premiere time limit?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Christ Reynolds, Jun 4, 2003.

  1. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    i'm working on a project in adobe premiere 6, and my project length is about 3.5 hours long or so, but i cant place any more clips in the timeline past 3 hours. anyone know if this is a limit within premiere, or a setting i need to change? ive looked around for a setting, no luck so far. thanks in advance

    CJ
     
  2. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    Holy macral! What kind of files are you editing (what codec are they using)? If 3hrs is the limit you could always edit up to the 3hr mark, then create a new project for the remaining 30 minutes. Then join the two together using a video joining program.
     
  3. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    i'm making DVDs of the upright citizens brigade. each episode is 22 minutes long, x10 per season is 3.66 hours. i would make 2 different projects and then join them together, but i'm worried about audio synching problems. if they would only release the seasons on dvd, i wouldnt even have to worry about this, argh! i even went through the trouble of making title cards for each episode in photoshop, i want this to be at least semi-professional looking. i hear premiere 6.5 has dvd authoring, is it worth upgrading to? $149 is steep right about now though, i just want to do this for as cheaply as possible, and i have access to 6.0 now, i was thinking maybe 6.5 would have a longer timeline length. anyone know?

    CJ
     
  4. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    ok searching through the premiere forums, i found that the timeline in premiere, 6.0 and 6.5, is 3 hours. i asked if there was anything i could to in order to increase it, and the guy said "sure, you can buy Avid." even though i am aware of the program he is talking about, i want so badly to quote the immortal Dignan, and ask "what do you mean by avid?"

    CJ
     
  5. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    Avid is the system that most TV shows and movies are edited on. BIG bucks

    Honestly, you're not going to fit more than 2 hours on a single DVD, so just cut the project in half and do it that way.

    6.5 doesn't have longer timeline, no one really needs it and anyone who does just does 2 projects.
     
  6. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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  7. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  8. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    My question is: Why do you need all of them on one time line? Why not make separate timelines for each episode?
     
  9. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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  10. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Premiere 6.5 has direct to MPEG2 encoding now. [​IMG] No need to render out an AVI file and then recompress it for DVD.

    Although I don't know if you can use the "batch" method to do more than one project.
     
  11. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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  12. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    You can have the best of both worlds to an extent by making two seperate movies with the individual episodes as chapters. Then the WORST that could happen is that when you get to the end of the fifth episode, you go back to the menu and start with episode 6.

    It's obviously not going to let you go through all ten at once, but only having to select from the main menu twice (once for 1-5 and once for 6-10) sure as hell beats ten times by having to select each episode. (Are you listening, 20th Century Fox?!!!!!)
     
  13. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    i'm going to try to make 2 seperate movies and then join them together, and then author the movie, which will be 10 episodes, as one big title, and each episode being one chapter. i would take ken's advice, but i'm not sure i have access to a multi-title program. the seamless play all option would work in my planned out scenario, hopefully it will work. i suppose i should think about windows XP file size limits, i never had to think about it yet. it has to be beyond 40gb, because i had a 40gb avi file on my hard disk this morning. i'm guessing its way above that though. the old one was 2gb, and given the way exponential math works, i'd say its much higher. 2gb is 2^28, i think...anyway i'm thinking out loud now...or typing out loud.

    CJ
     
  14. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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    I know that Jeff Kleist and other will just roll their eyes at me, but Ulead's Media Studio Pro does not have a limitation on how long a project can be. As I mentioned earlier, it allowed me to make a single MPEG-1 file that was 4 hours and 45 minutes in length that I then burned to an MPEG-1 DVD; and it's had DVD-ready MPEG-2 support built into it for over two years.

    If this is something that you're going to be doing more than once, you might want to consider using MSP instead of Premiere.

     
  15. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  16. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    Once you have passed the 2 (or 4) GB AVI limit the next limit you may run into is in hardware: 137 GB per drive. You need an ATA-133 (or Serial ATA) controller to get past that one. (Note that you can use a pre-133 RAID of two 120 GB drives to get 240 GB, for example. This also has the benefit of higher throughput, which is very helpful for these huge files. Of course, if you use RAID 0, you are doubling the chance for data loss, because if either drive goes down, you're hosed.)

    //Ken
     
  17. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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