Photography Tips

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Mark Shannon, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. Mark Shannon

    Mark Shannon Screenwriter

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    Ok, I'm 16, and in Grade 11.

    I applied for the first time this year to be a photographer for the school yearbook. I figured after two years in the school, it's about time that I got involved. Well I have to submit a sample folder of my photography, just to be evaluated.

    I guess what I'm asking is, any tips? The pictures must have good composure, and just exhibit what I can do.

    All of the pictures are to be taken with a digital camera, something which I both like and hate, as I've been wanting to wanting to try out my father's old SLR (brand escapes memory right now)...

    Any comments, advice, tips, personal memories?
     
  2. Seth--L

    Seth--L Screenwriter

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    The simplest way to determine if what you've photographed has any merit is to ask yourself if the photos are the kind that you would see on a postcard or on a hotel wall (though the year book people probably only care if the images are in focus, somewhat properly framed, and not over or underexposed).

    EDIT: Also figure out how you can take the best looking pictures using the manual controls on the digital camera. The auto setting can often be a mixed bag.
     
  3. Mario Bartel

    Mario Bartel Stunt Coordinator

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    Faces, faces, faces. You're shooting for the yearbook, and it will be the faces your classmates will be looking back on years down the road.

    Don't be afraid to get in close. Make sure your subject is the dominant element of the frame. Work from the same level as your subject; if you're photographing someone playing marbles on the ground, shoot them from ground level.

    Look around your viewfinder before you trip the shutter, keep your backgrounds clean and your composition simple.

    Pack your camera with you at all times; you never know when those great moments might happen. The beauty of most digitty cameras is they're so small, you can easily slip them into a pocket.

    Familiarize yourself with the limitations of your camera, and learn how to work within them; don't expect the flash on a little digitty camera to be able to light up a whole gymnasium or the short zoom lens to be able to pull in a play on the opposite side of the football field.

    Most of all, have fun!
     
  4. Mark Shannon

    Mark Shannon Screenwriter

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    Mario, I have been packing my camera with me since I've recieved the news of my acceptance. I've just been taking pictures when the time seems fit. I can't fit mine into my pocket though, I have an Olympus C-730 , one model below the one on the page.

    I've been having quite a bit of fun though.
     
  5. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    For the past 3 years, I have been using an Olympus D460Z, and it's small enough to stick in my pocket, and it has a protective front slide-away cover that acts like the "on/off" switch as well, so no worries when the camera is in my pocket. It's truly a compact camera for people on-the-go. I'd love to have a digital camera with a 10X optical zoom, like the Olympus C-730, but the logistics of carrying such a camera around is what deters me from getting one nowadays.
     
  6. Tom Meyer

    Tom Meyer Second Unit

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    Mark,

    The best advice I can give you is to shoot, shoot and shoot and shoot some more. The more you shoot, the more really great pics you'll get. As any experienced photographer will tell you, you should only really expect to get 1 or 2 *really* good shots on each roll. A National Geographic photog, for example, shoots thousands of frames just to get the 8 or 10 used in any given article. So get shooting !
     
  7. ThomasC

    ThomasC Lead Actor

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  8. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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  9. Brian Lawrence

    Brian Lawrence Producer

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    Fuji usually sells at stores like Wal-mart for a few dollars less per 4 pack than Kodak.

    I would avoid store brands as they often tend to have kind of a faded and murky look to them when compared to Fuji or Kodak. I also have found Polaroid to be a rather shitty brand of film.
     

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