Pre-AVIA calibration checklist ...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill_Boston, Feb 19, 2003.

  1. Bill_Boston

    Bill_Boston Stunt Coordinator

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    I plan to utilize the AVIA calibration DVD/software to optimize my Home Theater system this weekend. Specifically, my Sony KV-36XBR400 TV with my Sony DVP-NS00P Progressive Scan DVD player and Bose Lifestyle 12 (Dolby Digital). I have some pre-AVIA calibration/optimization questions ...

    Before I being to use the AVIA software, I want to ensure that my TV and DVD settings are set properly. I have some questions:

    TV:

    IN the "Movie" set-up, what color temperature should I set my TV to (warm, neutral, or cold) ???

    Are there any specific/recommended adjustments to be made to the TV via the TV's "service mode" (red push, etc.) ???

    DVD:

    What internal setting should I make to my DVD player ??? Are there any specific output settings (warm color, for example), that I should be aware of ???

    Any other information regarding pre-AVIA optimization would be greatly appreciated.

    THANKS.

    Kind regards,
    Bill
     
  2. Gregg Loewen

    Gregg Loewen Video Standards Instructor, THX Ltd.
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    hi

    with NTSC the warm mode should be 6500 but never is. Probably try normal mode.

    Yes your set has a red push. I cant remember if it is a Axis control or full color decoder adjustments (Im sure somebody else will chime in).

    Usually, put your DVD player to standard or normal mode, with any user adjustments centered.

    regards

    Gregg
     
  3. Bryce Miner

    Bryce Miner Stunt Coordinator

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    To start off

    TV: Use "Pro" mode and set temp to warm. You will find that very close to avia 5 user adjustments. Have you been in the service menu before?

    The grayscale even at warm is just way too blue, you won't be able to fix that without a ISF calibrator to visit your house. You may not notice it until you actually see what a true d6500 kelvin image looks like.

    For your DVD.
    Set it up as 16x9 that way you can take advantage of the anamorphic squeeze from your tv. (more resolution) You want to select bitstream for the audio.
     
  4. Bill_Boston

    Bill_Boston Stunt Coordinator

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    As far as entering my TV's Service Mode ... no, I've never attempted this; however, I do feel comfortable enough entering ino this mode and making adjustments. Although I don't have the highest-end TV on the market, I would like to get my TV to replicate a true movie experience (from a videophile perspective) as best as possible ... even if it means adjusting service-related "switches".

    Thanks for all the help.
     
  5. Todd K

    Todd K Second Unit

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    Judging by this thread, am I to understand that AVIA will not help you adjust your color temperature?

    I have been reading through old and new threads on the forum lately, and up until now I was under the impression that you should set to "warm," because it is the closest to NTSC standard.

    However, since this give the picture a more reddish appearance, and if a TV already has the red push, wouldn't this be a bad thing?

    Todd
     
  6. ManW_TheUncool

    ManW_TheUncool Producer

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    The correct NTSC color temp will look red to you if you're used to seeing a bluish color temp, which is usually the case w/ pre-calibrated TVs.

    Yes, generally, you would want to fix any red push along w/ correcting the color temp. The red push is used to help compensate for the bluish color temp.

    If they designed the TV well, they should automatically reduce red push along w/ correcting color temp.

    _Man_
     
  7. Todd K

    Todd K Second Unit

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    Ok, to clear things up -- I own the Wega KV32FS13. I'm sure I'll understand this more when I actually get a calibration disc of my own. I came across this comment in an old thread by Guy Kuo:

     
  8. Bryce Miner

    Bryce Miner Stunt Coordinator

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    Yes the color and hue controls will need to be readjusted with each color temp. You will be able to see this when you get your disc. Adjust color and tint, then change the color temp: cool, neutral, and warm while holding up the blue filter for adjusting color and tint. The change might not be that huge. Maybe one or two clicks. The biggest difference would be with an accurate D6500 Kelvin grayscale from 0-100 Ire. If you switched between the "Industry" grayscale versus the "sony" grayscale you'll see a bigger difference. Let alone red push will be more apparent with an accurate grayscale. Not a sea of blue glossed over with over emphasis on red saturation. Flesh tones are a huge change, from "sony" to "Industry" look.

    The "Sony" gray is tinted red, green or blue. It isn't black and white, it's dark blue light blue.

    The "Industry" gray is gray. Black and White.

    You should focus on the Picture, Black Level, Color, Hue and Sharpness first when you get your disc. Then you can look into having your grayscale accurately adjusted later on.
     

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