Partitioning drive post-installation

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Jon_Are, May 10, 2003.

  1. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    I installed, with the support of some HTF folks, an 80 GB drive and I'm up and running; it went as smoothly as I dared hope. I now boast two drives - an 80 and a 36 - and they're humming along nicely. I'm about 80% finished with re-installing my software and data (whew).

    One question does remain: during the installation, I was never prompted to create partitions (unless it somehow slipped by me). So now, I have one giant 80GB partition. My plan was to install the OS on a small partition, as advised here.

    How is this accomplished at this point, now that everything is pretty much installed? Do I need software (such as partition magic)? Is it worth doing?

    Thanks to all who helped me here; it is much appreciated.

    Jon
     
  2. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    Jon, it would have given you the opportunity the partition. If your new drive was empty then it would have had to create a partition.

    Anyway, there's two ways you can split the new drive. You could use Partition Magic or alternatively use Norton Ghost (version 2002 or 2003, preferably the latter) to make an 'image' file of your new installation and save it to the second drive. It would then be down to you to create the partitions and then restore the Ghost image back into the first one on the drive. I use that method all the time and have never had a problem. Partition Magic can mess up sometimes.
     
  3. Hanson

    Hanson Producer

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    Yeah, I'd be a bit wary of mucking with partitions after the fact.

    Ghost will work, but you could just as well use the Windows backup program included in XP.
     
  4. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    Backup wont do the job. The one big partition needs to be deleted and then recreated with the other ones Jon wants on the same drive.
     
  5. Hanson

    Hanson Producer

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    You create the backup to the second drive.

    You reformat the first drive and install the OS on the partition you want. Then you restore from the second drive (in safe mode).
     
  6. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    Exactly, you'd need to reinstall the OS. Ghost images the entire drive, OS, boot sector, everything. He could have the new configuration up and running in a hour rather than spend a day getting XP and all the apps installed and working just-so.
     
  7. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    Wouldn't Ghost require something like 15-20 discs to image the entire drive??

    Jon
     
  8. Hanson

    Hanson Producer

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    Yeah but -- how much does Ghost cost? It doesn't take more than 1 hour to install XP anyway.

    Besides, you can backup and restore the entire drive including the registry. You won't need to reinstall the programs and drivers.
     
  9. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    I already own Ghost 2003, so the cost is not a consideration.

    I'm just wondering how practical it is to spend so much time and use so many (admittedly inexpensive) discs to make a back-up that will, very quickly, become out-dated.

    Or maybe I'm looking at this wrong. Is it reasonable to perform this massive Ghost backup just once (preserving registry settings, applications, and drivers), then frequently back up just my data thereafter?

    Jon
     
  10. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  11. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  12. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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  13. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    Man, this is getting frustrating.

    I did a copy of drive C, using Ghost, onto drive F. Everything seemed to go smoothly.

    Now, I cannot open the Ghost program in drive F (which I'm sure I'll need to do in order to restore the copy to C, once C is re-formatted and partitioned).

    How do I find the copy I made? How do I open Ghost from within My Computer?

    (I assume I click on the GhostStart file, but that did nothing. Just to see what would happen, I went into the C drive and clicked on that same file, nothing opened there, either.)

    I have no clue how I would re-store that drive.

    Jon
     
  14. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    Jon,
    First of all, did you clone or make an image of drive C: onto F:? It sounds like you've done an image but I wanted to check.

    You wont be able to run the Ghost program from F:. Once you've rearranged your new partitions you'll need to boot into DOS and run the ghost.exe file from there. The .exe file is only 600-something kb so it will easily fit on a floppy disk.

    I think Ghost (the bit you installed into Windows) has a boot-disk creation facility - look under 'Utilities' on the main Ghost window. That will probably create everything you need onto a floppy.

    Once you're in DOS and have started ghost.exe it's simply a case of performing a Partition >> From Image (when you see the simple DOS GUI you'll understand it better). It will prompt you for the source file (which is on F) and ask where you want the image restored to - in this case your new C: drive. The image will then be restored and you'll have your same XP installation as you have now but with the extra partition(s) in place.
     
  15. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  16. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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  17. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  18. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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  19. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  20. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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