Pioneer VSX-D810S vs. Yamaha RX-V730

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by DougPeter, Apr 30, 2002.

  1. DougPeter

    DougPeter Auditioning

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    Ok I finally thought I had picked the model receiver to buy, a Yamaha RX-V730 which gives me S-video switching, A&B Speakers, nice featured remote, and since I don't know anything about all the decoding, I figured I was safe with what it's spec are, seems to have the right decoding and features. Price is reg 1000 for 800.

    Now I can get a Pioneer for half price of the Yamaha, Pioneer model VSX-D810S Reg 799 for 400. The display appears better ( bigger) on the Yamaha, better remote on Yamaha, 1 more S-video input on Yamaha. Both are brand new in sealed box.

    Now I assume the Yamaha is slightly better, but if I drop to the Pioneer what features am I missing?

    I have JBL CS135 speakers. I am not big in audio, but want to make the right choice, is the Pioneer missing soemthing? seems like a good bargain

    What do you think? The yamaha is nice but really worth the extra cash?

    thanks for any input
     
  2. JesseR

    JesseR Stunt Coordinator

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    pioneers tend to not put out near the amount of watts the say. I have the 710s and am currently looking to get rid of it and upgrade to either a yamaha or denon or integra. Pioneers tend to have problems with distortion. It has played pretty well for the last few months. I woild go with the yamaha....they last longer
     
  3. DougPeter

    DougPeter Auditioning

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    Thanks, what does everyone else say about the Pioneer, is the Yamaha really that much better?
     
  4. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Since you're not that big into audio, why do you consider such an expensive receiver? Lower priced ones will have everything you need if you aren't heavy into this stuff.

    Yamaha makes a more robust unit than Pioneer and the reputation and quality of yamaha producs over several decades have prooven their reliability.

    I would go with the yamaha too but since you aren't as into this stuff as most of us here, you may be better off just going with the cheaper pioneer.
     
  5. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    i agree, don't spend so much on a receiver for those speakers. i also have the scs135si and i bought the yamaha htr-5440 (aka: rxv-420) and it works fine. I'd recommend the htr-5540/rxv-430 for you. It doesn't have s-video switching, a/b speaker switching, or discrete 6.1, but do you really need these features?

    I generally don't like the build quality of non elite pioneers, way too much plastic.
     
  6. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    I've used non-Elite Pioneer receivers and they work just fine. In fact, I still have a stereo model dating back from 1990-91 in service in my home office - so they are just as reliable as any other budget receiver in my opinion. Judging from the problems the Marantz x200 and Onkyo 797 have had, even companies with better reputations suffer from quality control problems and bugs/glitches. Assuming both models have the feature set you're looking for, then it boils down to a question of money vs. quality. As for quality, this can be subjective but one can guess from the cheaper price that Pioneer is using lower cost components, cheaper amps, etc. than other companies in the same product class. Their specs usually indicate a higher THD number and don't always list this number for the full frequency range (20hz-20Khz). Whether this affects things probably depends on the quality of the equipment you have hooked up to it and the quality of your ears. If you can, take a listen to both with the same set of equipment similar to your own and see if you hear any differences.

    I'm actually considering the Pioneer D811S to replace another older Pioneer in a budget home theater setup. See my thread from this week on 6.1 budget receivers. Besides Yamaha, Onkyo, Denon and Marantz may also be brands to consider in your price range.

    good luck,

    --tom
     
  7. Harold_C

    Harold_C Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a Pioneer 810. Frankly, for the $300-something I paid for it, I think it's a very impressive piece of gear. I say that from the perspective of someone who has never been a fan of Pioneer receivers. But, it works as advertised and has sufficient control options to configure a very good surround system.

    The DSP modes are a freakshow, but what do you expect? You can tame them down enough to be useful for a really crappy TV soundtrack.

    The amplifier section is saddled with the same current limiting and general lack of punch as any other 80 watt per channel inexpensive Japanese receiver, but it sounds "pleasant" enough, albeit a bit mellow and lifeless when pushed. I really don't expect any other $400 receiver to be any better in that regard.

    I don't honestly think there's a dime's worth of difference in any of the $300 to $400 receivers. Used within reason in an ALL SMALL speaker system with a capable powered sub and these products offer very high value. Choose one with preamp outputs and buy a separate multi-channel amp and you've got a bargain in a "pre-pro" unit.
     
  8. DougPeter

    DougPeter Auditioning

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    Thanks for the input everyone

    S-video switching is important to me, as well as A&B speakers. I want a user friendly system that the wife and kids can use, as well being able to play music on the B speakers in the dining room. These are features not found on the 430 and 530 lineup (5540 5550. This is a tough decision, I have the 730 here and hooked up, but can return it and use the cash for some other toy if I go with the Pioneer.

    However what ever I get I will be keeping for a long time, I can't afford to be replacing in 5 years.

    So I am trying to buy something current which will last for a while.

    Harold, what do you mean the DSP modes are a freak show? Is the Yamaha that much better?

    Jason, you have the Yamaha without the S-video and A&B switching, but Yamaha has changed the line up this year and you have to move up to the 5560 or 630 and 730 to get these features. Do you feel you have too much amp for your speakers?

    Sounds like the Yamaha will be a safer bet for the long haul, but the Pioneer may be a good cheap solution.

    Thanks everyone keep the comment coming! This forum is great!!!
     
  9. DonJ

    DonJ Second Unit

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    SEE this linkwww.hifichoice.co.uk/review_read.asp?ID=1883 The Pioneer gets an awful review. I have a friend who a has one he kept on saying how his VSX-810 was more powerful and sounded better than my H/K 320. The funny thing is he had never heard my reciever till he brought it over to do a side by side comparison. He never said that again.[​IMG]
     
  10. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Since you already have the 730 you should just keep it. I'm sure you will love it so much anyway that you won't be able to let it go. You can always upgrade your speakers in the future and become an Audio/Video nut just like the rest of us here![​IMG]
     
  11. Harold_C

    Harold_C Stunt Coordinator

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    When you read the British hi-fi mags, you have to put things in context. Of course they don't like the sound of the amplifiers in a cheap surround sound receiver. Who would?

    For context, read their review of the more expensive Onkyo surround receiver:

     
  12. Mike Veroukis

    Mike Veroukis Second Unit

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    To save some cash you may want to consider the RX-V630.

    I would argue that over all the Yamaha unit would be better then the Pioneer. If you're gonna splurge you might as well do it on your amp as it's the center of your audio domain. The Yammies support many formats including 6.1 processing. They are very good bang for your buck and are built to last. I say keep the 730 and be proud of it, it's a good unit and will provide you with years of enjoyment.

    - Mike
     
  13. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

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    Does anyone know what the difference is between the Yamaha HTR line and the RX-V line? Are they two names for the same line or two completely different beasts?

    cheers,

    --tom
     
  14. DonJ

    DonJ Second Unit

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    Harold_C
    Touché, Yes the Brits can be brutally honest but that’s just apart of there humor and why I like reading there rags. They don’t sugar coat anything they just tell it like it is. But to counter what you said this is what they had to say about NAD T761
    The T761 is equally ahead of most comers - no, all comers according to the test panel. To a man, they were in no doubt that this was the best sounding model of the day.
    And the H/K 5000
    The AVR5000 is not quite the best in group sonically, but it comes close, producing music that is "interesting, and holds together well'. There was criticism of the bass, which was felt to be weak dynamically, and some criticism overall of a design that the panel felt sounded "safe and controlled" rather than vivid and exciting. But with an amplifier as complex as this one, it is a minor miracle that the audio signal finds its way past the output terminals at all...
    But this is a good receiver. In extended hands-on testing, the AVR5000 impressed with its easy, powerful delivery, and it gave
    excellent spatial positioning with
    CD and DVD-Audio material, and also with data-reduced Dolby Digital and dts where the Harman/Kardon is operating in a more hands-on mode. The only real criticism concerns the constrained top end which lacks air and space, and this has the effect of suppressing ambience. The bass
    wasn't a problem out of the panel test context, which appeared to be dominated by the Sonus Faber Home's bass quality, which can be a tad soft unless firmly directed otherwise by the amplifier.
    So its not all bad [​IMG]
     
  15. DonJ

    DonJ Second Unit

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    But my point is don't buy something that you are going to regret later. As we all know buyers remorse sucks. Save a little longer spend a little more and once the newness of the product you bought wheres off still be happy with your purchase.[​IMG]
     
  16. Mike Veroukis

    Mike Veroukis Second Unit

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    Thomas:

    Thee is much debate as to the differences between the RX-V and HT lines. However, according to the Yamaha site (look up their FAQ) it clearly states that the two lines are parallel. The only difference is that the HTR line has a slightly different front panel. The two are otherwise made in the same factory with same internals and even priced the same. The reason for this is that the HTR line is targetted at discount retailers while the RX-V line is for the hi-fi stores.

    So far only one model in the RX-V line does not perfectly match it's HTR equivalent and that's the RX-V1200. The HTR equivalent (htr-5590???) lacks a few minor features but is otherwise the same. Also, there are no HTR equivalents for RX-V models above the 1200 (ie. 2200, 3200 and Z1).

    You can count on the same Yamaha SQ & QC for both lines.

    - Mike
     
  17. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    Since you need the a/b switching and s-video, go with the 630, or keep the 730 if you really like the remote. I plan to buy the 630 when i head off for college because of its all channel preouts. Also, My 65wpc 420 can handle the scs135si pretty well considering that they are rated at 86db sensitivity.
     
  18. MatthewJ S

    MatthewJ S Supporting Actor

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    there is no equivalent to the rxv730 in the htr line-up, the rxv1200 has a few upgrades from it's closest equivalent and can be had for the same price ,nothing above the 1200 in the htr line and the sub $500 dollar pieces cost the same from a smaller retailer as the equivalents do from bb....
     
  19. Harold_C

    Harold_C Stunt Coordinator

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  20. DougPeter

    DougPeter Auditioning

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    So I take it, for the price the Pioneer is a good buy in that price range, which is basically a full featured bottom of the line unit.

    Does the Yamaha move up a level, is it kind of moving more to the middle of the road better unit?

    I am starting to feel that the Yamaha is the safer buy as it will probably perform better, last longer and have more features. But is all of this worth doubling the price from 400 to 800 Canadian dollars?

    thanks
     

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