Power output question

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Jeff_A_G, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Jeff_A_G

    Jeff_A_G Stunt Coordinator

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    What is the difference in real power out put between something like a $300 HK that claims 40w per channel and a $300 Denon that claims 100W per channel?
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    1 to 2 channels driven continuously, closer to their ratings, all channels driven continuously probably 20 to 30 watts at most.

    Do not get to hung up on this one, because HT really doesn't even come close to driving all channels continuously, so in reality you end up getting very close to published results while running DD/DTS on any given system.
     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    H/K tends to be realistic about its ratings, so when they say 40W, the MEAN 40W, without question. [​IMG]

    Make sure you look for the "fine print" for any receiver that says 100W - if it is rated at 1Khz only, that is an indicator to me that it won't deliver it's claimed power when fed a full range signal.

    As John notes, the "claimed" power is often the 2ch rating, not with all channels driven.
     
  4. Jeff_A_G

    Jeff_A_G Stunt Coordinator

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    a lot of the 6.1 receivers claim like 100w x 6. The HK claims 40w x 6. I'm assuming its just more of a realistic power claim? I'll start paying more attention to the signal range too. Thanks for the help on this one. Also, on a denon that claims 110w x 6, what would it actually put out? Would it be around the 40w of the HK or less?
     
  5. Shiu

    Shiu Second Unit

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    HK "claims" their power output conservatively. That does not mean their 40W X 6 equals 100W X 6. Many brands, including Denon, "claims" their power output more aggressively. That does not mean their 110 W X 6 actually gives you only 40 W X 6.

    If you believe in AV magazines such as the S&V and H.T mag., read their lab measurements yourself. If you don't believe them, then you may have to listen for yourself and do your own power output verification tests. Regarding the 1 kHz vs 20 to 20KHz power, the difference is typically not great. The 20 to 20,000 Hz output may be 10 to 15% lower.
     
  6. Alan Wise

    Alan Wise Stunt Coordinator

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    To me, receiver manufacturers power ratings are similar to what the automobile manufacturers do. It is mostly advertising hype. The mine is bigger, better, more powerful, etc..., than yours is game. What really counts is what is the power to the rear wheels. You know, after all parasitic (spelling?) losses are taken into acount. In the receiver world, it is what actually makes it to the speakers. I look at the magazine, or Secrets, tests as the receiver version of Car Craft, or Hot Rod Magazines 1/4 mile tests. A true "run what you brung, and hope that you brung enough" test is my favorite.

    Al. Wise
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    That would be nice, but the vast majority of cars out there are front wheel drive. [​IMG] How much power is getting to the ground is maybe a more clear statement, and that figure means a lot more to me than what the motor is rated for. I much prefer RWD cars.

    With recivers, the "run what you brung" sums it up pretty well. If you hook it up to a decent speaker and give it a listen at various volumes, the true nature of how much power is actually present is clear.
     

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