Poster framing dos and don'ts

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jeff Ulmer, May 23, 2003.

  1. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 1998
    Messages:
    5,584
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I may finally be getting around to buying frames for the small collection of original and reproduction one sheets I have, and am looking for advice on what I should and shouldn't be looking at. I don't have a huge budget for this, so getting too crazy isn't going to work, but I would like some simple frames that won't damage the posters I have. None of these are really that expensive ($7-30 off ebay), but I don't want to have them fade or be damaged unnecessarily.

    I will probably want to be able to change the posters out on occasion, so nothing permanent. I am also into a minimalist approach when it comes to the frame - small black or even frameless would be options.

    I know I need an acid free backing material, but some have suggested foam core, so is that a viable option.

    I am also wondering about going with UV glass. These won't be in any direct sunlight, so I don't know if that's a factor or not.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2001
    Messages:
    2,224
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    spray mount them first or else they will start sagging within the frame and develop wrinkles...looks terrible too

    spray mount: can of 3M Super Spray 77, spray back of poster, carefully mount it to carboard or matboard using a brayer or some sort of rolling device, x-acto the excess cardboard, and then frame it.
     
  3. Randy Tennison

    Randy Tennison Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Randy
    One big don't . . . Don't put the poster directly against the glass. Leave some space for the poster to "breathe", and it won't wrinkle so badly. I was told this by a movie poster dealer. My idea was to buy some "spline" used to rescreen screen doors, and place that between the poster and glass, under the frame so it was hidden.

    Go to your local Hobby Lobby, or Michaels, and buy the modular black frames. You buy the sides and top seperate, get glass and foam core cut to size, take it home, assemble it (very easy) and VOILA. They look great.

    You can get an idea of what mine looked like (a few years ago) here
     
  4. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 1999
    Messages:
    3,518
    Likes Received:
    1,110
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Peter Apruzzese
    Please don't spray-mount or dry-mount the posters unless you don't care about their value. Those processes are irreversible and damaging to the paper (most dry-mounted posters begin yellowing, buckling and wrinkling in about 10 years), and most collectors will not buy them except at fire sale prices. If you have any valuable posters, consider getting them linen-backed instead (around $50-75 for a one-sheet).

    Foam core is a good safe backing and Randy is correct about not letting them touch the glass if possible. If you can afford it, go for the UV glass. Indirect sunlight and many common household lights cast UV waves, so for a couple of bucks extra, play it safe.
     
  5. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 1998
    Messages:
    5,584
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah, I'm not planning on gluing these to anything, as although they aren't overly valuable, they are collectable.
     
  6. Chuck C

    Chuck C Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2001
    Messages:
    2,224
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    btw, don't glue them to anything [​IMG]
     
  7. Josh Lowe

    Josh Lowe Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2002
    Messages:
    1,063
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have a really cool 40x30 movie poster for The Limey that I want to get matted and framed in the best way possible. I plan on hanging it in my living room over the TV. I want it to last forever or as close to it as possible. Any suggestions on how to do this? I'm not really a "do it yourself" type and don't want to learn by experimenting on a really niece piece of art that I want to preserve. Can I trust a place like Michael's to do the job or should I look somewhere more specialized?
     
  8. Carl Miller

    Carl Miller Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    1,461
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Josh, for what you're looking for I'd recommend going to a regular framer and having it done. I have a large collection of vintage rock & roll posters. I just started learning to frame myself so hopefully down the road I'll be doing my own framing for everything.

    But for now, any poster that is either valuable or that I'd like to last as close to forever as possible, I have professionally done.

    The problem with using a Michaels type place is that 1) You don't know for sure how good/reputable the person doing the framing is and 2) You never discover poor or shoddy work until it's too late.

    So if your poster has value, take it to a professional framer whose been used by people you know. Have it archivally framed with acid free matting, UV glass, mylar spacers and ask the framer for a pair of frame pads to stick on the bottom of the frame so that no part of the picture lays flush on the wall.
     
  9. Jonathan Burk

    Jonathan Burk Second Unit

    Joined:
    May 31, 1999
    Messages:
    452
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Location:
    Castaic, CA
    Real Name:
    Jonathan Burk
    Two things:

    -Acid free foamcore for the backing (~$10 at a craft store like Michael's)

    -UV resistant plexiglass (~$45 for a 27"x41" sheet)

    I recommend frames from American Frame. They have everything, and for a great price. Very easy to assemble, they look incredible, and they last forever. No need for a professional framer.

    You can have easy to assemble museum quality frames for
     
  10. Carl Miller

    Carl Miller Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2002
    Messages:
    1,461
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Paper should never be in direct contact with glass or any other type of glazing such as plexiglass according to archival standards adhered to by museums and paper preservationists.

    High or changing humidity can lead to condensation on the inside of the glass or plexiglass and that can cause mold, mildew, spots or even the image getting stuck to the glass. This is less likely to happen with UV Plexi than it is glass, but it's still possible and does happen.

    For smaller pieces, Mylar spacers to keep the posters off the glass are well worth the investment at a whopping 50 cents each. For larger pieces like movie posters, matting serves the same purpose more effectively.

    I've been traveling around the NY Metro area for 10 years looking at and sometimes buying collections of rock posters. I can't tell you how many posters I've taken out of their frames to discover this type of damage and nobody was more surprised to see it than the owner.
     
  11. Tim_Speicher

    Tim_Speicher Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2001
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    10
     
  12. Randy Tennison

    Randy Tennison Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 1999
    Messages:
    1,099
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Randy
    Tim,
    No, I don't have any close up pictures (my digital camera was from an old job, so I don't have one to take pictures with now).

    I am using common spline, I don't remember the width. You might want to see how much gap (play) you have when you put it together, and then get some spline that sized.
     

Share This Page