Problems with my Pioneer VSX 27TX

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Rourke McNamara, Feb 5, 2004.

  1. Rourke McNamara

    Rourke McNamara Auditioning

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    Last night I hooked up my Pioneer receiver in my new apartment. Two front speakers, one wired directly and the other through the cool in-wall wiring to route the cable around the fireplace. Bananna plugs on the speaker and received end, and screw downs bare-wire on the wall side (I need to go pick up some more interconnects).

    Two rears, also using the in-wall wiring. Bare wire on the wall, bananna plugs on the speaker and receiver side.

    I turned everything on and after a couple of minutes the received made a funny noice and shut off. Turned it on, same thing. Turned it on quieter and it just took longer to shut off. I checked all the cables and everything seemed fine. I disconnected the rears and it still happened. I replaced both front speaker cables and it worked fine.

    By process of elimination I narrowed the problem down to the in-wall wiring for the left surround speaker and one of my speaker cables.

    Couple of questions:

    1) Did all this messing around with my received shutting off by itself damage the receiver?

    2) Is it possible for a speaker cable to visually look fine but be bad? If so, is it possible that some of my others are "halfway" bad?

    3) Is there something else wrong here that I'm missing?

    Thanks,
    Rourke
     
  2. Robert Fellows

    Robert Fellows Stunt Coordinator

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    Disconnect your speaker wires and turn it back on. If it dies, then it isn't the wires. If it doesn't then hook up the wires 1 by 1 until it does.
     
  3. Rourke McNamara

    Rourke McNamara Auditioning

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    I did. I got it to work with all four speakers by using different wires and not using the in wall wiring.

    Setting it up that way isn't viable becuase I don't have enough cable for the surrounds. So I went back to two front speakers for now. Everything works.

    I'm just concerned and wondering what's wrong with the in-wall wiring. I need to get this resolved before I go out and buy a center channel and sub.
     
  4. ChrisHeflen

    ChrisHeflen Supporting Actor

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    My guesses;

    The wiring in the wall may not be right. Meaning positive or negative might get switched somehow in the wall wiring by the time it gets to your speakers from you receiver. Try reversing the wires at one end.
    If you can, remove the plates at both "ends" and if the wire is marked, make sure the same wire is going to the same terminal on both ends.

    Your reiceiver, by shutting down, was protecting it's self. Usually the cause is improper pos. to pos. neg. to neg.
     
  5. Rourke McNamara

    Rourke McNamara Auditioning

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    The strange thing is the fact that it wouldn't shut down right away. It would shut down within a minute or so, sometimes a little longer when the rear was the only problem.
     
  6. ChrisHeflen

    ChrisHeflen Supporting Actor

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    Maybe because the amps weren't pushing out enough for the protection circutry to work yet.?
     
  7. Bill Will

    Bill Will Screenwriter

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    When you installed the in-wall wiring did you use staples, wire clips or etc that you might have run through the wires by mistake? I know this happened to a friend of mine & we tracked it down to a staple that had gone through one of the wires. But as above reverse the wires first to see if that solves the problem. Also if you are using wall plates make sure there are no lose strands of wires touching each other & this also applies when you are hooking up the wires to the receiver itself I don't know how many times over the years that everything looked fine until I looked at the speaker connections really close only to discover one fine strand of wire touching the other & the worst expericence I ever had was with one strand of very fine wire that would only short everything out once in awhile & it turned out to be only when the speaker vibrated a certain way at a certain volume level & I must have checked all the connections a 100 times before I just happened to stumble across that damn little strand of wire [​IMG]
     
  8. Rourke McNamara

    Rourke McNamara Auditioning

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    So the problem has to be either a short of a polarity reversal? It can't be caused by the cables simply being weak or frayed, right?
     
  9. Stephen Hopkins

    Stephen Hopkins HW Reviewer
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    It's not a phase reversal problem. That wouldn't cause the receiver to shut off, it would only cause the speaker to be out of phase.

    It definitely sounds like there's a short in your wirring somewhere. Try each in-wall path by it's self and see which causes shutdown. Then check the connections on the insides of the wall plates to make sure no strands or drips of solder (depending on how the in-wall wire connects to the wall plates) are shorting out the connection. If the short isn't at one of the plates then it's probably a staple or nail somewhere in the line causing the short, making it nearly impossible to fix unless you can get inside the wall.
     

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