Please tell me if this sounds stupid

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Allan_Lim, Sep 15, 2002.

  1. Allan_Lim

    Allan_Lim Agent

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm planning on purchasing a new computer in the next 4 - 6 weeks. I plan on getting a DVD-ROM, CD-RW, lots of RAM and 2 fairly sizable hard drives. One hard drive for system files and programs, the 2nd just to store music on.

    I'm thinking of getting a 100GB hard drive for the music and ripping files in WAV format and leaving them on the hard disc as I like to listen to music while I use the computer.

    Here's my question, is it worthwhile getting a separate DAC and getting a sound card with a S/P DIF input/output to feed into the DAC? I have a Linn Classik that I'll be using with the setup.

    Is this overkill and a waste of money? Should I just go with a CL or Turtle Beach sound card and use the DAC's on there and save some bucks?
     
  2. Mark Hsieh

    Mark Hsieh Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2002
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    You could always buy one big hard drive (I think the 320gb's are coming out soon) and make 3 partitions: 1 for system files, 1 for programs, and 1 for music. Also, you can save hard drive space by encoding in OGG Vorbis format, which gives way better quality than mp3 imo.
     
  3. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    there's no point in ripping them to WAV, they're still compressed, so all you're doing is increasing the file size by a factor of 10
     
  4. Andre F

    Andre F Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2000
    Messages:
    1,486
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sorry not too many thoughts on the sound card, but I would get one drive (saves you money and you can always get a second one later). I just got a new PC with a 120GB drive and have two partitions. One for programs and system files and the other for data which includes my MP3 collection. I was considering three partitions but came to the conclusion that if I keep a nice and organized file stucture in place it does the job just as well as another partition and is easier to maintain.
     
  5. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0


    Uh, what?

    Wav files aren't compressed. Wav is complete PCM data (actually it is essentially identical- however has it's own header and footer data). There is no "compression' applied- no information is cast aside from the original waveform.

    -Vince
     
  6. Allan_Lim

    Allan_Lim Agent

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wav files are compressed????

    That's the first I've ever heard.

    I thought digital audio extraction on CD-ROM's allowed one to extract the audio bit for bit onto the hard drive.

    What am I not understanding here?
     
  7. John Parris

    John Parris Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wav files certainly ARE NOT compressed. Let's put a knife in that one right now. Wav files are bit-for-bit identical to the PCM data on the CD as far as I understand it.

    Anyway, as far as hard drives, I would rather have a smaller SCSI drive and one large (80GB+) IDE drive... but thats not nessasary for your purposes. For you, I say go with which ever is cheaper: two hard drives or one large one... if it would be cheaper to partition one large one, then by all means... but the smaller hard drives are getting cheaper and cheaper.

    I highly recommend you download CDex and try the Ogg Vorbis codecs... try encoding your songs at maximum quality and see how you like the SQ compared to CDs... could save some serious space compared to PCM wav files.
     
  8. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 7, 1999
    Messages:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    110
    For the few extra bucks I'd get 2 7200 RPM drives. Less platters mean quicker access time, and if one goes down you've still got another...

    Brent
     
  9. Mark Hsieh

    Mark Hsieh Agent

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2002
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If he's just listening to music, technically he won't need SCSI or 7200 RPM drives, but since 7200 is pretty much standard(in desktops), I guess he doesn't have much of a choice, but then again the 7200 would be better for a larger hard drive.

    Just encode in Ogg Vorbis at the highest quality (Ogg Vorbis tries to stay away from encoding bits) and you'll have cd quality music (you can't really tell past 5 or if you've got really good ears, 6) at a fraction of the space of your wave files.
     
  10. Allan_Lim

    Allan_Lim Agent

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    One thing that I didn't clarify that well is would the digital out from the sound card be good enough to be worth the effort/cost of a separate DAC?

    Does anyone have comments on this?

    I likely will not go SCSI for cost reasons.

    Based on the replies, I think I'll get a 60 GB drive for now and get a larger 120GB drive when the 300+GB drives come out and push down the cost of the 120GB ones.
     
  11. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0


    It's an interesting question- and one I don't have a definite answer to. The issue will come down to a core question of converters and possible interference inside the PC case.

    On the first front, you can certainly buy a good card with top quality audio converters- probably for about the same price a D/A conversion in an outboard unit would cost. I highly recommend the ECHO Mia card- it is a very well regarded card in the studio audio world. I have a Gina interface for my project audio PC (demos and whatnot)- and the MIA uses the same 24 bit converters and is simply a 2 channel version. It also has a SPDIF output that is very clean.

    The second issue of RF is one that will vary greatly. Some cards inside a PC case are really hurt by RF interference- so having a outboard D/A conversion stage might be key. However- the RF might also have effects on the digital audio data being passed- so it's a gamble either way.

    If it were my decision to make, i'd probably go with the MIA and convert inside the PC- just because I have been happy with their products in the past and haven't had RF problems. BUt, RF problems are certainly possible.

    -Vince
     
  12. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 1999
    Messages:
    11,267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My point was that if you're using your PC as an MP3 player, there's no point in ripping out to WAV. Obviously I misread
     
  13. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

    Joined:
    May 17, 1999
    Messages:
    2,358
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
     
  14. John Parris

    John Parris Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2002
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wayne-- I think we're all talking about PCM Wav files here... 16/44.1 would just be the standard ripping from a CD...
    I would almost certainly go with an outboard D/A transfered via S/PDIF... I think you'd get far less noise in application than with a really good high-end card's D/A... either would probably be great, but my preference is always to keep analog out of the way of all the nasty electronic work going on in my PC. [​IMG]
     

Share This Page