What's new

Ronald Epstein

Founder
Owner
Senior HTF Member
Joined
Jul 3, 1997
Messages
59,547
Real Name
Ronald Epstein
Paramount Celebrates the 100th Anniversary of One of the Most Iconic
Films of the Silent Era


image003.jpg


Newly Restored Classic Debuts on Limited-Edition Blu-ray™ as Part of the Paramount Presents Line October 19, 2021 with New Special Features, Including a Fascinating Look at the Film
and its Enduring Power



Originally released in 1921 at the height of the nation’s appetite for motion pictures, the epic romantic drama THE SHEIK became a massive sensation, breaking box office records and earning over $1 million during its first year of release. 100 years later, Paramount Pictures celebrates this towering classic of the silent film era with a brand-new Blu-ray release, arriving as part of the Paramount Presents line on
October 19, 2021.



Based on the best-selling novel of the same name, THE SHEIK was directed by George Melford and stars the legendary Rudolph Valentino as the title character. The role helped propel Valentino into stardom and sealed his status as a Hollywood heartthrob—and the original “Latin Lover”—at the age of 26.



THE SHEIK restoration employed modern technology so viewers can experience the original beauty of this monumental silent film. Since original negatives for silent films rarely exist, Paramount searched the world for the best elements and used a print and an intermediate element called a fine grain. One source of the film yielded better results for image quality, another for intertitles. One of the elements was “stretch-printed” and had to be adjusted digitally during the restoration process. In the silent era there was no standard frame rate, so stretch printing was done to show silent films at 24 frames per second. In addition, tints and tones were digitally applied, guided by an original continuity script from the Paramount archive. The result is the best picture quality THE SHEIK has had since it was originally shown in theaters 100 years ago.

While THE SHEIK was wildly successful, it did provoke controversy, much as the source material had upon its original publication in 1919. Many of the themes and controversial elements of the film are still being grappled with today, a subject that is explored in a new featurette on the Blu-ray with film historian and professor Leslie Midkiff DeBauche entitled “Desert Heat: 100 Years with The Sheik.” The disc also includes a music score by Roger Bellon and access to a Digital copy of the film.



As with all films released in the Paramount Presents line, THE SHEIK is presented with collectible packaging featuring a foldout image of the film’s theatrical poster and an interior spread with key movie moments.



Synopsis

Rudolph Valentino is Ahmed Ben Hassan, a charming Arabian sheik who becomes infatuated with the adventurous, modern-thinking Englishwoman Lady Diana Mayo, played by Agnes Ayres. When the sheik abducts Lady Diana, the two clash, but ultimately profess their love for one another in this quintessential “desert romance” that effectively capitalized on the popularity of the genre.




Paramount Presents: THE SHEIK

Street Date: October 19, 2021

U.S. Rating: Not Rated


Thank you for supporting HTF when you preorder using the link below. If you are using an adblocker you will not see link. As an Amazon Associate HTF earns from qualifying purchases

 
Last edited:

t1g3r5fan

Reviewer
Joined
Jul 1, 2012
Messages
1,016
Location
Salem, Oregon
Real Name
Mychal Bowden
I missed out on the OOP Kino release, so I'm definitely looking forward to this release.

While we talking about Paramount silents on Blu-ray, I'm hoping that Paramount can produce a standalone release of the 1923 version of The Ten Commandments (I know, but I'd like one that doesn't require me to buy the 1956 remake as well).
 

battlebeast

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
3,586
Location
Edmonton, Alberta
Real Name
Warren
I’m getting one copy. I don’t have the KINO release. I didn’t think KINO had a deal with Paramount.

I wonder if Paramount will
Rerelease WINGS…
 

moviepas

Supporting Actor
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
701
And The Wedding March is the better movie. I only wish the second part were not lost.

The story of what happened to that is rather odd in that a lot of films were left in an open courtyard near vaults and a fire happened, so they say, which included rare prints from other archives on loan for screenings including Goldwyn's Street Scene(1931). But, hey, I have a DVD of that one. What is true who knows but since other archives like the BFI/UK and MOMA had been accused of copying loaned rarities(I have no problem with other archives doing that with one-of-a-kind films on Nitrate) how did this one miss out? I have two books on Henry Langlois and have read both and there are too many contradictions between the two.
 

Vern Dias

Second Unit
Joined
Apr 27, 1999
Messages
259
Real Name
Theodore V Dias
Yes and this time dump the godawful Gaylord Carter noise and give it a proper orchestral underscore.
Shame on You! The "noise" you refer to is the musical score performed on a theatre organ, which is how the VAST majority of patrons experienced the original performances of this classic film (and many other silent films).

Very few theatres could afford an 8 or 10 piece pit orchestra, much less a full orchestra. The theatre organ could easily recreate the sounds and various instrument families (strings, reeds, brass, percussion, etc.) of a symphony orchestra and a bunch of other effects, such as wind, thunder, train whistles, and automobile horns. This made it the ideal instrument to accompany silent films.

For those who might want to learn more:

https://www.atos.org/about/history/theatre-organ
 

Thomas T

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2001
Messages
7,892
Shame on You! The "noise" you refer to is the musical score performed on a theatre organ, which is how the VAST majority of patrons experienced the original performances of this classic film (and many other silent films).

Very few theatres could afford an 8 or 10 piece pit orchestra, much less a full orchestra. The theatre organ could easily recreate the sounds and various instrument families (strings, reeds, brass, percussion, etc.) of a symphony orchestra and a bunch of other effects, such as wind, thunder, train whistles, and automobile horns. This made it the ideal instrument to accompany silent films.

For those who might want to learn more:

https://www.atos.org/about/history/theatre-organ
Thanks for the history lesson but this is 2021, not 1921. Even most churches have dumped the organ. A symphonic underscore give silent films more texture and nuance instead of a droning organ. Imagine replacing Carl Davis's or Carmine Coppola's symphonic scores to Gance's Napoleon with a whining organ. Heaven help us!
 

Ed Lachmann

Screenwriter
Joined
Mar 17, 2011
Messages
1,401
Real Name
Edmund Lachmann
Can't wait, this will be a day one purchase for me. I also hope that Paramount will continue to mine their silent classics for possible HD releases. Every day I cross my fingers and search online for a restored 1914 Cabiria release, which the Museo Nazionale del Cinema in Turin has in its collection. I've read that the restoration and the re-recorded original score are fabulous. Never found it yet but keep hoping.
 

Arthur Powell

Supporting Actor
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
512
Real Name
Arthur
And The Wedding March is the better movie. I only wish the second part were not lost.
The Sheik is certainly not great art, but it's iconic as can be. I imagine that if you were to ask "the man on the street" to name a couple silents, (A) most wouldn't be able to do so and (B) the few that could would likely cite this Valentino film because of how it is even a century later still part of pop culture. I also imagine that this is one of those "prestige" releases not necessarily designed to make money. From what I have heard, Paramount took a bath on the 1980s VHS silents line, and a few years back they were disappointed with the returns on their magnificent Wings blu-ray. Unless they're either delusional or ignorant, they have to know what the sales potential of this release is. That said, I passed on Kino's blu (which I think was Paramount-licensed) because I was satisfied with the David Shepard DVD. Since I'm sort of intrigued, I'll pick up this release. That makes me number five, doesn't it?
I agree that The Wedding March is the better film, and if Criterion has the license, I wish they would get on the ball with it. While I would definitely prefer for the second part to survive, I have to admit that the ending on the 1928 release version is about as perfect as you can get if you know your world history - bittersweet, poignant, ironic, and a little dash of dark humor.

Yes and this time dump the godawful Gaylord Carter noise and give it a proper orchestral underscore.
Strong disagree from me as well. That Gaylord Carter "noise" is excellent and supports the film very well. I cherish all of my DVDs and blu-rays that feature that man's "noise."
 

RichMurphy

Supporting Actor
Joined
Jun 15, 2005
Messages
661
Location
Alexandria, VA
Real Name
Rich
Thanks for the history lesson but this is 2021, not 1921. Even most churches have dumped the organ. A symphonic underscore give silent films more texture and nuance instead of a droning organ. Imagine replacing Carl Davis's or Carmine Coppola's symphonic scores to Gance's Napoleon with a whining organ. Heaven help us!
As I recall, twice during the live presentation of the Coppola version, the orchestra took a break and a "whining" organ took over for a while.

I am biased, because my dad was a theatre organist and helped restore a local theatre organ before his (and the theatre's) death.
 

Arthur Powell

Supporting Actor
Joined
Feb 15, 2018
Messages
512
Real Name
Arthur
Thanks for the history lesson but this is 2021, not 1921. Even most churches have dumped the organ. A symphonic underscore give silent films more texture and nuance instead of a droning organ. Imagine replacing Carl Davis's or Carmine Coppola's symphonic scores to Gance's Napoleon with a whining organ. Heaven help us!
Yet Carmine Coppola's score features solo interludes with that "whining" instrument. Strangely enough, that score is actually influenced to some degree by traditional methods of silent film scoring. There's nothing droning about organ scores, and given the immense versatility and "voicing" of the theater organs, they are well equipped to provide the texture and nuance. For example, as good as Carl Davis' score for The Thief of Bagdad is, it's Gaylord Carter's Wurlitzer score that makes the film's exoticism and adventure a palpable force. Davis treats the film almost like a delicate museum piece, but Carter treats it as a grand and immediate piece of entertainment. That said, to be fair I will note that I marginally prefer Davis over Carter for Safety Last! Be it 1921, 2021, or 2121, a good score is a good score whether it's piano, organ, or orchestral.
BTW - church and theater organs are two different beasts. They're about as different as a cello is from a violin.
 
Last edited:

Mark VH

Second Unit
Joined
May 2, 2005
Messages
398
Sadly, I agree. I don't know where the market is for silent films of this sort.

Yep. And don't get me wrong, a major studio committing significant dollars to restoring and releasing a silent film in 2021 on physical media is absolutely cause for celebration, no matter how many copies they move. Just seems like they're fighting such an uphill battle with a movie that isn't really an established classic. Nobody would be happier than me to be wrong.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Forum Sponsors

Latest Articles

Forum statistics

Threads
348,680
Messages
4,853,341
Members
142,363
Latest member
Alain A.
Recent bookmarks
0
Top