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Paramount, The Truman Show and Star Trek: TMP - Special Longer Version need proper releases

Discussion in 'Blu-ray and UHD' started by ChrisCook, Feb 6, 2019.

  1. joshEH

    joshEH Producer

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    Though there are some new trims made in the Director's Edition that just seem inexplicable and are hugely annoying, like the missing, second "Viewer off!!" by Kirk during the first rec-deck scene, and which appear to have been made not by Wise personally, but by his collaborators like Darren Dochterman. If they were to reinstate those weirdly-snipped moments (which do add in teaspoons of what this film has arguably always needed the most, raw human emotion), I certainly wouldn't mind.
     
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  2. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    I strongly prefer the Special Longer Version over the Director's Edition in part because of trims like in the DE, which seem designed more to move the narrative along rather than allowing the horror the crew feels at what they're about to face to play out. I think it does a disservice to the story, because this mission is supposed to be The Big One, the thing that no one is prepared for and has no preconceived idea of how to deal with. Uhura needing to be told twice to turn the viewer off is important, because it shows us that our normally unflappable crew is facing a challenge so serious that they actually are rattled. It's the same reason that Kirk's "oh my god" in the transporter room after that accident is important; we're not used to seeing our guys rattled, but the stakes are so high and the odds are so bad that the normally unflappable Kirk can't help but show emotion publicly after witnessing such a horrific accident.

    Even little things in the movie that are changed in the DE seemed to have purpose in their original design. In the original version and special longer version, the computer voice is robotic and cold, and frequently heard in the background. This is mostly eliminated in the Director's Edition; the reason given on the commentary was to warm up the film and the environment of the ship. But I would argue that the initial choice was correct. This Enterprise is essentially a brand new ship, and although the people staffing it are experienced hands, they're now in a new and unfamiliar environment, one that isn't actually ready to go. The ship isn't supposed to look or sound lived in. It's supposed to be cold, unwelcoming and unforgiving, because no one has had a chance to make it their home yet. It adds to the sense of uncertainty that the crew shows, because not only are they facing a mission without precedent, they're also going into it with a ship they don't know if they can trust. By eliminating most of those colder, more computerized voices and announcements, they're making the Enterprise feel warm and familiar - which is exactly what it shouldn't be to that crew at that moment in the story.
     
  3. Nelson Au

    Nelson Au Executive Producer

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    Of course you guys know that in 2000 or thereabouts whilest this project was being discussed and then executed, the film was already 20 years old. The general audience and of course the fans knew the film inside and out, theatrical and extended cut. So to shorted things like the fly-by around the Enterprise with Admiral Kirk and Scotty would have been met with displeasure. The flight into the cloud, I agree could be shorter. And all the staring at the screen could be trimmed. I was okay with the cut of Kirk’s second order to turn the viewer off. It could be argued that Uhura is a seasoned professional, and would not hesitate like that. On the other hand, it does show the magnitude of the horror they just saw.

    Josh, interesting point about the ship being cold and unfamiliar. That is a theme of the film that Spock also draws of V’Ger.

    Well, all my hopes for a box set of the 6 films and that Paramount would do a Blade Runner and remaster the theatrical, Longer and Directors Edition of Star Trek The Motion Picture. The film deserves it, and Paramount needs someone there who recognizes the film’s historic stature.

    ( reading your post Josh, and at the risk of posting a spoiler for the series, Star Trek Discovery, I couldn’t help but think about the great design decisions made in Discovery’s version of the Enterprise bridge. )
     
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  4. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    That’s precisely why I like it - because the threat is so overwhelming that even the most seasoned of professionals was still taken aback by it.

    And yeah, agreed on DSC’s Enterprise, it’s very cool - but I’m easy to please, I was happy with the Kelvin bridge too.
     
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  5. Allansfirebird

    Allansfirebird Supporting Actor

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    I just wonder about that. Given the glut of on-set images showing various setpieces in the Memory Wall sequence being filmed (c.f. Marcello Rossi's website: http://www.marcellorossi.info/Memory/Memory.html), my impression has always been the shots involving first unit live action were completed during principal photography. It's that the effects sequences were never completed because Robert Abel and crew were fired off the picture.

    At some point, I'll be making a visit to the Herrick library (now that I've begun to schedule appointments for research I'm doing on the '63 Cleopatra) to review the script revisions and call sheets they have for TMP, and I'll be making an effort to confirm my suspicions. I have found some call sheets on eBay that showed the sequence was filmed, or at least scheduled to be filmed, from 11/27/78-12/6/78.
     
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  6. Osato

    Osato Producer

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    Doesn’t the dvd extras have what was filmed for the memory wall scene?
    Also the return to tomorrow book chronicling the making of the motion picture probably has additional information on the scene too. I recall the set was very expensive. Almost as much as the bridge set? (Making of tmp 1979 book by sackett) https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/225617.The_Making_of_Star_Trek_The_Motion_Picture

    Return to tomorrow link:

    https://creaturefeatures.com/shop/books/returntotomorrow/
     
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  7. Ethan Riley

    Ethan Riley Producer

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    Well they cut out little snippets of lines like when Kirk tells Bones to shut up; those human moments that are sorely needed in this somewhat sterile film. I don't know if they cut the "Shut up, Bones" line because it looked too rude between these old friends, but geez, Bones can annoy anyone. It worked the first time I saw it and the theater audience chuckled a little. It was a real moment.
     
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  8. Peter Neski

    Peter Neski Screenwriter

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    what made you think TS is 1:66 and not 1:85 IMDP says its 1:85 1
     
  9. Joel Fontenot

    Joel Fontenot Screenwriter

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    Weir intended it to be 1.66:1 (IMDB does say this in both the technical specs and in the trivia section), closer to the TV shape as that follows the movie's feel. But, theatrically was cropped to 1.85:1, since most theaters would just leave the same frame matte in the projector.

    As stated, the original non-anamorphic DVD was 1.66:1. I have that DVD.

    I always wondered if there were any instructions about the projected framing on the reels (this was a year before the first TI DLP demonstration, and long before digital distribution), and how many theaters might have actually projected it framed to 1.66:1.
     
  10. Lord Dalek

    Lord Dalek Producer

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    Oh like I would trust IMDB on anything.
     
  11. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

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    I projected it first-run and there wasn't anything in the print cans or via distributor letter that stated "please run at 1:66".
     
  12. Joel Fontenot

    Joel Fontenot Screenwriter

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    Good to know. That's why I asked. Does make the whole "intended" notion seem questionable now. It's possible someone changed his mind as the DVD was being prepped.
     
  13. Worth

    Worth Cinematographer

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    I seem to remember reading something at the time about Peter Weir preferring 1.66 for the video version.
     
  14. Lord Dalek

    Lord Dalek Producer

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    I would imagine today Weir would probably like to have a shifting ratio of 1.33 for the "in show camera" footage and 1.78 for everything else.
     
  15. Lord Dalek

    Lord Dalek Producer

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    That first transfer was done for laserdisc actually. Paramount didn't start doing dedicated DVD transfers until Star Trek Insurrection IIRC.
     
  16. Peter Neski

    Peter Neski Screenwriter

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    where does Weir say its 1:66?
     
  17. ChrisCook

    ChrisCook Screenwriter

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    I was unable to edit my post further, so I'll fix it here:

     
  18. ChrisCook

    ChrisCook Screenwriter

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  19. Peter Neski

    Peter Neski Screenwriter

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    do Paramount even release older titles hat aren't Star Trek??
     
  20. Johnny Angell

    Johnny Angell Played With Dinosaurs Member

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