progressive dvd picture vs. regular dvd

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by lee.b, Jan 21, 2003.

  1. lee.b

    lee.b Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok...I'm familiar with the difference (on a 27" wega set) of composite,s-video, and component cables. There is a difference between s-video and component, though unless I freeze frame and examine, I don't know that I'd ever see the difference. The difference between composite and s-video, which is supposed to be more dramatic, seem almost identical to me in freeze frame.

    That said, I am utilizing, of course, my auto 16:9 mode on my non hd wega, but don't utilize, of course, a progressive scan dvd player as it is unncessary for my tv. The question is, assuming my tv was hdtv ready and could and did 'oblige' a progressive scan dvd player - what difference would my eye see, and would it be more dramatic than the difference between s-video and component? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Lee,
    The answer to your question pretty much hinges on the quality of the line doubler in the HD-ready tv set.

    With a decent line doubler, the difference between an interlaced signal coming in via component video cables and a progressive scan signal from component cables is not huge.

    I have a Sony KP57HW40 widescreen HD-ready rptv and Panny CP-72 progressive scan player. The difference in PQ from progressive vs interlaced output from the player is about the same as the difference between S-video and component video from an interlaced player going into your current analog set--noticeable but not earthshaking.

    My player is hooked up with S-video thru my reciever, and Component straight to the TV's inputs. I do this so I can use AVIA for calibrating sound and still be able to use the receiver's onscreen display. The player will output interlaced via S-video and progressive via component simultaneously. Sometimes I've done some audio tweaking using interlaced and S-video on the tv, switched to a regular movie, and gotten 20 minutes into the movie thinking it looked pretty good before realizing I'd forgotten to change the tv to the component input for the progressive scan signal. Once I do change it the pic is noticeably better, but it's good enough via S-video that I don't always remember to switch inputs on the tv.
     
  3. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    Lee,

    Are scan lines visible to you w/ your current setup? That is, do you see horizontal gaps in the image now? Do you notice any flickering? Do you notice any venetian blind effects, etc?

    If you see NONE of these things on your current setup, then the benefit of going progressive will probably be very subtle to you unless you also want a bigger display and/or plan to sit closer to the TV.

    If, however, you see all of these things, then the benefit can be good to great depending on how distracted you are by those things.

    _Man_
     
  4. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    Images are slightly cleaner with 480P and the resolution is also slightly higher than 480i. Usually 500 vs 540

    Regards
     

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