power conditioner / regulator

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Burklund, Aug 16, 2004.

  1. Burklund

    Burklund Stunt Coordinator

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    Is a conditioner/regulator in anyway a problem for a receiver? Will it prevent the amps from getting the power that it needs?
    I'm not talking about a surge protector strip....I'm talking about a Tripp-lite or other brand device that regulates and conditions the current going to your equipment.

    I dont have a system yet, but before I do get one I want to buy some protection for it !!
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Is a conditioner/regulator in anyway a problem for a receiver?

    It's extremely doubtful that it is. By and large, the amount of RFI on an AC line is fairly neglible anyways and what remains is taken care of by competently designed equipment via appropriate circuitry. Attenuating RFI or EMI is fairly easy and inexpensive to do though, so you'll find it on lots of things like plug-in surge suppressers.

    Will it prevent the amps from getting the power that it needs?

    If you've got a problem driving your speakers to the volumes you like without distortion or maybe the bass starts getting 'muddy', then your solution does not lie in buying one of the 'we don't limit current' crop of stuff out there. Try an amp with some balls.

    I'm not talking about a surge protector strip....I'm talking about a Tripp-lite or other brand device that regulates and conditions the current going to your equipment.

    Again, while there may be some voltage drop during demanding passages, its small. You'll notice that somewhere in the manual it might say something like that its designed to meet its performance specifications under a certain range of voltages. So much of one reads is designed to put the fear of the boogy-man and monster under the bed in the mind of people. If you've got your own home then look into whole-house surge protection and just buy some comparatively inexpensive plug in devices to put here and there. If you've got a paranoia about RFI, then find a source of ferrite plugs and beads and snap them around your cables and cords. Plenty of online sources.

    I dont have a system yet, but before I do get one I want to buy some protection for it !!

    Indeed! Better to think this out now rather than being hit at the checkout counter by some salesman who is going to point you to products whose claim to fame is more profit margin than substance. Why don't you focus for now on your upcoming system and take the time to find the speakers you want to live with? Plug in protection can be fairly inexpensive although in terms of effectiveness it pales miserably to whole house. Lets direct your money to where it will do the most good. Speakers always sound like the right place to start.
     
  3. Kevin. W

    Kevin. W Screenwriter

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    Build your system first before deciding on what level of protection you need. No need to spend big $$$ on conditioning/regulatation of the voltage for a setup worth a fraction of the cost. Personally I use a Monster HTS5000mkII Power conditioner and Monster AVS2000 voltage regulator to offer my setup the cleanest stress free voltage available

    Kevin
     
  4. Burklund

    Burklund Stunt Coordinator

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    I can get a tripp-lite for under $100, so I'm not going to be spending a fortune on protection.
    How much was your Monster?
     
  5. Jason Brent

    Jason Brent Second Unit

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    Hello Chu,

    As a recognized expert around here, what do you recommend for apartment dwellers? I don't have a lot....RPTV, receiver, SVS, and DVD player.

    I ashamedly[​IMG] am plugged directly into the wall. To make things worse, I have recently relocated to FL where we have lightning EVERY day. Power seems to flicker at least once or twice a week, and sometimes more.
     
  6. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Another perspective:
    My thoughts here are, are you sure you really need it? If you have reliable power in your neighborhood, you may not. I’ve never used surge protectors and I’ve never had an equipment failure that I could attribute to a power problem. However, I’ve always lived in suburban subdivisions where the power service is underground, which makes it less susceptible to lightning strikes. (Don’t ever think a surge protector will protect you from a direct lightning hit, by the way).

    Such was not the case with a good friend of mine. Every couple of years some piece of electronics he had would develop some bizarre problem or die outright. The place where he lived had overhead utility service. Eight years ago he moved to a subdivision with underground power, and the only failure he’s had since then was a VCR that was probably going to die of old age anyway.

    The point is, if your experiences tell you that you have questionable electrical service where you live, or if you live an area plagued by lightning storms or frequent outages, then by all means get some protection. I certainly would.

    If not, then peace of mind may be the only benefit you receive. Not that I would discount that. [​IMG]

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  7. Burklund

    Burklund Stunt Coordinator

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    Thats something that never crossed my mind....making sure that the Tripp-lite and the electronic devices I have plugged into the Tripp-lite have the same size cord. But would that really matter? I could see if I have something that really pulled alot of Amps...like a large motor, but a TV, DVD player, receiver ?????
     
  8. Burklund

    Burklund Stunt Coordinator

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    http://www.tripplite.com/products/co...ners/index.cfm

    go here and look at these Tripp-lite line conditioners. Please let me know if one of these will be usefull to protect a TV, DVD player, VCR, DirecTV receiver, and HT receiver.


    Thanks for your input on this subject !!
     
  9. TimRP

    TimRP Stunt Coordinator

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    Burkland, if you are interested in a Furman Rack Rider power conditioner, I have one forsale...pm me.
     
  10. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Wayne, I was looking to address those devices that have things like inductors wired in series insofar as the idea of 'current limiting' goes.

    Its tough for apartment dwellers. Some buildings though do have facility wide surge protection and the curious sort might want to ask their building management about that.

    Probably the best first step you can take is to make sure you've got renter's insurance that covers your equipment for full replacement and none of that pro-rated stuff against electrical damage. Usually, such policies also protect you for fire, theft, and even accidents like cat piss. The type and extent of protection varies from company to company so just shop this around and choose what seems to be the best plan for you.

    If you're an MOV type person, then look at units that have high joule ratings, lets say in the 3000 range and above. That means they've got bigger MOV's and this increases their lifespan in a geometric sense. Any device you consider should have provisions to allow all your equipment to be hooked up into it as well as the incoming cable. Depending upon the frequencies that the cable passes you may need to ask a few questions of your cable company and the manufacturer to ensure there's no problems with bandwidth limitations. Remember, your entire HT system's first point of entry has to be the surge protector otherwise you risk something coming in the back door. A low cost leader here is Stratitec which can be bought at Sam's Club for under $20 or around $25 at Directron.com. Other brands are Panamax, TrippLite, Belkin, etc.

    Now, if you happen to have a concern, unfounded or not, about equipment being able to radiate stuff back down the AC cords and 'contaminate' other equipment that's attached, then look at the Belkin Isolators or the TrippLite Isobars. They've got RFI/EMI filters in between adjacent outlets and its a cumulative effect so the pair of outlets at the far end has more attenuation of 'junk' than the ones nearest the power cord. The thinking here is that you'd put your TV at the far end and then anything that's got a switching power supply at the other.

    If you happen to not be an MOV type person then you'll be looking at either a BrickWall, Adcom, Surge-x if you like the series mode, bank of capacitors approach. They're pricey though but do a very good job of dealing with noise glitches on the AC line simply by virtue of their capacitors. Otherwise, devices based on Silicon Avalanche Diodes are very good and offer faster response than MOV's by about an order of magnitude. PS Audio sells that type but they call them transorbs instead of SAD's. A very competent unit can be found at Transtector (search under my name for that and get more info) but as far as I know you've got to buy direct. If you decide to investigate them, call them and speak to an applications engineer. Last guy I talked with was August and he's a very bright person.

    The whole point of this is for you to develop your own short list to choose from not for me or somebody else to tell you what to buy. There's way more brands than I've listed here. This is only a starting point. The way I figure it is if you've got a decent idea of what to look for, then you're empowered enough to make a sensible shopping decision that's right for you. Ask good questions, don't settle for bullshit answers, and don't worry about what the other guy bought.
     
  11. Gabriela Mendez

    Gabriela Mendez Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi there,

    I just bough an Energizer ER-HM450 battery backup / voltage regulator. It worked great since I was having my 36 inch HDTV wobbling. Not only was the wobbling solved, but the picture and sound quality were way much better. I compared to connecting it to regular sockets and it did make a difference. This also has software plus a USB connection for your PC to keep an update of voltage specs (I think). I use it to connect my TV, AMP, Receiver, 2 DVD players. Not sure if this was intended for Home entertainment systems, but overall a major improvement.
     
  12. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    The Energizer ER-HM450 is a UPS that allows for a computer system to be shut down gracefully (provided you've loaded the software and hooked it up to the PC) in the event of a power outage. Surge protection is quite minimal at 384 joules. No information that I could find is provided as to whether this protection is across the L-N, L-G, G-N lines nor does it appear to have a UL 1449 listing strongly suggesting that that its effectiveness in dealing with a surge is dubious. Further there is no mention of EMI/RFI suppression indicating that such capabilities are beyond the scope of this product. Its interesting to note that not all the outlets though have the provision of battery backup as can be seen in this picture.

    [​IMG]

    While you may've been told the product is a voltage regulator the product does not provide this capability. Its sole purpose is to provide sufficient power for a sufficiently long enough time to allow a modest computer system to power down.

    That your reception problems with your TV may now be a thing of the past strongly suggests that something else other than the use of this product is responsible.
     

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