What's new

JoshZ

Supporting Actor
Joined
May 26, 2012
Messages
820
Location
Boston
Real Name
Joshua Zyber
Back in the day, I used to shop at Laser Blaser in West Los Angeles and spend a big chunk of my lunch hour there about twice a month. They had a huge selection of titles, and the staff was very nice and helpful. The advent of DVD pretty much finished them off, since even supermarkets were carrying them for sale, and I miss that personal service and being able flip through the rows and rows of laserdiscs. Definitely now a relic from the past.

I had similar experience at a shop called Laser Craze in Boston. It was around the corner from Tower Records, which also had a pretty good LD selection, including imports.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PMF

David Deeb

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Messages
1,120
Real Name
David
The thing with Borders is that if you paid for a membership, they'd send you frequent coupons that made shopping there more worthwhile. If you were a heavy purchaser, the coupon discounts eventually paid for the price of the membership. Without that, however, their MSRP prices were way out of line with what you could pay elsewhere.

The old "pay us to save" concept. I never have thought this was an effective marketing tool. FYE did this as well.

You'd spend $25 in order to save 10%. After spending $250 on MSRP items, you would finally break even, and then start saving. Most people would never spend that much and the retailer would actually make more on those people.
 
  • Insightful
Reactions: PMF

David Deeb

Screenwriter
Joined
Nov 17, 2005
Messages
1,120
Real Name
David
Costco/BJs/Sam's Club and other membership retailers seem to have made it work. :)

Yes, but there are several differences.

Primarily, Costco and Sam's require a membership to shop there to begin with. Then you are buying in bulk most of the time, and items are typically priced lower for the benefit of buying in bulk (or that is what the concept promotes itself as). Many items are exclusive to these stores, and most everything in the store is at a good price. People that don't have a membership aren't allowed to come and shop.

Border's and FYE were open for business to everyone. Anyone could walk in and browse. They would push these memberships, and spending a little more right then, at the cash register. Most of their DVDs and CDs were at MSRP. So even when you bought the membership, you could still wind up paying more than what you find it priced at elsewhere.
 

JoshZ

Supporting Actor
Joined
May 26, 2012
Messages
820
Location
Boston
Real Name
Joshua Zyber
Yes, but there are several differences.

Primarily, Costco and Sam's require a membership to shop there to begin with. Then you are buying in bulk most of the time, and items are typically priced lower for the benefit of buying in bulk (or that is what the concept promotes itself as). Many items are exclusive to these stores, and most everything in the store is at a good price. People that don't have a membership aren't allowed to come and shop.

Border's and FYE were open for business to everyone. Anyone could walk in and browse. They would push these memberships, and spending a little more right then, at the cash register. Most of their DVDs and CDs were at MSRP. So even when you bought the membership, you could still wind up paying more than what you find it priced at elsewhere.

Yeah, I understand and agree. Was just pointing out that the "pay us to save" concept isn't dead. It just evolved.

I'm as guilty as anyone of browsing the shelves at Borders and then placing an order on Amazon for something that interested me. Even among brick & mortar stores, I could often find CDs and DVDs cheaper by going to the Strawberries down the block, and Strawberries' prices weren't so hot either.
 

Jasper70

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Mar 24, 2017
Messages
226
Real Name
Harold
As far as VHS tapes go, there are thousands of movies, concerts, documentaries and other genres that haven’t been released on DVD or Blu-ray. While volume has dropped I still sell quite a few VHS tapes per month.
And around here you can get a VCR at Goodwill for $5 to $10 bucks.

I have in my collection several concerts on VHS and Laserdisc unavailable on other formats. I’d love to have them on DVD or Blu-ray but unfortunately they haven’t and probably never will be released.

And don’t forget, there are buyers of media that haven’t upgraded to a digital format. They’re completely happy with a VHS tape of their favorite movies.
 

mark27b

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
May 26, 2012
Messages
239
Real Name
Mark Pledger

jcroy

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2011
Messages
6,811
Real Name
jr
Not too surprising really. Stuff that the hardcore crowd already knows (or suspected).

That article reads like it was written for an audience who doesn't follow dvd/bluray/4Kbluray type stuff that closely.
 

Guardyan

Agent
Joined
Mar 3, 2021
Messages
41
Real Name
Mattie
As far as VHS tapes go, there are thousands of movies, concerts, documentaries and other genres that haven’t been released on DVD or Blu-ray. While volume has dropped I still sell quite a few VHS tapes per month.
And around here you can get a VCR at Goodwill for $5 to $10 bucks.

I have in my collection several concerts on VHS and Laserdisc unavailable on other formats. I’d love to have them on DVD or Blu-ray but unfortunately they haven’t and probably never will be released.

And don’t forget, there are buyers of media that haven’t upgraded to a digital format. They’re completely happy with a VHS tape of their favorite movies.
Yup! So crazy how so many titles got a VHS release but never saw the day when it came to DVD and other digital formats. Unfortunately some titles will just disappear.

Im curious though: what type of VHS tapes you sell? Form your collection or are you talking about blank tapes?

Owners of certain televisions from the likes of Samsung and LG and Roku devices will from 15th June have to watch their Google-purchases movies through YouTube instead.

Just like I've said earlier, news like that makes me think that optical discs are still the way to go about owning media.
 

cineMANIAC

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2008
Messages
2,150
Location
New York City
Real Name
Luis
This thread is now 3 years old - I imagine the "depletion" of physical media in brick & mortars is now at a point so low it's not even worth going to a store to see what they may have. I hadn't been to a Best Buy in years so I decided to stop into one recently. The physical media footprint had been greatly reduced to a small area but they still had enough product for me to spend at least 10 minutes browsing - or so I thought. Upon closer inspection, the shelves were mostly occupied by something that looked like movies but were just cards for streaming purchases. The actual product were a couple copies of popular titles here and there, some boutique label titles and expensive box sets of TV shows and big movies. There was a large area that had been cordoned off and there were empty shelves - I guess that store had a major product cutback in progress. It's sad but not unexpected. I do miss the store experience but I get my kicks now from the mailman, Amazon couriers and, occasionally, UPS. They bring me movies on an almost daily basis and that, my friends, is a LOT easier - and healthier - than schlepping to a store with little to no product. I lost count the number of times I walked away from a brick & mortar empty-handed even before physical media started to decline. Early 2000's I used to make weekly pilgrimages to a local shop that had great selection and always went home with an armload of movies. That hasn't happened since about the time I joined this forum.

Oh, and BTW, physical media is NOT dead. My shopping list is a mile long. Taking into account the number of titles I've purchased over the last 3 years alone, I'd say PM is alive and well.
 
Last edited:

Robert Crawford

Crawdaddy
Moderator
Patron
Joined
Dec 9, 1998
Messages
52,935
Location
Michigan
Real Name
Robert
Well, no, but taking into account online purchases, it's alive and well in that context. If people are saying physical media is dead based on their experiences shopping at B&Ms, yes, it's dead 😉
IMO, even with online purchases, I think the total sales today are nowhere near what physical media was back about 10-15 years ago. The lack of impulse purchases is a main factor in those reduced units sold.
 

jcroy

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2011
Messages
6,811
Real Name
jr
This thread is now 3 years old - I imagine the "depletion" of physical media in brick & mortars is now at a point so low it's not even worth going to a store to see what they may have.

The only nearby offline places I still check for dvd/bluray, is wallyworld.

Otherwise most of the other places I use to regularly check the dvd/bluray sections, have either closed down or they eliminated the dvd/bluray section entirely (such as discount stores, grocery stores, etc ...).
 

Josh Steinberg

Premium
Reviewer
Joined
Jun 10, 2003
Messages
20,807
Real Name
Josh Steinberg
IMO, even with online purchases, I think the total sales today are nowhere near what physical media was back about 10-15 years ago.

The sales numbers bear that out - at its height, physical media sales grossed about $20 billion a year about 10–15 years ago, and that was down to about $2 billion last year.
 

Dave H

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 13, 2000
Messages
5,837
Oh, and BTW, physical media is NOT dead. My shopping list is a mile long. Taking into account the number of titles I've purchased over the last 3 years alone, I'd say PM is alive and well.

Agreed. LD existed for at least a couple of decades as a far smaller niche I imagine. I think UHD BD especially in today's video enthusiast times with better projectors, OLEDs, higher contrast LEDs, HDR, etc. can go for quite a while longer. That might mean price increases as perhaps more boutiques get into it much like has happened with standard Blu-ray (Shout, Arrow, Kino, etc.). Of course, some of these have already dipped their toe into the UHD BD waters.
 

Suzanne.S

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Jul 23, 2002
Messages
233
Location
St. Louis, MO
Real Name
Suzanne
I was at Best Buy a few weeks ago to look at cameras. I have not been shopping in over a year, so it was a real shock to me. There were hardly any movies at all. There were hardly any cameras either. In fact, the whole store seemed under stocked. This was the extent of the movies. This store used to have six to eight very long aisles with movies.

Even before the pandemic, I bought most of my movies online because I tend to like classics and more obscure films that never were carried really widely at the local stores, but occasionally it was fun to browse and maybe find something that I hadn't heard of or a new release that my husband would like. I miss the browsing. :huh:
 

Attachments

  • 20210405_165340.jpg
    20210405_165340.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 21
  • 20210405_165344.jpg
    20210405_165344.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 23
  • 20210405_165442.jpg
    20210405_165442.jpg
    2.3 MB · Views: 23

Users who are viewing this thread

Forum Sponsors

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
347,192
Messages
4,805,250
Members
142,024
Latest member
Fred1976
Top