Please help me adjust my subwoofer's volume control

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave H, Oct 23, 2002.

  1. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    I have Avia and a sound meter. At what level should I adjust my sub's volume. If I get it to match the right main speaker (as some have recommended), then the sub volume is too low for the other speakers. The volume level on my (Yamaha 10") sub is at about 1 (out of 10). Should I just focus getting it at the same level as the right main speaker?
     
  2. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Due to in-accuracies of the Radio Shack meter with low frequency tones, you will find that many have adjusted 4-5dB hot (79-80dB). With all of my other speakers at 75dB, my sub is at 79dB.
     
  3. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    Neil,

    You don't find that is varies from speaker to speaker when you try to set the sub?
     
  4. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Can you clarify that question Dave? Do you mean each type of sub varies of do you mean each speaker in the system?
     
  5. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    When using Avia, you can listen to the sub and each of the main speakers and center channel.

    If I get the sub to match (in terms of volume) the same right speaker, it is less of a difference with the center and left speaker. In other words, the volume of my sub is higher with the right speaker than the other speakers. Which speaker should I used to get a good balance?
     
  6. Geno

    Geno Supporting Actor

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    huh? are your 5 speakers balanced? if so then you have cancelation issues, try moving the direction of the sub. if your 5 speakers are not calibrated, then calibrate those first before going to the sub.
     
  7. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    Okay.....let me explain this more cleary.

    My left, center, right speaker are all at 75 DB. Thus, all are exactly at the same volume.

    However, I find it impossible to get my sub to be at the same volume for each speaker.

    The sub's volume IS HIGHER on the right speaker (than the others) when I select the "phase" right speaker/subwoofer section on Avia.
     
  8. JohnDG

    JohnDG Stunt Coordinator

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    Yep. This happened with myself also. My 16-46PCi was in the front left corner (only spot).

    Remember that the Avia sub test tones use the receiver's crossover, so it is a combination of the main speaker and the sub in generating the overall sound level. Altering the Phase between 0 and 180 would increase the left sound and decrease the right channel.

    Happily in my setup, this was actually an asset. I have a odd-shaped room with no room to move the mains around. As a result the RF speaker was corner loaded -- increasing bass output from 120-80 Hz. By jockeying the phase setting I was able to flatten-out the frequency response curve of the right channel somewhat -- evening out the two sides. I also found that -- by setting the receiver's crossover to 100 instead of (my) normal 80 -- that I was able to additionally curb the peaks of the mains.

    Best bet is to average the settings of the left and right mains -- trying both phase settings -- to try and get the flattest FR curve with your particular setup. When you have a choice, pick a null over a peak. I recently read a statement that I immediately released was true in my situation: "It is easier to hear a peak than it is to hear a null."

    jdg
     
  9. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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  10. JohnDG

    JohnDG Stunt Coordinator

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    A peak or null is a variation higher or lower, respectively, from a flat level dB output when running frequency response test tones (somebody please expand if I butchered this).

    In my room, I get a peak at 100 - 80 Hz (probably due to corner loaded front speakers), another peak at ~40Hz and a null at ~50Hz. The latter two are probably due to my room dimensions (height, width, length). Thus the "+/- 4dB" reference in my testing results. These are variations from the target output dB level.

    Do a search on "frequency response curve" or "FR" in this forum and you'll get lots of references, examples, and more detailed explanations than I can supply.

    jdg
     
  11. RichardH

    RichardH Supporting Actor

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    Just to throw something in, if you're calibrating w/ Avia, you want the meter to read 85 dB when the volume is at 00 .

    Avia's tones are recorded at -20 dBFS, whereas Video Essentials and others are at -30 dBFS.

    As long as you have a relative balance between the speakers/sub, it doesn't really matter. Just wanted to clarify.
     

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