Panasonic RP56 and Onkyo 595 hook up and settings help...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Johnston, Dec 17, 2001.

  1. Bill Johnston

    Bill Johnston Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I just got the following (Onkyo 595, Panasonic RP56, Jamo 310 Bundle)... and just set it up yesterday... Now... I want to make sure that everything is set up so it sounds near perfect... I does sound great but when watching a DVD i noticed that i have to have it cranked up to 48 to 54 to get any real sound... I have the DVD hooked up using a digital wire (what are they called again)... and have the DVD set to OPT 1... Speakers set to small... sub on...

    It defiantly rumbles!!!

    Can anyone recommend the best settings? I noticed that i could only set the DSP to Dolby D, and Sterio... Is this fine? I left it set to Dolby D...

    What about the panasonic? What should I set the sound to? surround? etc?

    How should i calabrate the speakers?

    Thanks for any suggestions and advice...

    Bill
     
  2. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    Some people aren't used to the exponential function thats found in the Onkyo's volume control. The volume is incremented in units of 1dB. And I believe that the max volume is 75dB unless you select a custom max volume setting. So if you're listening at setting of 50 then its only putting out 1/316th of the voltage and power that it would put out at 75. That's right, 316 times less.

    Of course, there's no telling if the receiver would actually survive at a setting of 75. But its reasonable to assume it would survive at 65, possibly 70. And that's still 32 to 100 times more voltage and power than at 50. So my point is that at a setting of 50 you're not even beginning to strain the amp or power supply.

    You should be able to select Stereo, Direct, ProLogic 2, TV Logic, Hall, and all those other matrixed/decoded soundfields at any time. Dolby Digital and DTS will only be available when the DD/DTS audio track is available on the DVD and that track is selected.
     
  3. Bill Johnston

    Bill Johnston Stunt Coordinator

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    So, Right now I have the Digital Out from the Panisonic DVD into the Digital In #1 (the ones that look like phone jacks)...

    I was watching Gone in 60 seconds... and I could only select Sterio, and Dolby D...

    What's up with that... Did I select somthing wrong?

    Also, you guys should note... I took the analog out's from the DVD and plugged them into the CD IN's... This way I can watch Hippie TV (watching TV and Playing music), and Playing playstation while listening to music... Is this a problem?

    Thanks again!!!

    Bill
     
  4. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    If you're able to get Dolby Digital decoding to work, then you've got it connected up just fine. I really don't know why you would want to listen to matrixed/simulated surround format when a discrete one is available. I haven't tried to force PL2 or Hall or TV logic if DD is available. But I think you should be able to do this using the following buttons on your remote:

    4 (surr)

    3 (DSP>)

    6 (DSP
     
  5. Mike__D

    Mike__D Supporting Actor

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    I've listened to Stereo and DPLII with the volume at 65 for extended periods (I was in another room), and the 595 held up fine.
     
  6. Bill Johnston

    Bill Johnston Stunt Coordinator

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    But really... I was sitting in the room... Shouldn't 45-50 be LOUDER? Is there a way to calabrate it?

    Thanks!

    Bill
     
  7. Nick G

    Nick G Stunt Coordinator

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    Check the "intela volume" or something like that on the Onkyo. It restricts the volume when it is on.

    Nick
     
  8. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    Sure, there's a way to calibrate it. You'll need a $30 sound level meter from Radio Shack and a test DVD like Avia or Video Essentials. You could use the THX Optimode thats a feature on several DVDs, but I found that when I use the THX Optimode on my Toy Story 2 DVD my surrounds are 2dB louder than the other speakers. Otherwise its levels are like Avia.

    If the only problem is that you think 45-50 should be louder then try this:

    Run up the volume to about the maximum level you'd ever want to use. Listen to the sound quality. If there's no clipping (and if you're not deaf) then there's no problem. The receiver has all the juice you'll ever need. Who cares if 45 doesn't seem loud enough. The number on the display is irrelevant. If you want it louder ... turn it up!

    Onkyo could have chosen to label their maximum (or near-maximum) volume as 0dB and then as you turn the volume down it would get more and more negative. Denon and several others do this and nobody ends up complaining that -20dB just isn't loud enough. But for some unknown reason, Onkyo decided on a 0 to +75dB scale. If you're listening at 50 then (assuming you have nominal intellivolume and speaker level settings) you're probably using about 1 or 2 percent of the receivers power potential. If you're listening at 60 then you're probably using about 10 or 20 percent. If you're at 65-70 then you're pushing its limits ... and likely going deaf.
     
  9. geoff dixon

    geoff dixon Agent

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    I have an Onkyo 595 and your comments are noted re the volume control, When I first got this receiver I thought the volume control was having to be cranked a lot higher on DVd playback, I have been checking this obsevation, Dynamic range of Dvd {quiet to loud} need to be observed, some transfers are quite silly with normal dialogue and high level surround, and just a load of excessive noise, I find the compression of DVD audio makes my Onkyo sit at around 36 with a 10 db intellvol set up, I have been told to ignore the 1db steps of volume unit, mind DTS music finds a lower level at 24 0r lower, try "The Who Live At The Albert Hall" set at DTS you will have the volume set to 3 or 4.

    Try to set up your system with a sound level pressure meter. its the only way to get the balance correct,

    I find the Onkyo A very competent performer although DLP2 doesnt have the extra Dimension and Panaramic settings

    found on higher priced models, which makes this feature limited, DVD appears to want higher volume settings to listen to them I find this quite irritating, some are good vol and some are down, video compromise. extra room etc , who knows they will tell you anything, just crank the volume

    You will hit 79 max, and say whow! I should have got the 100watt model, Try living with some one who doesnt like Home Theatre and continues to watch TV with the grotty internal speakers, you have to keep the volume down or get a divorce. I find it a luxury these days to listen to my system without being nagged to turn it down.good luck.
     
  10. Ryan Schnacke

    Ryan Schnacke Supporting Actor

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    Yes, intellivolume is nice for levelling the volume between sources. I don't have a DVD-A player so I haven't experienced the volume variations on them. But I find that with DVD's I consistently prefer to listen at 8 to 13dB below reference for a nice theater-like performance.

    Moving from 75watts to 100watts will gain you about 1 and 1/4 dB. Imagine how much louder it gets when turning the volume knob up 2 units. The extra 25watts would not even gain you that much difference. If you're really after a lot more volume then it would be wise to get some really sensitive speakers - Klipsch for instance.
     

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