1. Sign-up to become a member, and most of the ads you see will disappear. It only takes 30 seconds to sign up, so join the discussion today!
    Dismiss Notice

Physical Media might not be dead, but Physical Media in Retail Stores are accelerating the death

Discussion in 'TV on DVD and Blu-ray' started by mrz7, Mar 4, 2018.

Tags:
  1. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,319
    Likes Received:
    7,677
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    In 1956 Chrysler offered one as an option:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    1960 Dodge Polara with RCA record player:
    [​IMG]

    A 1960s era slot loading car record player - aftermarket. Plays 45s.
    [​IMG]

    Chrysler even tried a trunk mounted changer in the early 60s.

    And Peter beat me to posting that Laurel and Hardy bit...
     
  2. TJPC

    TJPC Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2016
    Messages:
    3,601
    Likes Received:
    3,131
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Hamilton Ontario
    Real Name:
    Terry Carroll
    I read about these. Weren’t the tone arms so heavy that they were very hard on the records.
     
  3. David_B_K

    David_B_K Advanced Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Messages:
    2,037
    Likes Received:
    507
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    Real Name:
    David
    My truck is even older than that. I put an aftermarket Kenwood stereo in it so I could pick up the local classical channel which now only broadcasts in digital HD. The Kenwood plays CDs but I far prefer using thumbdrives. Mine will take two thumb drives. The "rear" one is actually in my glove box. That one has all of Sinatra's output from Capitol on it. I use the "front" one to change out thumb drives with other stuff. My radio has up/down buttons with which I select the album (folder) I want. Because the Sinatra drive is always loaded, I am very familiar with the order of all the albums (I numbered them when ripping the albums onto the drive) and I can easily access any Sinatra song on that drive. I also have one with all the Beatles albums and singles. I carry extra thumb drives with classical and other artists. I much prefer this method to changing out CDs.
     
    Suzanne.S likes this.
  4. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    8,829
    Likes Received:
    2,475
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Salinas, CA
    Real Name:
    Matthew
    That must be partly why they invented cassette tapes and 8-tracks in the first place: they were easier to play in cars.
     
  5. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,319
    Likes Received:
    7,677
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    The "8 Track" player began life in 1953 as a broadcast system to easily play commercials. It was called "Fidelipak":

    [​IMG]

    The hole in the bottom left is where the pinch roller flips up from the player and presses the tape against a capstan to pull it across the heads. The tape pulls from the inside and winds back on the outside during its travels. Those were "single track" stereo or mono and came in several lengths for different commercial/spot lengths.

    In 1962 a guy named Earl "Madman" Muntz adapted that system for a car player. It was 4 track stereo and used the same transport as the Fidelipak carts. He sold the units mostly in California and Florida.

    The Stereo 8 Track cartridge system was developed by the Lear Jet corporation in 1963. They moved the pinch roller inside the cartridge, reducing player cost and complexity, removed some tensioning and other items, narrowed the recording/playback track so there'd be 8 tracks and thus doubled the recording time from 40 to 80 minutes.

    [​IMG]

    In 1965 Ford began offering 8 Track players as a built-in option.

    Muntz tried to keep his 4 track system going but by 1970 saw the writing on the wall and abandoned it.

    Phillips introduced the compact cassette in 1962, mainly as a playback device for dictation machines. Improvements in fidelity and the introduction of Dolby audio and chromium tape by Ampex in 1971, coupled with their Model 201 home deck was the tipping point and the format began to be used by more home recordists and in cars.

    I installed my first cassette deck in my car that same year and never looked back - all my friends had 8-track. I had fewer issues and far more flexibility (I made my own tapes for the car - I never purchased pre-recorded tapes as I could make better sounding ones myself). It was a Craig auto-reverse deck with a "quick mount" so I could remove it when I parked the car. The deck ran through a Craig "Powerplay Power Booster" (25watt output). One of the speaker pairs was 8" Jenson's mounted in the back deck. It was loud...
     
    Brent Reid and Malcolm R like this.
  6. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2001
    Messages:
    52,467
    Likes Received:
    14,859
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Rensselaer, NY
    If I only had a nickel for every set of pads I replaced on various carts across my early radio career...

    :laugh:
     
    BobO'Link and bmasters9 like this.
  7. John*Wells

    John*Wells Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2005
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    906
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John
    Isn't what we watch on Streaming services actually just the Services using the DVD or Blu Ray and thereby charging us for the convenience of not having to get up and walk over the our players and Put in whatever we want to watch?
     
  8. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 1999
    Messages:
    4,137
    Likes Received:
    2,121
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Peter Apruzzese
    No, they don't use DVD/Blu-ray for streaming.
     
    The Drifter likes this.
  9. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Messages:
    5,197
    Likes Received:
    1,975
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    jr
    Functionally in a figurative sense, more or less yes.

    In a literal sense, no.

    True in the literal sense.
     
  10. The Drifter

    The Drifter Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2019
    Messages:
    774
    Likes Received:
    601
    Trophy Points:
    610
    Real Name:
    Jim
    Correct. This is especially true for brand-new TV shows that haven't even hit DVD/Blu yet - and may never be put on physical media.
     
  11. MatthewA

    MatthewA Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2000
    Messages:
    8,829
    Likes Received:
    2,475
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Salinas, CA
    Real Name:
    Matthew
    What do they stream them from if not discs? Hard drives?
     
  12. jcroy

    jcroy Producer

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Messages:
    5,197
    Likes Received:
    1,975
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    jr
    Probably similar to how search engine data is stored. Most likely the streaming data which is constantly being accessed is stored in giant ram memory arrays.

    Storing constantly accessed data on hard drives would shorten the drive's lifetime to less than a week (or days). This was known very well from the early days of internet search engines.
     
  13. TJPC

    TJPC Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2016
    Messages:
    3,601
    Likes Received:
    3,131
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Location:
    Hamilton Ontario
    Real Name:
    Terry Carroll
    I had a huge collection of audio cassettes that I converted to CD. They were never mistreated and always in air conditioning. About 1/3 were unplayable at first and the tape had to be broken out of the plastic cases and put into another screw together case to play. The tape was fine, but all original pads etc. had deteriorated. BASF was especially bad, with the pads being a slimy mess.
     
  14. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,769
    Likes Received:
    4,062
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    Lots and lots of hard drives and lots of lots of flash memory using custom hardware and Amazon Web Services (AWS). Here's some stuff I found with a little searching.

    This article from 2014 is outdated but is probably still correct enough:
    https://www.computerworld.com/article/2489741/how-netflix-streams-movies-to-your-tv.html
    Here's a really technical talk for networking pros, if you want to get super nerdy.



    (I'm not a network engineer, but I have friends who are.)
     
  15. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    22,769
    Likes Received:
    4,062
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Catfisch Cinema
    Real Name:
    Dave
    FWIW: That "good enough" phone screen is higher resolution and higher quality with better contrast than most HDTV were a decade ago. The new OLED phones are probably better contrast and color accuracy, if not true 4K, than most TVs for sale in 2020. And the audio from headphones is probably better than most people get from their TV speakers.
     
    Josh Steinberg likes this.
  16. BobO'Link

    BobO'Link Producer

    Joined:
    May 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,319
    Likes Received:
    7,677
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Mid-South
    Real Name:
    Howie
    And the "apparent" size of that tiny phone screen may actually be larger than the TV in the living room/den.

    Hold your phone at the distance you would normally use it to view a video. Keep the distance from your eyes consistent as you tilt up to align it with your TV. Unless you have a larger than normal TV screen it's likely that phone screen will *look* larger than your TV screen when done that way.

    I'm not much of a fan of watching streaming video on my laptop but the apparent screen size is much larger than that of my TV when this experiment is done. Even my 7" Fire tablet looks larger.
     
    DaveF and bmasters9 like this.
  17. mark27b

    mark27b Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Messages:
    190
    Likes Received:
    78
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Real Name:
    Mark Pledger
  18. bmasters9

    bmasters9 Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    4,135
    Likes Received:
    3,844
    Trophy Points:
    4,110
    Real Name:
    Ben Masters
    One commenter on there had similar views to mine about films as I have to television, in that he says that choice is why he prefers discs, and that his older tastes are not reflected on Netflix that well.
     
  19. John*Wells

    John*Wells Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2005
    Messages:
    1,210
    Likes Received:
    906
    Trophy Points:
    1,610
    Real Name:
    John
    I skimmed the Article. My rationale for Collecting Physical discs remains. what happens if your ISP goes down for an extended period? Or suppose ISP start charging more for streaming usage? With Net Neutrality no longer in place, there is nothing to stop this from happening
     
    mrz7 and Jesse Skeen like this.
  20. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 1998
    Messages:
    46,391
    Likes Received:
    22,261
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    Real Name:
    Robert
    My power has gone out more than my ISP provider. As to the ISP charging more, if that happens then I'll worry about it.
     

Share This Page