a Toshiba or Sony, the rest may not even play some of the DVDs out there.

    __________________________________________________ ______

    Do you know something the rest of us don't. I have never had trouble with my Panasonic RP-91.

    Again, please think ahead, there is absolutely no reason not to get a progressive player. Almost all new players are Progressive capable so why wouldn't you get one.
     
  9. Ken Shiring

    Ken Shiring Agent

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    Mike_Mig, I am going to have to disagree with you. Here's why:
    Reccomending a progressive DVD player for interlaced duty assumes that the interlaced output of the player is equally good as the progressive output. I know for a fact that this is not so in some of the progressive units, possibly many of them. The player I use, for example, the Panasonic RP-56, is known to have sub-standard interlaced output. I have seen it myself, and it is noticably worse than progressive.
    In addition, I think that many of the interlaced players have a better featureset and better user interface than the progressive ones do. It's almost like the manufacturers think there's a rule that progressive scan requires a crappy remote [​IMG].
    Justin :
     
  10. Mike_Mig

    Mike_Mig Stunt Coordinator

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    Ken,
    If that is true about the interlaced output being somewhat less on an progressive player (or some), than an interlaced only player my advice would not be the best, but I would still evaluate whether the noticeable difference between the progressive players and non progressive players is worth having to buy a new player when the upgrade in monitor is made. Because we all know an upgrade is inevitable in this hobby, right [​IMG] .
    Mike
     
  11. Justin Sallows

    Justin Sallows Auditioning

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    My comment about players other than Toshiba and Sony is based on personal experience as well as word of mouth and Consumer Reports. CR rates Toshiba and Sony in the top 5 DVD players. My experience with a Samsung DVD-907 ($350.00) was horrendous. I first noticed it when it wouldn't play Babe: Pig in the City. I thought it was a fluke, but then more and more DVDs would not play on it, or just freeze up. Forget seamless branching, not a chance. I tried to go through Best Buy, but they were no help. Then I tried to go through Samsung. After months of pleading, they agreed to upgrade the laser to dual-layer capable. When I picked it up I realized it actually made it worse. The last straw was when I bought Disney's Dinosaur and it wouldn't even boot up. That day I bought a Toshiba SD2300 ($150.00) and never looked back. I have over 300 DVDs, and not a single one has had a problem. There is nothing more frustrating than buying a DVD, not being able to watch it and not being able to return it either because it works fine on Best Buy's Sony machine. THAT'S why I recommend to everybody, don't put yourselfd in that position, just buy a Toshiba or Sony and forget about it.
     
  12. Scott Page

    Scott Page Stunt Coordinator

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    I suggest that know one using the reviews in Consumer Reports to pick electronic equipment (EE). I used to love this magazine, but their EE reviews are not very good. I've seen them recommend crap and ignore quality components. The technology changes to fast and their are to many manufacturers out their.

    Instead rely on forums like this one for advice on specific models. Consider JVC players. They have been rated very high in direct comparisions on review web sites. IMHO, try several players from the Panasonic, JVC, Toshiba, Sony, Pioneer lines. Then pick the one you like the most. I would not worry to much as to whither or not it is progressive. You will likely buy another player in a couple of years and can then use what ever you buy now on another TV in the house (assuming you are like most people and have more than 1 TV in the house).

    HD-DVD is likely 7 to 10 years away.

    Keep in mind that the bigger the TV, the better the "source" should be. Imperfections go from not noticable to very noticable when the TV gets biger.
     
  13. Robert P. Jones

    Robert P. Jones Second Unit

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    I saw and tried out a Mintek DVDP from Best Buy recently - needed one for a calibration, the guy had bought a 36" HDready Sony and didn't even have a DVDP for me to put my test discs in!

    This Mintek was component output capable, for $79, brand new and in the box. It worked great, for our purposes. He decided to simply buy it, from the price I gave him on it, which was markedly lower than a progressive would have been, tho I did make a little money on the deal (of course!)

    Just buy one of those for now, and forget about progressive till you really need it. At that time you might get a lot more for your buck than you will now, in terms of the bells and whistles that would come with it then vs. now.

    I have the RP-56 and consider its progressively scanned pic luxurious on my HDready Panny 65", and noticeably better than the JVC 65GD's. Haven't tried the interlace in it, but ALL interlaced pix will suck, compared to their progressive scan counterparts, within the same machine.

    Mr Bob
     

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