Panasonic + Widescreen + Tweaks = confusion help!!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Eliot.T, Aug 10, 2002.

  1. Eliot.T

    Eliot.T Auditioning

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    Hello,

    I am in the market for a new TV. I thought I'd finaly take the plunge and get a RPTV. I was looking at the 47' Panasonic 16:9 HDTV. From looking at many posts from other people asking about what type of TV to get I noticed this unit being highly regarded.

    Well, I have a few questions about this set and about home theatre in general. First question is if I should worry about "burn-in". I was reading posts and noticed alot of people talking about this, how exactlly should I go about preventing this when I first recieve my set?

    I don't have a progressive scan DVD player, but I do use component outputs. Is the TVs progressive scan mode good enough or would it be worth buying a dvd player that does its own progressive scanning?

    I notice alot of you saying that the 47WX42 TV is very "tweakable" what exactlly do they mean by this? I noticed a person's post where he said the TV does not look very good out of the box, but with an ISF(?!?!?) calibration it looks really good. What is an ISF calibration?

    I guess that is all the questions I can think of. Planning on not spending more then 2k on the TV, so if anyone else has more suggestions they are welcome.

    Thanks.

    Eliot
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    • Burn-in would be an issue if you plan on watching a lot of 4:3 material--the same way it's an issue when watching lots of 16:9 programming on a 4:3 set: Uneven wear of the CRT phosphors will result. You can mimimize the chances of this happening by reducing the contrast and brightness levels much lower than the factory default settings.

    • Using a progressive-scan DVD player's deinterlacing processing almost always works better than using the monitor's internal line-doubler, resulting in more artifact-free images. This is not always the case, but for the most part it is. The deinterlacing functions in a good prog-scan DVD player are almost always better performing than a monitor's ability to deinterlace the signal.

    • ISF = Imaging Science Foundation, an organization founded by video maven Joe Kane, which has several member dealerships and individual, professionally trained calibrationists who can tweak a video display far better than mere mortals. HTF administrator Gregg Loewen is an ISF-certified calibrationist.

    A set as sophisticated as the Panasonic requires a professional calibrationist to perform anywhere near its potential. Even at it warmest color-temp setting, the Panny averages close to 10,000 degrees Kelvin at all brightness levels out of the box. Only a trained professional has the tools to massage the set's grayscale to produce a truly accurate picture with accurate colors.

    You should factor in an ISF calibration to the total cost of the Panasonic. It's worth it--I've seen what that set can do when it's calibrated properly.
     
  3. Eliot.T

    Eliot.T Auditioning

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