Painting paneling, or...how to de-70's a house?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by David Lawson, Sep 8, 2003.

  1. David Lawson

    David Lawson Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2000
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    Real Name:
    David Lawson
    I'm not intrepid enough to see what's under the paneling in my newly-purchased house (built in the 30's, remodeled in the 70's), so I've decided to just paint the paneling instead.

    Has anyone done this before? I've found a number of articles online dealing with all of the recommended steps (deglossing, sanding, etc.), but I haven't spoken with anyone who has experience in actually doing it.

    I do plan on keeping the grooves between panels, so there will be no tape or mud involved. I'll just paint the grooves in a slightly darker color than the panels to achieve a pinstripes look, which will save me a bit of work and (hopefully) result in an...um..."interesting" design.

    Any tips or warnings would be appreciated. No drywall suggestions, please. I'm too cheap and lazy for that, but not lazy enough to half-ass painting what's already there. [​IMG]
     
  2. Henry Gale

    Henry Gale Producer

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 1999
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    David,

    There are different types of paneling. Whadda ya got?
    If it's real wood, well you'd probably just want to enjoy it.
    Vinyl on hardboard? A whole other process would be involved in painting that.
    Painting the grooves a darker color? That's sounds a bit tedious and might look ghastly awful.
    Per your instructions, I won't say anything about Sheetrock. But, what about exploring under an out of the way panel? If they're NOT attached with construction adhesive, popping them off and painting whatever is underneith might be a lot easier to deal with than painting paneling.
     
  3. Bob Graz

    Bob Graz Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2002
    Messages:
    798
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I agree, don't paint the grooves a different color. Don't know what the surface of your paneling is, but you probably just want to prime and paint a neutral color.
     
  4. Nathan*W

    Nathan*W Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2001
    Messages:
    1,081
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    110
    Real Name:
    Nathan
    Two rooms in my house were paneled and I painted them. You don't need to sand, degloss, etc. DO buy a SEALER/primer though. Kilz is an example. It will prevent any paneling stain from leaching through the paint later on. Prime, caulk as needed, and top coat. BTW, painted paneling looks great.
     
  5. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2002
    Messages:
    1,994
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sometimes ya gotta think outside the box.

    As a kid I had a photo-mural for a whole wall. My father was reluctant to paste it directly on a textured wall. His solution may work for you also. Best of all, it can be easily undone.

    He bought cheap paneling and put it on the wall with the finished side faceing IN.

    The smooth side faced out. There were three seams to seal, which was fairly easy with some patch compound and sandpaper.

    Then he just wallpaper over it with my lunar landscape mural. (complete with the earth setting on the horizon!) - Your tastes are likely differenty than mine were at the age of nine and you may prefer different wallpaper.

    Whatever you do, enjoyand good luck.
     
  6. DonnyD

    DonnyD Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 1999
    Messages:
    1,145
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Being in the remod business, we run into this al the time. As one poster pointed out, you have to prime the paneling very well before you paint it.
    There's several products that will do a good job for ya. Kilz -original oil based- is probably the best known and is preferable over the other Kilz products if odor during the priming process is not a problem. Porter Paints, Owned by PPG, has a couple of products that are actually made for priming paneling also. If you know your paneling is wood veneer, then no test is required but if it is vinyl coated masonite or anything like that, you'll need to test a spot to make sure the paneling surface does not "lift" which would be evident after a thorough drying of the primer.

    That being said, some prep work is essential before you prime. Use some TSP paint prep/cleaner to wipe the paneling first. This will remove the oils and other contaminants that may interfere with adhesion of your primer and paint. TSP is readily found at Lowes, HD, or any paint store and is easy to use and does NOT have to be rinsed off.
    After a good coat of primer, just caulk any seams or areas that show up. Now test an area for bleed.... paint your final coat on a small inconspicuous spot and let it dry. Check for bleedthrough or discoloration. If none is evident, continue with final coat. If beedthrough is evident, you'll have to prime again.
    Bleed through may occur if your paneling has been cleaned or treated occasionally with liquid gold or some other moisturizing product that has really sunk in. The TSP will remove most but if it was really saturated, it could bleed through. Most people do not use Liquid Gold enough to do this but is worth a mention. We ran into bleed at a church where a little old lady caretaker "religiously used" Liquid Gold monthly.
    Painted paneling can look very good and there's a lot of options for the final finish that can really look good. Several texture types and faux painting can minimize the grooves and some can emphasise them. Good luck and I hope I made it a little simplier for ya.
     
  7. James Edward

    James Edward Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2000
    Messages:
    855
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Several friends had to do what you are doing also. As someone stated, painted paneling does look good. I would also back the opinions NOT to paint the grooves a different color.
    And this may be preference, but both friends used flat paint, which made for quite a nice look. It will understate the grooves, as opposed to gloss, which highlights them.
     
  8. Dave Morton

    Dave Morton Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2000
    Messages:
    753
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Real Name:
    Dave
    I agree that you should probably prime the paneling first. I've seen this done with a light colored paint and it turned out great. It really brightened up the room immensely.
     
  9. David Lawson

    David Lawson Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2000
    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    Real Name:
    David Lawson
    Thanks for all of the replies, and I apologize for the delay. The DSL connection isn't up at the house yet, so I can only post at work, and we were swamped yesterday.

    Unfortunately, I'm not sure what kind of paneling it is. I had already purchased some TSP, as recommended in one of the articles I read online. I'll look for the Kilz stuff as well the next time I go shopping.

    I planned to use flat paint all along. Painting the grooves was intended to offset the fact that they're recessed, since I wasn't sure how obvious they would be. Despite the warnings, I'm still tempted to try it. [​IMG]
     

Share This Page