Progressive Scan should i buy???

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by jamesTheron, Jan 13, 2005.

  1. jamesTheron

    jamesTheron Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    hello im thinking about getting a Progressive Scan tv but i just bought a analog tube type 2 year ago i have never seen a Progressive Scan set up is it that much better and worth buying a new 32in Progressive Scan 1080i tv i can get one on ebay for $550.00 shipped.
     
  2. ChuckSolo

    ChuckSolo Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2003
    Messages:
    1,160
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We would really need more information to answer the question correctly. I am assuming the TV is an HDTV monitor and can accept progressive signals. A "progressive" scan TV takes a normal resolution picture, broadcast or DVD and converts it to it's native resolution, be that 480p, 720p, 768p or 1080i. Some TVs do that better than others. Giving us more information on the TV would help us help you better.
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Except, please note that 1080i is not a progressive signal.
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 1998
    Messages:
    2,404
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    All HDTV sets nowadays convert incoming regular NTSC (interlaced; 480i) into progressive scan (the 480p variety) using a built in circuit called a de-interlacer or line doubler. Most HDTV's will do another step and convert the 480p into 540 scan lines per frame and display that as interlaced (1080i). (Or convert the 480p into 720 or 768 scan lines stil displayed progressive.)

    A small number of HDTV's have a 540p/1080i setting that usually functions with all inputs. The video content stays the same, all that seting does is optically shift the 540 scan line fields to be superimposed looking progressive (540p) or staggered looking interlaced (1080i).

    The difference between interlaced and progressive (at the 480 level) is easier to see if you wear relatively strong eyeglasses. If you wiggle your glasses up and down, you will see a coarse scan line effect on traditional (analog) TV's that you don't see on HDTV's.

    Unfortunately, even today, the quality of the conversion from 480i to 480p varies widely in terms of picture detail preservation. DVD is inherently interlaced so all progressive scan DVD players have a de-interlacer.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/viddoubl.htm
     

Share This Page