PLEASE - help me choose a TV, RPTV, or FPTV!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by RandyL, Sep 11, 2001.

  1. RandyL

    RandyL Agent

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    [​IMG]
    That's the room. It's not QUITE to scale - the top wall, which is about 13 feet long, has the gas fireplace in the middle which is about 5 feet wide. So the walls to either side are a bit less than 4' each.
    The problem? There are in-wall and in-ceiling speakers which I'd LOVE to utilize, but they basically make you put the TV right where the gas fireplace is!
    PLEASE help me think of a solution! The wife-acceptance-factor is mucho importante [​IMG]
    Some ideas I've thought of:
    1) Put a plasma / LCD TV on the mantle above the fireplace. It's about 4.5 feet off the ground then, and I think that is just too high, don't you?
    2) Some sort of FPTV where I mount the screen to the bottom of the mantle and retract it when not in use, and when pulled down it covers the fireplace. Problem here is - the image would be almost on the floor, and I'd have to get a projector which I've had and are too loud. If I get a CRT projector (which can be silent I've heard) I worry about my cats messing them up [​IMG]
    3) RPTV on wheels which I leave in the corner and wheel into position afront the fireplace when we want to watch it. Just get video cables 10' longer than I need.
    ??? What else? What should I do? I hate this room but it's all I have until I finish the basement in a few years. I'm willing to spend a few $$$ but want this solution to be 'perfect'.
    [Edited last by RandyL on September 11, 2001 at 10:15 PM]
     
  2. Dwight Amato

    Dwight Amato Stunt Coordinator

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    You have a very tough situation. I know how you feel, my setup sucks as well. I think one big problem is the amount of light you will have coming into your room from your sliding glass door. If you can control that light, and I mean make it really dark in there, then perhaps you can get by with a FPTV. An easier solution would be a RPTV, but I don't know how much fun it would be to slide it around. I bet you would do it in the beginning, but get lazy and keep it in it's regular area after a couple of weeks. Direct view takes care of the glare, but it is big, bulky, and too small. And the final problem, I do think the plasma would be too high.
    Final solution? Read some books instead. [​IMG]
     
  3. Abdul Jalib

    Abdul Jalib Stunt Coordinator

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    Use a front projector with a screen that comes down from the ceiling in front of the gas fireplace. Otherwise, I'd put a direct view set like a RCA 38310 along the left wall and forget about the speakers. Buy yourself a set of 5 nOrh 4.0's and between their artistry and sound you'll never miss those built-in speakers.
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  4. Pete B.

    Pete B. Stunt Coordinator

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    Ignore the inwall speakers & caddy-corner a 57" RPTV in the top left corner. This way you'll also have a good view from your kitchen counter. Your willing to spend the bucks so get a 5.1 speaker setup and when you eventually get your home theater room you can get a FPTV and relocate the surround package.
    Pete
     
  5. Doug_B

    Doug_B Screenwriter

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    I'm generally with Abdul here. A screen that's ceiling mounted would work, but if not, think about the left wall. You really have to ask about whether the in-wall/ceiling speakers are that important such that you're basing all HT configuration decisions on them. Are these speakers any good, or is it just a WAF issue? You can get away with inexpensive but good sound based on the left wall, and you would need light control for the sliding doors no matter what video option you choose, so you can consider any of the video options you mentioned.
    Good luck.
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    "Today is a good day to die." ...Old Lodge Skins
     
  6. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    My opinion, based on the things you've mentioned; projector, with the screen mounted in the ceiling in front of the fireplace. If you want convenience, a motorized screen. Then you'd ceiling mount the projector - if you really want high WAF and have the money, get a recessed motorized mount for the projector too and have it retract into the ceiling... but even a standard neatly done mounting of a projector in the ceiling would be quite neat.
    You will need light control for the glass doors, but surely some blackout curtains for those should be possible, perhaps augmented by thick hanging drapes in front of them to keep sound reflections off the glass to a minimum.
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    /Kimmo
     
  7. Jean Weitzmann

    Jean Weitzmann Stunt Coordinator

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    Yep, if you can control the light from those glass doors, I agree with the ceiling mount retractable screen above the fireplace.
    You can have the screen housing mounted on the ceiling, or even recessed. Even if the ceiling is high, you can order a screen with a longer top masking.
    I have a Stewart Luxus A ElectriScreen: picture size 84"x47" (96" diagonal, 1.79 AR). The screen housing is a 100" wide box of only 5.25" x 5.50" section. When the screen comes down, it's 94" wide at the largest, and the top of the picture can drop down to 36" below the housing.
    The projector can be ceiling mounted too, out of cat's reach!
    The new DLP projectors from DWIN (or Yamaha) are fairly quiet, but you can always add a "hush-box".
    The only silent CRT projector is also from DWIN (that's what I have), and it is also not too big and heavy compared to other CRT projectors. (the HD-700 is 9.5" x 22" x 22.5", and 65lbs).
    This kind of setup would provide you a nicer picture than any RPTV, but once again, light control is mandatory.
     

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