Polyurethane (Gorilla) Glue Questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Robert_CA, Mar 10, 2003.

  1. Robert_CA

    Robert_CA Stunt Coordinator

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    Has anyone used this product in their MDF box construction instead of Tite-Bond, Elmer's, etc? Did anyone encounter any problems with Gorilla glue since the surfaces have to be moistened to activate the it? Does it make for a better bond than the carpenter's wood glues IYO?[​IMG]
     
  2. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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    I used it on my A/V-1s and stands. Did not have any problem with the moister and MDF. You do not soak the MDF, just a VERY light mist. I moistened my finger and just lightly touched the MDF. Also if there is a lot of humidity in the air, you don't even have to moisten the MDF.

    IMHO it's not worth the extra cost over TiteBond II. And the shelf life after opening is way too short! I went back to Titebond II for my sub and center channel.

    The only benifit it might have over Titebond II is sealing poorly cut joints that have gaps...


    Ronnie
     
  3. John E Janowitz

    John E Janowitz Second Unit

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    Robert,

    We typically use Gorilla glue to assemble enclosures. The main advantage is that it expands to seal all gaps in the wood. It will give you air tight joints in cases where regular wood glue may not.

    I do suggest staying away from the titebond and elmers probond brands of polyurethane glue. Even when moistening the mdf here, both of these dry and are very brittle. While they expand to fill the gaps, the glue joints themselves seemed to be able to break apart very easily. With Gorilla glue, I had no problems like this.

    John
     
  4. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Robert, I have to respectfully disagree with Mr. Janowitz, who is one of the subwoofer gurus from who I continue to learn. I've been building cabinets and speakers for many years and you can't beat the "carpenter's" glues (Titebond and Elmers). They are actually alephatic resins - polyvinyl acetate (PVA) to be exact. The caveat for success, however, is that you must have straight, 90-degree accurate saw cuts so that your joints have no gaps. Gap-free joints and carpenters glue make for plenty of strength. I guess I'll throw in my usual disdain for screws - they're a waste of money, time and sweat.
    Now if you don't have an accurate table saw and you have some gaps in your joints, then the polyurethane glues, like Gorilla, are excellent because as Jon noted, they expand while curing, and fill those gaps. They're also good for internal bracing, where you might not have full, parallel contact between the end of a brace and a cabinet panel.
     
  5. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Hank,

    If you re-read John's post, he isn't saying to stay away from the Titebond and Elmers carpenter's glue, but their polyurethane glue.
     
  6. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

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    :b I did the same thing as Hank and misread that post. I was like "what do you mean, stay away from Titebond, I love the stuff!"

    Thanks for pointing that out Brian! [​IMG]

    FYI: I have only used Gorilla and not Titebond or Elmers brand of polyurethane glue. I'll make a mental note to stay away from them.

    And thanks Hank for the hint for using Gorilla Glue for gluing in braces. That would be a good use for it! I always have to come up with some sort or "creative" clamping when it comes to braces. I never feel like I get real good pressure along the full brace. Gorilla glue would be perfect in this situation!

    It there anyway to extend the open shelf life of Gorilla glue. I just don't use the stuff fast enough, and usually waste 1/2 a bottle because it is dried up the next time I go to use it. This is the main reason I went back to Titbond II. I have a 2 year old bottle of Titebond II that still glues strong joints!


    Ronnie
     
  7. another [​IMG] for Gorilla glue. usrdit many times with good success.

    How to improve the shelf life: Minimize the amount of H2O vapor in the bottle=> minimizing the amount of air in the bottol=> get creative on removing the excess air from the bottle when you are done with the glue [​IMG]
     
  8. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    My bad[​IMG] Brian, do you only surface to correct us? [​IMG]
    I used one of the other polyurethanes and it worked as well as Gorilla, but that was only on a short portion of a joint, so I didn't notice it being worse than Gorilla. Interesting that only one of three brands of polyurethane works. Oh well, I use very little of it ($$!!), so I keep the smallest bottle so it won't dry out on me.
     
  9. And hank only surfaces to point out Brian's faults....and for a chance at some "tequla" [​IMG].
     
  10. Robert_CA

    Robert_CA Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for your input everyone. You've been a great help. I will begin construction on my 214L Tempest in two weeks. [​IMG]
     

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