Password protected *folders* in WinME or Win2000?

Craig Chatterton

Stunt Coordinator
Joined
Apr 18, 1999
Messages
148
You can protect the folder so no one other than *you* can access it, but with Windows 2000, that depends on you protecting your password for logging in.
I think you can also download programs that encrypt directories or files and you'd have to enter a password to unencrypt the file/folder. Check http://www.download.com to find one.
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MichaelPe

Screenwriter
Joined
Feb 22, 1999
Messages
1,115
Could you explain?
I'll give it a shot...
In Windows 2000 (and ME, I think), you can create different user profiles, so that a logon is required when starting the computer. Therefore, you can create a "Rob" user and a "Family" user. (These settings can be found in the Control Panel under "Users & Passwords".)
Then, in Windows, you can assign "Sharing" properties to individual folders and drives, so you can prohibit 'Family' from accessing 'C:RobDocs'.
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Rob Speicher

Supporting Actor
Joined
Nov 24, 2000
Messages
935
If you have a drive formatted in NTFS, you can set securities on that drive/folder/file by going to the properties for that item, and clicking the security tab. From there, remove 'Everyone' access to the folder and add only your account to that folder.
Again, this will only work if the drive is formatted with NTFS.
 

Iain Lambert

Screenwriter
Joined
Jun 7, 1999
Messages
1,345
As a slightly kludgy workaround, if its just a few files you need to protect, you could turn it into a 'compressed folder' which is just a zip file, and password protect the zip, I suppose. I've not tried this yet, and my ME box is at home, so you'll have to test it yourself.
 

Roy C.

Second Unit
Joined
Jul 20, 1999
Messages
356
The WinZip thing would work regardless of OS but I would also recommend doing it the way Rob recommended, not only because it's better and easier to use, but because NTFS is a better format and it uses drive space more efficiently (smaller sectors=more usable space). You can also set the drive to be compressed which gives you even more space to work with.
Roy C.
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