President Bush to announce manned trip to Moon, Mars (merged)

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by BrianShort, Jan 8, 2004.

  1. BrianShort

    BrianShort Supporting Actor

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    I guess I'd have to hear details before I really know how serious this is. It makes it sound like a manned Mars mission would be a "down the road" proposal, where a moon expedition would come first. If they do eventually do this, I would hope that any return to the Moon is used as a testbed for hardware that will eventually go to Mars. Building completely separate hardware would be a waste of money. I'll wait for the speech before I make any more comments I think.

    Brian
     
  2. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    Here's to hoping it's a REAL commitment.[​IMG]
     
  3. CharlesD

    CharlesD Screenwriter

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    Indeed. If the Administration really means to aggressively fight for full funding for this initiative then it is a wonderful thing.
     
  4. Shawn Shultzaberger

    Shawn Shultzaberger Supporting Actor

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    I'm with ya on this one. [​IMG]

    But deep down inside I believe they will go thru with it. There is to much going on with other countries not to do it. They would be shooting themselves in the foot if we don't.
     
  5. BrianShort

    BrianShort Supporting Actor

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    Slightly different article from CNN


    2018 for the moon? We did it in 8 years before!

    Brian
     
  6. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    Well, the biggest difference is we have tons of Shuttles, and none of those are designed, or would be remotely able to, reach the moon and return. So, we'll have to start new spacecraft, etc. 2018 is a long way, though.. hmm.
     
  7. CharlesD

    CharlesD Screenwriter

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    Before Apollo there were no Saturn Vs, the entire infrastructure had to be designed and implemented then also.

    In any case the reality is that this proposal will cost lots of $s and there are any number of reasons why it might not get fully funded. I for one hope it will happen but don't hold your breath.
     
  8. BrianShort

    BrianShort Supporting Actor

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    Another article with some more detail from UPI
     
  9. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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  10. Jason_Els

    Jason_Els Screenwriter

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    Well somebody has to stop the U-foes, seems we're going to be the solar system's protectors too.

    Now if only they staffed it with cute, scantily-clad British clones. [​IMG]
     
  11. MikeH1

    MikeH1 Screenwriter

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    I think thats great. I would love to see a space program doing the kind of things like they did back in the 60's and 70's.
     
  12. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    maybe it's just part of his missile defense system? [​IMG]

    I agree though, I think it's great. Been a long time since the president said we were going to do something interesting, now if he can only make it happen...
     
  13. Peter Kline

    Peter Kline Cinematographer

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    This announcement was rumored to happen during the Wright Brothers celebration last month - a thread about it was posted, but it was obviously put off until the Mars landing had been successful. According to a New York Times article, the goal is open-ended on both a base on the Moon and then a Mars voyage. It will not be a sprint that we did to get to the Moon in 8 years. New Rockets (we have nothing to get men to the moon at the moment), new propulsion systems (for the Mars voyage) and other new technology have to be developed_. Probably be 10 to 20 years... or longer. New York Times story.
     
  14. Peter Kline

    Peter Kline Cinematographer

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    Ah, just found this thread. There's another one posted as well. This proposal or a rumor of it was posted last month prior to the Wright Bros. celebration. It was never announced then. It's going to be a long time until things happen. My guess, at least 10 to 2o years... or even longer.
     
  15. CharlesD

    CharlesD Screenwriter

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    I don't like the sound of that. Does this apply to unmanned missions such as further orbiters/landers at Mars? Does it apply to JIMO or the next generation space telescope?
     
  16. TylerN

    TylerN Stunt Coordinator

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    Yet, still no cure for cancer.
     
  17. Bryan X

    Bryan X Producer

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    Special lighting technology developed for plant-growth experiments on Space Shuttle missions is now used to treat brain tumors in children. Doctors at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee use
    light-emitting diodes in a treatment called photodynamic therapy, a form of chemotherapy, to kill cancerous tumors.

    So, if you are looking to advance medicine, look no further than the space program. Here are a FEW of the advances in medicine developed directly from our space program:

    Kidney dialysis, which keeps countless people alive, came from the Apollo program. A new heart pump came from technology used in the Space Shuttle. CAT and MRI. Arteriosclerosis detection, ultrasound scanners, the automatic insulin pump, the portable x-ray device, bone analyzers, and cataract surgery tools all came from the space program.

    There's much more. Thousands and thousands of people owe their very lives (and quality of life) to the space program - including my wife.
     
  18. BrianShort

    BrianShort Supporting Actor

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    CharlesD: That was one of the statements that worried me as well. I'm hoping it means manned space efforts, such as space station research that has nothing to do with people living in space. Although if that was the case, it might piss of some of the other countries that are going to have labs on the station. Still, I really hope they're not talking about unmanned probes. As much as I want humans on Mars, I don't want them to sacrifice the robotic missions that will make discoveries just as great. The ohter statement that worried me was:

    What, exactly, would be the point of this? We have orbiters that can recon the planet already, and another one with 30cm/pixel resolution is scheduled to be launched in 2005. If we want to test the long term reliability of mission hardware, we can do that in earth orbit, or on the moon.

    Time for the MER update!

    Brian
     
  19. TylerN

    TylerN Stunt Coordinator

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    I now realize how truly aloof I am to the subject! Thanks for this.
     
  20. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    If you're referring to sheer tonnage -- i.e., the weight of the remaining Orbiters -- then you're statement is correct. If, however, you are speaking figuratively, then I fail to see how three grounded Orbiters (Atlantis, Discovery, and Endeavour) amount to "tons of shuttles."

    As for Project Apollo having achieved its goal in only eight years, you must remember that the first manned lunar program was a crash effort, a "flags-and-footprints" enterprise. The new proposal requires the implementation of a permanent infrastructure that can support longterm, permanent manned exploration of the near Solar System. Its first beachhead is the Moon, followed later (probably much later) by flights beyond cislunar space (to Near Earth Objects as well as Mars).

    So, accomplishing a permanent human presence beyond low Earth orbit requires more time. In all, a truly methodical approach.

    And Andrew Testa, should you be reading this, I am now a solid convert to the idea of a "Orbital Space Plane" that is, in truth, a variation on the "capsule" concept.

    Looking forward to your input, please.
     

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