PLASMA SETS...limited life span?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dick, Oct 27, 2002.

  1. Dick

    Dick Producer
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    Is the buzz true, that plasma sets actually have a limited life span - of about three years? If so, why would that be, and are the manufacturers trying to correct this? Who in hell wants to spend $8-12K on something that won't outlive the pet hamster?
     
  2. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    i also recently heard this rumor....anyone have info?
     
  3. Jason Caudill

    Jason Caudill Stunt Coordinator

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    Yes they do have a limited life span. I do not know the technical sid eof this but it is my understanding that most current sets have a life of about 30,000 hrs. But I have also heard from manufacture reps that over 5 years, 10% pixel loss is "acceptable." I would wait on this technology as long as possible because they will be dropping in price very quickly over the next couple of years. I think Sony is only making tube tv's for 2 more years and then going to plasma and lcd exclusively. The big problem is that there are only 4 manufactures of plasma displays right now (Pioneer, Panasonic, NEC, and Fujitsu... I think). Hope this helps, Jason
     
  4. Trevor H

    Trevor H Second Unit

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    LG (Zenith) also makes them, including a very impressive 60"
     
  5. Bobby T

    Bobby T Supporting Actor

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    Sony and Runco also make Plasma TVs.
     
  6. Dave_P.

    Dave_P. Supporting Actor

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    Good god, if I spent $12000 for a TV, I'd want the thing to have a lifetime warranty!
     
  7. Duvall

    Duvall Agent

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    My Rear-Projection TV is the last I'll buy till technology further develops with products that don't have a problem with burn-in. DLP has a ways to go with performance and price, but down the road a bit I have high hopes.

    I spent $3,500 on my 65" Mits two years ago, and fear burn-in regularly. Felt that was a good price gamble on a "bridge" type product till things shake out. I'll be damned if I'd spend the big bucks on a Plasma, as I understand they have burn-in problems with stationary images as well.
     
  8. JohnnyG

    JohnnyG Screenwriter

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    I've heard 7 years with average use. If I understand correctly, the issue is that they use a very thin phosphor coating which fades in time. It's not like the picture is going to vanish in 7 years though - it'll just become gradually more 'washed out' looking (which is probably worse!).
     
  9. Tomoko Noguchi

    Tomoko Noguchi Second Unit

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    Let's see 30,000 hours. I would have to watch that tv for 1250 24 hour days. In other words, I would have to be watching that thing for 24 hours a day for 1250 days. Another way to look at this is 30,000 hours divided by 3 (my average per day watching hours) is 10,000 days. Does anyone do that? I think not. I watch mine about 3 hours a day average and that gives me about 27 years of watching time. If there is no one here who expects to change their equipment in 27 years, please raise your hands.

    Plasma is the way to go right now. Burn in is not a big issue. I have had mine for 1 year and have not had any real burn in problems. I did have a small one one time, but over a day of normal watching the burn in problem went away (faded completely). The people here saying wait may have a point about price. But as to technology there is no reason to really wait. You people who say wait will be waiting until the day you die because there will be nothing good enough right now (it will always be "just around the corner").
     
  10. Jason Caudill

    Jason Caudill Stunt Coordinator

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    Those of you who mentioned LG, Sony, and Runco are you sure they actually make the entire set? They may do some of their own work but I don't think they make the actual plasma part of it. I could be wrong but I have seen aerial photos of the manufacturing facilities and their are like 4 buildings of which Pioneer's is the largest. If I am wrong I would like to know. Thanks, Jason
     
  11. JeremySt

    JeremySt Screenwriter

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  12. David Cohen

    David Cohen Agent

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    Two things..............first, all products that rely on causing phosphours to glow (CRT, Plasma) will fade over time. The life of a plasma, short of circuitry failure, should be similar to CRT based products.

    Second, Samsung builds their own plasma panels and the guts as well. Hitachi also biulds their own set, guts and all, in their new factory opened as a joint vnture with Fujitsu.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  13. Claire Panke

    Claire Panke Second Unit

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    Only a few companies manufacture their own glass panels (around 6-7), plasma panels are highly complex and very difficult to produce, and require an enormous captal investment. But several more companies take NEC or Panasonic glass and rather than merely rebadge them, supply their own elctronics. Fujitsu does this, and have arguably the best plasma displays in the industry. I think something like 16-18 companies offer plasmas now, many are jumping on the bandwagon.

    Since so many plasmas are used for commercial purposes, "monitor" models still prevail - most plasmas aren't integreated "sets" with tuners and amplified speakers. Pioneer and many others are now offering plasmas with media boxes and speakers. With Panasonic, the speakers are optional. Coming from high end audio, this doesn't bother me at all, I'm used to separates and wouldn't want to use their speakers anyway.

    The lifetime I've heard quoted for plasma displays (I thought) was 50% brightness at 30,000 hours (not pixel failure). CRTs fade over time too. I think I figured that with my average usage, I'd be looking at 16 years of display life. Moreover, you can get a great looking Panasonic 42" ED plasma for around $3800 delivered from on-line sources. That's not peanuts but it ain't hardly the kids' college fund.

    2 or 3 years ago, plasmas didn't look nearly as good as they do now, cost much more, and from reports, weren't as stable or reliable. Many current plasma displays look very good indeed.

    If you're curious, the plasma forum and Plasma FAQ over at avsforum.com has a wealth of plasma info.
     
  14. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    The store where I work has had a Pioneer 50" plasma on display for nearly two years. The same TV has been on 10-12 hours a day, 363 days a year, and it still looks incredible. By my math we've got nearly 9000 hours out of this set already and it's still going strong. It looks as good as the new Panasonic 42" that's sitting next to it. I think that 7-year life expectancy estimate is very low.
     
  15. EricHaas

    EricHaas Supporting Actor

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    Samsung makes its own glass and electronics.
    Pioneer makes its own glass and electronics.
    Panasonic makes its own glass and electronics.
    NEC makes its own glass and electronics.
    Sampo makes its own glass and electronics.
    Acer/Benq may or may not make its own glass.
    Fujitsu makes its own glass (with Hitachi) and electronics, but only for its 42" models. It uses Panasonic glass for its 50" models and NEC glass for its 61" model, but uses its own electronic for both.
    Hitachi uses the Fujitsu/Hitachi glass for the 42" panels, but its 50" model is a straight rebadge of the Pioneer 503cmx.
    Sony used Fujitsu/Hitachi glass for its earlier generations and now uses NEC glass. It uses its own electronics.
    All other manufacturers (and there are about 25 others), are rebadges of the above-referenced brands, although a few will add something significant like a scaler.
    On the issue of lifespan:
    http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/show...threadid=130747
     

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