Preventing burn in during game sessions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by ethan_l, Nov 15, 2002.

  1. ethan_l

    ethan_l Stunt Coordinator

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    let's say I play hardcore for like 2 hrs, then I turn off
    the RP HDTV how long should I let it cool off?
     
  2. Rich Chiavaroli

    Rich Chiavaroli Stunt Coordinator

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    It's not about letting it cool off. It's about the CRT's doing something else except displaying static images. If you only play 1 hour a day, it's the same game every day and that's all you use the TV for, it will burn in.

    So turning it off the TV isn't what's needs. You need to vary the viewing.
     
  3. ethan_l

    ethan_l Stunt Coordinator

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    so I need to switch to a different image every hour?
     
  4. Rich Chiavaroli

    Rich Chiavaroli Stunt Coordinator

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    You just need to vary whats on the TV. The burn in occurs on the CRT's. If you're playing a game that displays a static image (or watch a channel that does), that portion of the CRT will get more wear than the rest. To prevent this, you should limit the amount of time that a static image is displayed in relation to the time that the TV is in use.

    If you're playing a game for 2 hours, and then put on regular tv for a few hours, you're probably going to be ok. I don't know what best ratio for game/regular viewing would be, but in one users manual it said that you shouldn't have the TV displaying a 4:3 image more than 25% of the time. That might be a good ratio to use.. though it's possible that you would be OK with a higher ratio.
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Playing video games shortens the useful life of any display, especially relatively fragile units such as RPTVs. As Rich notes, one must vary the signal source and aspect ratio of the programming—along with reducing the RPTV's white and black levels—to even out the phosphor wear. But if it were my money and my RPTV, the unit would be used strictly for home-theater purposes. Play your games on a smaller direct-view set.
     
  6. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Well actaully you shouldn't be playing any games on RPTV. I would put it this way.. Anything that does not raster will burn in no matter what, since you will build it up.

    Inside the tube from what I've been told from a high-end TV store, there are like gasses in there and since the game will have things that will not raster, that image would be retained in that gas and it would cause like a heat generation in that particular spot where it's not rastering and that's how the burn-in will form. Gradually it will burn the tube if this is kept up.

    An example of a result of burn in damage would be. Lets say an energy bar from a game... you can see a ghost-like image of it when the TV is on and you can see through the ghost image and see the ghost image which is supposed to be displayed without the ghost.

    You rather have a Direct View TV for games because it takes very long to burn-in a screen and you don't have to worry about it.
     
  7. elMalloc

    elMalloc Supporting Actor

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    Could all be true, and probably is, but I certainly can't stop playing games on my new 57".

    We'll see what happens, but knowing me, I'll have another TV within 2-3 years anyways, at least.

    -ELmO
     
  8. DerekF

    DerekF Stunt Coordinator

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    Couple more tips...keep the contrast as low as possible (increase brightness if needed), and turn off unecessary HUDs in the games' options menus wherever possible. Never, ever leave a pause screen on when you run to see who's at the door, and play the games in full-screen mode only.

    And make sure your friends know the above rules as well (to avoid coming home from the pub to find your room-mate dozing in front of the screen with a high-contrast PAUSED flashing in the middle of the screen).

    The above, in combination with varied viewing will make burn-in much less likely (pretty much a non-issue).

    Derek
     
  9. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    Lowering down is a mehtod but it doesn't stop it from occurring since it's just basically slowing down the burn-in process.
     
  10. DerekF

    DerekF Stunt Coordinator

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  11. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    One big problem that some don't notice is that some games come windowboxed and short of not playing it, you will always have a static image on the screen while you play. Many PS2 games fit this mode.

    Regards
     
  12. DerekF

    DerekF Stunt Coordinator

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    Michael, By windowboxed, do you mean when the developer frames the field-of-view with a static image, i.e. the a-pillars and dashboard of a car?
     
  13. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    Nope, I mean that the game window which should be typically 640x480 in size is actually rendered in a smaller 580x436 (for example) canvas. The remaining data area is black ... a windox box. Like w/s black bars only all the way around.

    Always there ... never changing colour ...

    They do this to account for effects of overscan of most people's TV sets to make sure parts of the game are not cut off.

    Regards
     
  14. DerekF

    DerekF Stunt Coordinator

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    Interesting--You learn something new every day! [​IMG]
    I wonder if that could be avoided by using one of the zoom modes...or if 16:9 games also leaver these pixels on the edge...
     
  15. John-Miles

    John-Miles Screenwriter

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    Really, i never knew this Michael.... but that does explain why i had to increase the overscan on my tv to make video games look ok.... those damn video game makers... why cant they be normallike everyone else?
     
  16. Matthew_F

    Matthew_F Stunt Coordinator

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    DerekF,

    Actaully I did already say in my earlier about things that don't move(no raster) will burn.
     

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