Paying by credit card and signing that electronic gizmo.

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Wade, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. Wade

    Wade Stunt Coordinator

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    I hate signing these things. I've always refused to sign them and have never had a problem until the other night. I went to Circuit City to purchase an HDTV antenna, which they had, and went to pay for it as usual. Upon refusing to sign the gizmo the salesgirl said she'd have to get a managers approval (why?), I said okay. She asked for my credit card and drivers license and trotted back to the managers office. After a minute she came back folding up a piece of paper as she walked. I knew instantly that she had photocopied both my credit card and drivers license, sure enough she did. I'm talking blown up images here. I immediately asked for that copy and told the salesgirl I would take my business to Best Buy. Went to BB and didn't have a problem doing this, same goes for the radio shack I went to after that.

    Why did they have to copy my drivers license and credit card? What were they going to do with that copy? I left a little pissed but the more I thought about it the more pissed I got. I'm probably putting to much into it as it was probably an inexperienced crew working that afternoon.

    Anybody else experience anything like this.

    Wade
     
  2. Jesse Leonard

    Jesse Leonard Second Unit

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    I wouldn't want them to photocopy my stuff either. But what's the big deal with signing the electronic gizmo?
     
  3. JamesED

    JamesED Second Unit

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    I wouldn't like them photo copying my stuff either, but if I can avoid all that hassle by signing a little gizmo, I would. What is so bad about them you have to simply refuse to sign them?
     
  4. Wade

    Wade Stunt Coordinator

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    I guess I like signing for things the old fashion way, with a real pen. The real kicker here is that if I would have signed the gizmo first then the cashier would have never verified the info to my card. I would have paid, signed and walked out without the cashier checking my credit card. 9 times out of 10 when my wife signs these things the cashier never verifies anything. My wife just puts the card back in her purse and leaves. A lot of people probably don't sign with their real signature as well. How does signing electronically make things more secure? It seems like just a way to eliminate paper work for the store.

    Places like Radio Shack simply tap a button that states "customer refuses to sign electronically" or something along those lines, then a paper receipt prints out for me to sign. What's the big deal with that.

    I was okay with the girl getting the managers approval, but why the need to photocopy my cards? Couldn't the girl or manager verify my signature to both cards (the way it's always been done) and send me on my way. The photocopying went over the line for me. It's not like I was applying for a home loan or anything.

    Wade
     
  5. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Cash would solve a lot of these issues, especially for small purchases.
     
  6. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    Yep.

    Plus, signing a physical piece of paper just creates an additional receipt with both your card information and your signature which has to be put in the cash drawer, reconciled at the end of the day, and shuffled around through the store accounting system and possibly throughout the office where any staff member may be able to see or copy or pick it up. Working in my parents grocery store it's amazing how hard it is to keep track of all those little pieces of paper. They end up in the darndest, not to mention non-secure, places. By signing electronically, I believe everything remains stored within the computer system. So if you're doing it because you feel it's more secure, I'd suggest you reconsider.

    And speaking from my experience in our store, so many people are legitimately using other people's cards (spouses cards, kids using parents cards, girl/boy friends using each others' cards) that you'd be turning away a lot of sales if you strictly enforced names and signatures. Not to mention most people treat their cards horribly and their signatures are scratched, smudged, and basically illegible so it's impossible to match them anyway. And most people's signatures are essentially no better than a "X" anyway, just a meaningless scribble that doesn't readily represent even real alpha characters.
     
  7. Michael Harris

    Michael Harris Screenwriter

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    I like the electronic gizmos but some are better then others. I've noticed that the models that have a small roller in the stylus do a better job in allowing me to make a legible signature.

    I do wish that all credit cards would have a picture of the user on it. With all the identity theft going on it would certainly help.
     
  8. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    I'm glad RadioShack learned from their "required phone number" policy from a year or two back. You can always just sign a big X. Seriously...
     
  9. Rex Bachmann

    Rex Bachmann Screenwriter

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    Wade wrote (post #4):


    But exactly whose computer system? There's no way I believe that an "electronic signature" is stored only on any big chain store's computer systems. Like almost every damned thing else in these days of the "information age", I believe this "information" is shared with third parties without the consumer's knowledge or permission (like credit and housing information, for instance). And then, too, there're the always active computer crackers ("hackers") a lot of big businesses, including the banks, do not want the public to know about. That's why I stopped refusing to sign overtly and just started always giving them the old "falsie".

    Tough if they don't like it.
     
  10. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    Its a standard security feature. I could write an e-mail to SEARS headquarters and they could fax me a collection of every receipt I ever "signed". then I could see first-hand and one with a incorrect signature.
     
  11. ThomasC

    ThomasC Lead Actor

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    I never thought about it making things more secure, I just thought it was something to eliminate some paper work for the store. I'm one of those dumb customers. [​IMG]
     
  12. Don Black

    Don Black Screenwriter

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    In order to get a lower credit card processing rate from Visa, MC, AmEx, Discover, they are required to get your signature. Again, it's all about saving the store $.
     
  13. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    It always pissed me off when stores would ask for my phone number. I grew tired of arguing with cashiers making minimum wage about this and just started giving out a fake number.
     
  14. Scott Tucker

    Scott Tucker Stunt Coordinator

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    I wouldn't let you out of the store w/o signing either the electronic gizmo, or an old fashioned carbon copy slip with the cc info imprinted on it. And yes, electronic signing is always more secure for the consumer.
     
  15. Marc_Sulinski

    Marc_Sulinski Supporting Actor

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    Legally, is anyone but the person whose name is on the card allowed to use it, whether they received permission or not?
     
  16. JamesMH

    JamesMH Stunt Coordinator

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    If a shop asks to see your ID when you use a CC, you can refuse. You do not have to show your ID. If the shop requests that, complain.

    Here in California they ask for my ID 80% of the time, in Ohio/PA, I could lend my CC to someone, they'd never check for ID. Must be all the illegals here.
     
  17. Chris Lockwood

    Chris Lockwood Producer

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    > I do wish that all credit cards would have a picture of the user on it. With all the identity theft going on it would certainly help.

    You can get one for yourself if you think it's a good idea.

    Where does the credit card company get the photo? I assume you send one in. So what's to stop an identity thief from sending HIS photo with YOUR name & address on a falsified credit app to get a card in your name that looks more valid?

    At least with a photo ID like a driver's license, you have to physically go to the place that issues it to get the photo taken, so they know it's really you. I don't see how that would be enforced with credit cards, unless they set up places to go get your picture taken.

    I've only been asked for a photo ID a couple of times, & it was always for a small amount, like under $20. I showed them the ID, then commented that if I was the type who would steal someone's credit card, rather than buying a $10 meal with it I'd probably be getting expensive electronics or something.
     
  18. Dome Vongvises

    Dome Vongvises Lead Actor

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    It depends. As far as I know, there are certain merchant agreements that state you don't have to show ID or even have the back of the card signed. That applies to Visa and Master Card. In other words, don't lose the damn card or you're fucked.

    But I do know that is not the case with American Express or Discover. You have to show ID and/or have the back signed.

    I never understood the mentality of not showing ID. It begs the question, why should anybody have problem showing ID? I'm proud that merchants ask for my ID when I make a credit card purchase. Anybody can fake a signature. And if somebody went through the trouble of making a fake state-issued ID like a driver's license, you've got bigger problems on your hand.
     
  19. Rex Bachmann

    Rex Bachmann Screenwriter

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    JamesMH wrote (post #16):


    Non sequitur. I've got news for you, the "illegals" are everywhere: North, East, (deep) South, West, and Midwest. And, in fact, Ohio had its own little scandal a few years back on employers' hiring practices in that regard.

    I moved to Ohio in the '90s from the Northeast and there was a marked difference there in their trustfulness to what one encounters on the Eastern seaboard. In New Jersey, I had to pay or leave a credit card before doing a self-service gasoline fill-up. When I got into the state of Ohio and took the attendant my credit card, he acted bothered and annoyed ("What? Are you crazy?"). Fill up first, then pay!

    I think you will find that in urban areas on both coasts---and probably in the Great Lakes urban centers as well---there's a whole lot of mistrust in money-related social transactions. It's not just against "illegals", nor especially because of them, either.
     
  20. JamesMH

    JamesMH Stunt Coordinator

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    I have noticed that if I'm in the middle of nowhere in California or Nevada, its still pump then pay. If you get to Oregon, its don't touch that pump ever . . unless you're on a motorcycle, crazy laws there.
     

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