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Philips- What It Is NOT!

Discussion in 'Displays' started by GeorgeAB, Apr 8, 2004.

  1. GeorgeAB

    GeorgeAB Second Unit

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    It appears that Philips' marketing and engineering departments took a trip to some resort together, got stinking drunk and cooked this mess up:

    http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/WEBONLY.../0404tool.html

    What a fiasco! For a more detailed explanation of how they have incorporated this otherwise potentially beneficial feature check:

    http://www.press.ce.philips.com/uplo...e_Brochure.pdf

    Their version of backlighting is apparently INTENDED to ruin the picture on their expensive new TVs and/or induce vomiting in the viewer!

    Nice idea for parties, I guess. Let's break out the blacklights and incense.

    Just when we think we're gaining some ground in educating the manufacturers and consumers about the importance of adhering to sound principles of imaging science, a major manufacturer pulls a stunt like this. The correct implementation of 6500K backlighting can greatly improve display performance and viewing comfort. Philips has provided a classic example of "what it is NOT"!

    Best regards and beautiful pictures,
    G.Alan Brown, President
    www.cinemaquestinc.com

    "Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
     
  2. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    I see the color of the backlight changes to the "tint" of the screen. Seems like a neat feature but I'd like to see how it performs before I buy into it. Maybe it is indeed a 6500k light with color filters? Or would that change the values too much?
     
  3. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Wow. That is a cool, but insanely stupid idea. [​IMG]

    Maybe some day they'll build in strobe lights on the front too. They'll flash on dark scenes to improve perceived black levels.

    And then the smears in your eyes when they go off will increase white level perception. yay!

    [​IMG]
     
  4. GeorgeAB

    GeorgeAB Second Unit

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  5. GeorgeAB

    GeorgeAB Second Unit

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    What they have done is build an LED array into the back of the TV. It appears the array includes red, green, blue and white LEDs. They never specifically mention if the array can produce 6500 kelvins.

    Oddly enough, that's the only color suitable for video backlighting and they ignore the issue. They do say there is are sensors that trigger some kind of automatic control of the LEDs but don't elaborate. The only exception would be when a TV has another color temperature option set up in a memory for watching black and white films at 5400K. In that case, 5400K backlighting would be prefered.

    What Philips has done has legitimate potential for value. Their suggestion that vividly colored backlighting has value while watching television is preposterous and counterproductive. They could have installed a fog generator while they were at it. That would be cool, too. Oh, wait, that could make the picture harder to see. Yeah, but no other manufacturer will have fog generators in their TVs! Yeah, that's the ticket! Hey, while we're at it, let's make a little rubber monkey jump out of the frame and run around the edge of the cabinet, screaming its head off, once for every hour on the clock, at the strike of the hour. We could call it "Primate Time Television".

    Best regards and beautiful pictures,
    G. Alan Brown, President
    CinemaQuest, Inc.

    "Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
     
  6. Bill Will

    Bill Will Screenwriter

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    I'll take the monkey because it only comes around every hour [​IMG] Can this feature be turned on/off? It sounds like a gimick to me but gimick's do sell things [​IMG]
     
  7. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    There's nothing new under the sun.

    Sylvania in the 50's when they were a major tv player and not a brand name tacked onto a Chinese import had a feature called Halo Light.

    In the 50s, tv sets had rounded corners on the crts. The tube face was surrounded by a "picture frame" and the face and frame were in turn behind a flat glass pane.

    Sylvania made sets on which the "picture frame" around the tube face was white translucent material and had little lights behind the frame which came on when you turned on the set, so the "frame" around the tube had a medium-bright glow, hence the term "halo light".

    The purpose of this was to help prevent eyestrain and make the picture itself look more contrasty.

    Also at that time in the 50s, sets were not all that bright and that pane of glass on the front was highly reflective. As a result there was a large market for "tv lamps". These were decorative lamps, often shaped like seashells, that took low wattage bulbs. The front of the lamp looked like an opaque ceramic knicknack, the lamp shined only out the back, and was meant to be placed on top of the tv and shine on the wall behind it, just like this led array on the Phillips. The idea was to turn off all the lights that would reflect on the tv screen and turn on the tv light so you weren't watching totally in the dark which was regarded as very dangerous to eyesight, along with sitting within 6 feet of the screen. (At a time when screensize averaged 17-21")

    When I saw this thread and looked at the pic of what Phillips had done with this backlighting it made me think the Phillips folks had found one of those old Sylvanias, or found a "tv light" at a garage sale and decided to do a variation.
     
  8. GeorgeAB

    GeorgeAB Second Unit

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    Steve,

    Thanks for the elaborate history. I was aware of some of it. The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers took the principles further, studied the human factors impact and elevated the method to specific recommended practice in the pro arena. It's the characteristics of the human visual system that is at the root of the technique. Humans are definitely not "new under the sun".

    Best regards and beautiful pictures,
    G. Alan Brown, President
    CinemaQuest, Inc.
    www.ideal-lume.com

    "Advancing the art and science of electronic imaging"
     

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