jcroy

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The only niche which is "almost dead" for bluray in america, is tv shows which are not genre.

Basically if a show is not on a premium cable channel (ie. HBO, etc ...), not sci-fi/fantasy/superhero/etc ... and is not owned by Warner, then most likely it will never see the light of day on bluray.
 

TJPC

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I used to pour over the Best Buy flyer each week checking for Blu ray and DVD bargains. A couple of months ago the flyer listed only the Tuesday released. At least a month ago and after the only discs they advertise are for games.
 
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bmasters9

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I used to pour over the Best Buy flyer each week checking for Blu ray and DVD bargains. A couple of months ago the flyer listed only the Tuesday released. At least a month ago and after the only discs they advertise are for games.
That's because they're more about equipment and appliances apparently, sad to say!
 

bmasters9

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The former dvd/bluray floor space at the nearby BestBuys, are now filled with cell phones.
I never thought that I'd see the day when cellphones made more money at Best Buy than discs did, but it's here and it's now!
 

jcroy

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I never thought that I'd see the day when cellphones made more money at Best Buy than discs did, but it's here and it's now!
I remember when I was younger, anybody who owned a pager was usually a doctor or a cocaine dealer. (Cell phones were too bulky and expensive in those days).
 
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PMF

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I don't buy phones from BB, but I do dial them in for my BD orders.
 
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Maxman43

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I remember when I was younger, anybody who owned a pager was usually a doctor or a cocaine dealer. (Cell phones were too bulky and expensive in those days).
Yes. And don't forget hookers.
 
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Wvtvguy

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People don’t like to go out to shop period. I love to go to actually leave the house to shop. I like to try on a shirt. I like to flip through a book. I honestly don’t know many who do though. Kind of connects to why people don’t want to own physical copies of anything. Streaming can be done from the home & is faster than ordering so why buy a physical copy? I shop online but it’s mostly to buy things like cds or blu rays. I’m a dinosaur.

The FYE in my local mall used to be enormous!! Huge sections devoted to genres of music & dvds. I could get any type of older albums I wanted and then pick up a season of my favorite show. Now the store is half the size. There are a few greatest hits albums and a tiny section devoted to blu rays. Huge section of phone cases though!
 

jcroy

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People don’t like to go out to shop period. I love to go to actually leave the house to shop. I like to try on a shirt. I like to flip through a book. I honestly don’t know many who do though. Kind of connects to why people don’t want to own physical copies of anything. Streaming can be done from the home & is faster than ordering so why buy a physical copy? I shop online but it’s mostly to buy things like cds or blu rays. I’m a dinosaur.
The primary reason I still buy most books in paper form (mostly from amazon), is that most publishers are complete dolts when it comes to the digital versions of their highly technical books.

Basically the digital versions of too many technical books are lousy scans from an old paper copy. Frequently this creates new "misprints", such as plus + signs which are printed incorrectly as minus - signs, etc ...

Very frustrating.

On the other hand for "junk food" type of books like Star Wars or Star Trek novels, etc ... I'm would be fine with reading the digital versions.
 
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Susan Nunes_329977

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Physical books aren't going anywhere. EBooks don't cut it for me and not for a lot of other people.

As for DVDs, Amazon and eBay are far more responsible for the decline of sales in stores than people just downloading stuff they don't own and which can be removed from the streaming outfit libraries.
Buying online is way more convenient, not to mention the vast variety of titles which are on the online sites.

I still get CDs, mostly through Amazon, if I want a particular album or an artist. I do downloads if I just want a song or two.
 

Malcolm R

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I love physical media, but it's probably indicative of something that this is the first Christmas in probably 20+ years that I didn't ask for or receive any movies/TV or music on physical media.
 
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The Obsolete Man

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CES 2019: THE BEGINNING OF THE END FOR PHYSICAL MEDIA
January 11, 2019 by Bill Hunt - The Digital Bits

http://www.thedigitalbits.com/columns/my-two-cents/011119-1500
*sigh*

Yeah.

With me, it's been a vicious circle, though. I still want to buy stuff. But the companies stop producing a show on disc, so I get it digitally. Then, I'm less likely to buy something else new that comes out when I can get it digitally, since there's no more certainty that a series will be seen through to completion. Or, it'll be overpriced MoD discs, so might as well just get the digital versions.

Sure, I pick up the complete series from the smaller guys when they release classic shows, but new stuff? Don't see the point anymore.
 

TJPC

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This year, I record and edit 4 TV series with my recordable DVD player on DVD-RW discs. Each season, I have replaced these discs with Blu-rays and DVDs and reused the ones I have made. I am still waiting to replace my “Galavant” discs.

I am always afraid that the commercially made ones will not be available. This worked well with “Star Trek Discovery”, “The Walking Dead”, and “The Orville”. This year, for some reason, season 4 of “Fear The Walking Dead” has only thus far been released in Europe.
 
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Vic Pardo

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So far i only have 5 4K titles on my shelf. Would like to see more released soon.
I read that as "So far I only have 5.4k titles on my shelf." 5400 discs?! But no, it's five 4K titles. Need to spell out the number in cases like that.
 
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EricSchulz

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http://thedigitalbits.com/columns/my-two-cents/011119-1500


" Paramount Pictures Home Entertainment barely exits anymore, and after a great start with catalog 4K they seem to be losing interest in the format. Sony Pictures Home Entertainment now exists in name only (though at least they are continuing to release some good catalog titles on 4K). New Line and MGM exist in name only. Having just been purchased by Disney, 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment is soon to be absorbed into the House of Mouse at the cost of a lot of good people likely losing their jobs. We’re down to just one major replicator of physical media discs in all of North America now (down from six at the height of DVD and Blu-ray). Street dates are getting pushed and delayed. Some titles are hard to find on Amazon and local store shelves. When discs do get produced, there are more authoring and mastering errors (and complaining about these rarely does any good anymore). Titles like Disney’s animated The Lion King are getting quietly released on 4K without so much as a press release. Beloved manufacturer OPPO Digital has stopped making players. It’s a very strange time."


Good times:angry:
LOL...you're about four posts too late!
 

Josh Steinberg

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I read Bill Hunt's editorial in its entirety, and I think it makes some good points, but I think it also misses a vital one. The article sort of makes it sound like its some kind of studio driven conspiracy to get people to give up on physical media, and sort of acts like it's a big mystery why studios are producing fewer discs and manufacturers are producing fewer players.

I don't think it's a conspiracy or a mystery.

The general public is losing interest in needing to purchase a physical object in order to enjoy their entertainment choices.

It's that simple. We, those of us that participate on home theater internet forums, who subscribe to websites like the Digital Bits, etc., are a minority of the total entertainment consuming audiences. And while I think our hobby is valid and interesting and worthwhile, the fact is that the average consumer is mostly able to get their needs met without having to purchase a physical object.

M. Night Shyamalan has a new movie coming out next week called "Glass" - it's the sequel to two of his previous films, "Unbreakable" and "Split." Let's say you're like me and you remember the previous two films, have interest in the new film, but want to rewatch the older films before seeing the new one. Ten years ago, you'd have to either physically travel to an actual store to rent or purchase a disc, or order it by mail. If you chose the store route, you'd also have to hope that the store actually carried the title you wanted, and furthermore, that it was in stock. If you rented it, you'd then have to make a second trip to the store to return it. If you bought it, maybe you'd watch it a bunch of times, but just as likely, you'd watch it once and then it would collect dust. Options have changed in ten years. Now, if you want to rewatch the older films, you could still try to go to a store to get a copy, or you could still mail order through a retailer like Amazon. I just checked on Amazon and "Split" is out of stock and not expected to be available again until next week. Or, you could just as easily spend $3.99 and rent the movie digitally and watch it right now, with no returns or worries of it being out of stock or having to leave the house.

It's an evolution in the way that average customers consume media.

And I say all of this as a guy who loves physical media, but I don't know how it survives longterm when physical media is no longer the most convenient or cheapest way for the average consumer to view a title of their choice.
 

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