pet boundary fencing systems....

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Ted Lee, May 27, 2005.

  1. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hi all -

    does anyone have any personal experience with these things. i was looking at something along the following lines:

    various pet fencing systems from petsmart

    i'm not very familiar with these things, so i don't really know if one system works better then another.

    in my specific situation, there is really only one fenceline (which backs up to an open ravine) that i need to worry about. the other three sides of my fence are all enclosed wood, but the one that backs up to the ravine is an open-iron design.

    i kind of like the wireless radio setup ... i think that way i can also train my pet to stay within bounds in the front yard.

    ----

    it seems that they work by shocking the pet (obviously at safe levels) ... but does anyone know how effective that is?

    anyway, if anyone has any thoughts or opinions on these, please let me know.

    thx!
     
  2. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I don't have any personal experience, but my good friend is a dog trainer and she SWEARS by these things. I usually walk around my block and it seems like every home has one of these systems installed. They must work because all the dogs come running (when they see me walking by) and they tend to stay within the limits of the invisible fence.I don't know if I read the following story here, but there was a story where a woman had a small dog and a coyote grabbed the dog (in its' mouth) and ran away with it. When the coyote reached the invisiblele fence, the collar went off and shocked the dog (as well as the coyote). It freaked out the coyote and it dropped the dog and ran off.

    I'd say that dog owner is praising the invisible fence [​IMG]
     
  3. Brandon_S

    Brandon_S Second Unit

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    Ted,

    My family has an invisible dog fence installed on their 5 acre property. The fence runs around the entire boundry of the yard.

    From my personal experience this system of dog containment works amazingly well. We have used it with our yellow lab Cisco since he was a puppy. He tends to be on the shy side so maybe that is one reason it is so effective.

    Once a dog is properly trained with the system (usually through a series of flags that are placed along the boundry lines) they will associate the warning beeps from the collar with the thought of being shocked. This works well because after a few run-ins with the fence during training, your average dog won't want to be shocked again. There are exceptions but if properly trained the dog will avoid the fenceline.

    This is by far the best and most humane way to keep a dog in a set place. I say humane because the dog will be able to roam freely in the majority of the yard and won't be confined to a pen. I would never have another dog unless I had some type of underground barrier system. It is worth every penny!
     
  4. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    thanks for the info guys. so does that mean that the dog will forever have to wear the collar? i thought the dog would, over time, just get used to where the boundary is?

    and what about if i decide to take the pet for a walk or something? besides obviously turning off the system, will the pet still associate the boundary and not want to ever leave the house? maybe i could teach her that "no collar" means no boundary....
     
  5. Jon_Gregory

    Jon_Gregory Stunt Coordinator

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    Here's how it works and worked with my dog. We put the invisible fence and kept the collar on her when ever she went outside. It took her about 1 week before she learned that there was no way to get past the shock. She tried every avenue of approach all over the yard. When we wanted her to cross the boundry we would turn the collar off and call her across. Now she no longer needs the collar and will stay within the boundries on her own. If we want her to cross the boundry, she knows that if we call her across the boundry that it will not shock her. But if we don't call her across it, she stays put. I have noticed that after about 4 months she will get brave and we will need to remind her, by putting the collar on her again, that it will still shock her. It only takes about a day of reinforcement and the collar comes back off.
     
  6. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    My neighbors have invisible fencing and like it. One of the dogs, a terrier, will occasionally escape the yard. The problem then is that it won't come back in, since it knows it will be shocked.

    My family, who are dog-owners, prefer real fencing. They observe that these systems will keep your dogs in but won't keep other animals out. This could be dangerous for your dog or for the interloper. (One sister has an in-tact male Swissie, which is a extremely friendly dog with people and other family pets, but could kill an unknown intruding male dog.)
     
  7. Brandon_S

    Brandon_S Second Unit

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    Ted,

    Since my family lives in a rural area the only time our dog would leave the yard would be in a vehicle. Generally we remove the collar and replace it with a standard collar when we take him to the farm or vet. However, since the car would sit fairly high off the ground he would not be shocked even if we left the collar on him. With our system, the collar has to be within a few feet of the wire in the ground to operate properly.

    When our lab out grew his first collar we bought a leather collar and fit the "shock box" to it. Most collars come with interchangable prods that can be used in summer and winter months (when their coats become thinner and thicker respectively). As long as the collar isn't too tight, the dog should become used to it very quickly.

    Hope this answers all your questions. By far the worst aspect is installing the system yourself! It isn't very forgiving on the back if you know what I mean.

    Best of luck!
     
  8. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    thx again guys. i'm going to try the wireless system first. undoubtedly it's not going to be as effective as a hard-wired setup, but i'm not ready to invest all that time and money just yet. if i find the wireless to be semi-effective, then if i start having probs related directly to the wireless aspect i'll probably upgrade.

    i think the key will be seeing how she handles the boundary issues.
     

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