Probobly a Retarded Question but.. (I'd like some advice)

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Tony+C, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. Tony+C

    Tony+C Auditioning

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    I have a 4 year old 5.1 surround sound system ( Yamaha NS-P220 Home Cinema 5.1ch Speakers ). I don't know if the sub is passive or not. I havent necessarily looked closely through the manual but I don't think it really matters.

    This surround Sound system is adaquate for my room. I made a mistake and designed the 'rests' for my satallite speakers to be up in the corners of the room so I guess I'm stuck with 'Imaging' for now if I want to get the best SS effects. (I'm hoping someone will correct me here If I used the wrong term here.) So I have the surround sound which I'm happy with for the time being and it includes a sub which I mentioned before. If I do a THX test the sub fails horribly. When I do a surround sound test signal the sub once again produces a very faint sound. I assure you it's not blown but I don't think it does the movies justice in any sense of the word! So I'm sitting here with an old Pioneer IMPP 10" sub (10yrs old) and thinking about building it out as my surround sub. Is this recommended or would I be crossmatching 'timbres'. What's the feel on this?

    One other question, and I'll make this quick, can an RF modulator move signal from a TV TO a reciever? The reason I ask is that I only have coax connection on my TV.

    --Thanks in advance for any help.


    -- -- edit: darn- I posted in the wrong forum. [​IMG]

    -------- [​IMG] can't delete my post and cover my tracks... :/
     
  2. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    Tony, not sure what you mean when you do a THX test and the sub fails horribly. Do you mean that when the THX logo and sounds come on that the subs seems to distort? The levels of the speakers and sub are best set with a SPL (sound pressure level) meter so that when the test tone is selected you can see that from the listening spot all channel levels and the sub produce the same volume with the test signal. The std. RF modulator, which can be purchased at Radio Shack or places like partsexpress.com is made to take composite video signals and analog audio signal from a source (such as a DVD player) and let you output the video via a std. antenna connection and the audio either to an input on the TV or receiver.

    If the receiver has a digital input to get Dolby Digital sound you may want to connect a digital cable from the DVD player to the receiver, a composite video cable from the DVD player to the RF modulator and a cable with 'F' connectors from the RF modulator to the TV antenna input. Connecting the analog audio cables from the RF modulator to the receiver can only get you analog sound (the DVD player set-up menu in such a case should be configured to define that you only have a left and right speaker connected) and then you would use the surround sound capablities of the receiver with an analog input (not Dolby Digital). If you are using a digital cable from the DVD player to the receiver then you would define the speakers that you have connected (e.g. left, right, center, sub, etc.).
     
  3. Tony+C

    Tony+C Auditioning

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    That's essentially what I have. It's setup like this: digital coax from the Dvd to the reciever. Composite from the DVD to the RF modulator. That gives me Dolby Digital I.

    I'm trying to get my surround speakers to work while using the TV to watch regular broadcast stations. I tried hooking up the RF modulator audio to the reciever TV inputs but I get no sound. I've looked through the manual for my reciever and find that I've done what it intstructs.

    [​IMG]

    I'm wondering if the RF modulator converts signals both ways. So when I watch DVD's the signal is sent TO the TV and when I watch TV the audio signal is sent FROM the TV.

    [​IMG]

    -- Thanks for the reply BTW.

    edit: Ohh, and what I'm talking about when I say the THX test is a test where a high frequency sent is sent to your speakers and travels down to your lowest frequency. Sounds like a very controlled version of the THX sound scheme thing you see at beginnings of movies. No distortion but only minimal bass from the sub. When the signal gets to it's lower frequencies it stops kinda like if I have a crossover setup wrong or something, but it's all internal.
     
  4. Phil A

    Phil A Producer

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    The RF modulator works one way as your TV connection is an input to the TV only. If you want TV sound and also to be able to play the DVD player you should have gotten a VCR (stereo or mono your choice) with a video input (either front or rear of the unit) that does the same thing as the RF modulator. It would not cost that much more than a stand along RF modulator. The digital audio cable would still go from the DVD player to the receiver and the composite video output of the DVD player to the composite video input of the VCR with the antenna output of the VCR into the TV and the left and right (for a stereo VCR) going to a stereo input on the receiver and the VCR's tuner would transmit the audio into the receiver.

    Again with channel levels you need to use an SPL meter from the listening position to see that levels are adjusted properly. Sounds like your subs protection circuitry is kicking in and it shuts off, either overloaded or not working properly. A Dolby Digital receiver has crossover setting for the output for the sub. The most common one used is 80HZ. If the sub has crossover controls it should be set above the crossover point used in the receiver since the crossover in the receiver is controlling.
     

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