pb2+ corner placement most likely a good option?

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Todd smith, May 6, 2004.

  1. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2002
    Messages:
    643
    Likes Received:
    0
    My room is 12wx22lx7h. I sold my vtf-3 and am planning on a pb2+ (or pc ultra). I was hoping to place the pb2+ in the corner just like my vtf-3 which was about 5inches from the back wall and 2inches from the side wall. Would I most likely get great performance with the pb2+ in this same postition? The vtf-3 was front firing while the pb2+ is down firing. I could also put it anywhere along the side wall (about 2-4 inches out), or use it as an end table. My fear is getting the pb2+ home and finding out that the best place for it will be something other than my options and possibly having to return it for a cylinder. I have heard the pb2+ can be hard to place. What do you guys think?
     
  2. Rick Cohen

    Rick Cohen Agent

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2004
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    0
    I use the PB2+ in a corner as an end table and it has worked out very well. As you well know each room is different but if your VTF-3 worked well in that position there is no reason the PB2+ should not. Get ready for your couch to shake and for you to have the feeling something very large is breathing nearby when the bass creates a breeze. RICK
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2000
    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think that the general consensus is, that the corner is best for raw output. But other places in the room might be best for the flattest freq response.

    The problem is that I have seen both of the following as recommendations:

    a) 1/3 or 2/5 down the longest wall
    b) 1/2 down a wall

    As suggestions, but it can't be both, so I don't know which one to believe. Usually something as big as a sub is hard to "conceal" anywhere else than a corner anyway. [​IMG]

    But one recommendation that I can believe (if it's possible in any particular room), is to put the sub as close as you can to the listening position. I've always thought about trying mine as an end table right next to my futon. But never got motivated enough to move it out of the corner where it's at now. [​IMG]
     
  4. Robb Roy

    Robb Roy Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Todd,

    I've heard some mention about box subs being harder to place than cylinders, also. Frankly, the only logical reason for that I can see is they are heavier to move and/or the larger footprint may prevent placing it in the optimum location. If you have the room for a box format, and the back to move it, it should be no more difficult to place (from an acoustic standpoint) than a cylinder.

    -Robb
     
  5. MikeLi

    MikeLi Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 6, 2003
    Messages:
    945
    Likes Received:
    0
    My room is about the same size and it wound up in the front left corner was the best. About 5" out from the side wall with tubes facing that wall and about 2" from the front wall. I could get alittle better by moving alittle back on the side wall but with all the extra power I have as it is why bother. I never have to have the gain up over 1/2 and thats only when really wanting it to kick on a good action flick.
     
  6. Serge Breton

    Serge Breton Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2001
    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    0
    Todd,

    hopefully you will have more success than i did with a 7ft ceiling. I had some major room nodes in my frequency response at 30hz, 60hz and had and a smaller null at around 80hz. This is when i placed the PB2+ in the rear corners of my ht room where the 7ft drop ceiling is. It was difficult to incorperate but now i have the sub in the front left corner similar to Mike's set-up and i am now very satisfied. I know the nulls are gone but i still have some tweaking to do yet. I have an 8ft ceiling in this area and for the bulk of the room. Hopefully you have some better luck with your set-up. The laws of physics cannot be cheated however, especially when dealing with nulls (dips in the frequency which equals no bass at all at those frequencies).
     
  7. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2002
    Messages:
    643
    Likes Received:
    0
    My ceiling is anywhere from 6'6"-7' in the house I am ready to move into. Does this mean the theater will sound like garbage? Or should I say does this mean the bass will sound like garbage according to the laws of physics?
     
  8. Robb Roy

    Robb Roy Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2002
    Messages:
    711
    Likes Received:
    0
    Todd,

    the acoustics in your room for your subwoofer are nearly impossible to predict, and are affected by so many factors other than your ceiling height. You won't know for certain until you get into your house. There is absolutely no reason to worry about it until then.

    -Robb
     
  9. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2000
    Messages:
    5,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Shoot, I don't have the equations at hand, but you can calculate the most common modes of any room by looking at the 3 dimensions: height, width, and depth.

    I did this, and what I measured was really close to what I calculated. Kind of neat actually. [​IMG]
     

Share This Page