Progressive and RGB

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Stelios, Feb 6, 2004.

  1. Stelios

    Stelios Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi
    If you have a progressive DVD player and a normal CRT TV with RGB inputs is the picture quality any different than from a non progressive DVD?

    Stelios
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    I don't understand your question, but if I follow:

    you have a progressive-scan dvd player with component outputs. And you have a (CRT projector?) with RGB ins. So it is unclear what kind of output/input you are using to the projector? Are you using a component-rgb transcoder? Or another method without it, such as s-video?

    You won't be getting progressive scan unless you are using the component outs on the DVD player (unless it has RGB outs, which I don't know of many, or any at all actually, that do). If you could clarify, we could see what's going on.

    If you have it set up such that you are viewing progressive scan, then certainly it is improved over interlaced. But I can't tell from your question if this is the case.
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    A normal CRT TV set with RGB inputs might not accept progressive scan, such TV sets are often used as studio monitors and might be 480i only.

    In addition, component video must be transcoded into RGB in order to be fed into an RGB input. Either or both the DVD player and TV may do the transcoding and if so there will be a manual switch setting to let one device match the other.

    There is no inherent loss of picture quality when going from component to RGB although transcoder quality can vary.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/compon.htm
     
  4. Don_Berg

    Don_Berg Supporting Actor

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    Your RGB inputs are most likely component video inputs. But if you only have an analog set, it won't support progressive (480p) video format, only interlaced (480i). You would need to upgrade to a digital/HD TV set to support 480p progressive input.
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Not true. If he is dealing with a CRT FP, which I suspect he is(i think i recall pming with him about CRT projectors in the past), then it is most likely that there is no component input at all. Only a few much newer models come with component inputs, and these models are not prevalent in the consumer world unless you are looooaded with cash. In which case you probably have custom designers handling all this stuff for you anyway, and they would be using RGBhv anyway...

    I just posted this to the same effect in another thread RE the "analog" set not supporting progressive or hdtv: This has ABSOLUTLEY NOTHING at all to do with whether or not a set supports high def resolutions. There are MANY analog TVs that are high-definition TVs(the VAST majority of HDTVs are analog CRTs). Mine goes beyond high def, and it is an ANALOG display. Don't confuse the TYPE of display with the resolution capabilities of the set. Likewise there are digital televisions that DO NOT support or display high-def signals.

    The word digital is such a common marketed word, that it's meaning varies and you really need to know what you are talking about when you use it. For instance "digital" and "analog" CRT projectors, has NOTHING to do with the fact that the set is actually analog by it's very nature of design. It has NOTHING to do with the resolution capabilities of the set at all. It has everything to do with the way the set is adjusted and converged, and whether or not the ANALOG unit is digitally controlled. Things get a little bit confused especially with regards to "digital" tvs in general. This word is OFTEN misused to very confusing ends because of its easy marketing popularity. Call an analog set "digital" and it sells. /end rant mode

    And allen is correct, that transcoding does not per se degrade the video quality, however to do it right is costly, as you will discover with crushed blacks w/regards to cheaper transcoders not correctly handling sync signals.
     
  6. Stelios

    Stelios Stunt Coordinator

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    The TV that we are talking here is the Sony KV-36HQ100. It's an CRT (tube) set. Not a HDTV.
    It has though the new Super Fine Pitch CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) that dramatically improves picture resolution. The centre pitch of the tube is reduced from 0.77mm to 0.47mm subsequently increasing the number of vertical ‘slits’ and therefore increasing horizontal resolution by 60%.
    It has Scart RGB inputs not component(Y,Pb Pr).

    Stelios
     
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    >>> Call an analog set "digital" and it sells. /end rant mode...

    It might be noted that many HDTV monitor sets including good ones have an all analog path for the HDTV "digital" signals, using digital circuitry (if any) just to achieve better convergence. Meanwhile the same TV set uses a digital signal path (the comb filter and de-interlacer) for regular "analog" broadcasts.

    SCART refers to the shape of the plugs and jacks used for cabling. It is possible for a TV with just a SCART input to take component video via that jack but again if it takes both RGB and component there will be a manual selection. Most of the time a TV with SCART input expects slightly different voltage levels compared with other TV sets that have RCA jacks or accept just component video although usually it works OK if you ignore this detail.
     

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