paradigm sensitivity ratings

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by GuyL, Apr 25, 2002.

  1. GuyL

    GuyL Extra

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    On the Paradigm website, two sensitivity ratings are listed for their speakers. Anechoic and in-room. Which rating should I be looking at when comparing to other brands? Trying to determine how sensitive the Studio 20's are compared to other speakers.
     
  2. GabrielC

    GabrielC Stunt Coordinator

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    I could be wrong, I don't know if there is a standard in-room test size, so you might be better off to go with anechoic if it's available, where there is no sound reinforcement from the walls. It should, in my theory at least, give a more accurate number. This number is usually lower than the in-room sensitivity if I'm not mistaken. Can anybody verify?
     
  3. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

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  4. Evan S

    Evan S Cinematographer

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    I believe Paradigm provides the Anechoic DB rating just for reference. When comparing, I would use the in-room measurement seeing as not one of us actually lives in an anechoic chamber. That's the real world rating...the in-room one.
     
  5. Harold_C

    Harold_C Stunt Coordinator

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    The so-called anechoic rating would be more directly comparable to the sensitivity ratings given by other loudspeaker manufacturers.

    No way is a Paradigm getting an honest 94 db/1 watt/1 meter efficiency. Not going to happen with a small bass driver, dome tweeter, reasonably accurate loudspeaker.

    I wouldn't pay much attention to efficiency ratings. They are useful as a rough guide to help calculate how much amplifier power you will need to achieve Dolby reference levels (or some level a known amount below that). But, they don't mean anything at all in terms of comparing the quality of two loudspeakers and they are inherently not that precise a measurement.
     
  6. keir

    keir Stunt Coordinator

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    i think an anechoic sensitivity rating is pretty precise. every variable is controlled. theres no reflections of sound, the voltage and distance from speaker are given. other manufacturers that i have seen usually dont say whether its anechoic or not, meaning its probably an in-room number.
     
  7. GuyL

    GuyL Extra

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    QUOTE]I wouldn't pay much attention to efficiency ratings. They are useful as a rough guide to help calculate how much amplifier power you will need to achieve Dolby reference levels (or some level a known amount below that). But, they don't mean anything at all in terms of comparing the quality of two loudspeakers and they are inherently not that precise a measurement. [/quote]

    The speakers I have now are rated at 90db which I'm pushing with an 60wpc H/k 310. I am wanting to upgrade the speakers with some that that are close to 90db or greater. I was looking at the Studio 20's which are spec'd at 89 and 86. I wasn't sure which spec to go by for comparison. I don't want a speaker that's 4db less efficient thank what I have now because I don't want to strain my receiver to play loud.
     

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