Painting a flexi rack??

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Troy*H, Mar 23, 2004.

  1. Troy*H

    Troy*H Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey, I am making a flexi rack right now, but I am not sure how to go about painting it. I was thinking about using some type of spray paint because I don't want brush strokes if I use regular paint. What kind of spray would you suggest. The only two brands I have been able to find are rust-oleum(sp?) and krylon. Oh and should I buy a spray primer?

    Thanks
    Troy
     
  2. PhillJones

    PhillJones Second Unit

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    I'd have thought that Enamel Paint will probably be the way to go. I don't think you'll get brush strokes even if you just slap it on any old how with a brush.

    On the other hand, don't mind me, I know nothing.
     
  3. Ron-P

    Ron-P Producer

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    Why not roll it? A 1/4" nap roller will give you a very clean look w/o brush strokes.


    Peace Out~[​IMG]
     
  4. MikeWh

    MikeWh Second Unit

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    Troy-- What parts of the rack are you painting and what are they made out of?

    If the shelves are the "traditional" wood/plywood/MDF, then I recommend spray or roller. I usually use a primer in either case (like Rustoleum's Auto primer; HD/Lowes, light, gray or black, depending on your finish coat). I definitely prime wood that will need to look good. You can also roll on primers, if you like. I usually use Kilz.

    I highly recommend oil-based paints for anything that will hold heavy or heat-producing things (like some HT equipment!) or anything that will need extra durability (like a countertop). If you like black gloss, I really like Krylon High Gloss Black Polyurethane Oil Enamel (KDQ6203). It creates a fairly hard surface after a couple weeks of curing. I believe they have a flat poly, too.

    Spray should also be fine, but for larger, flat pieces (like shelves), some people have a hard time getting a consistent/smooth layer with spray paint. I highly recommend a spray can trigger thingy (sorry, I don't know what it's called. It attaches to the top of a spray can and makes it look sorta like a pro sprayer). Spraying is highly recommended if you want to get the project done quickly. Rolled-on oil paint takes a long time to dry, and heavy things shouldn't be placed on it, until it's had a couple days/weeks to cure. Quick-drying sprays are very handy.

    As for rolling-- I HIGHLY recommend a mini foam roller, although for oils, it's not entirely necessary (oils tend to settle flater than latex, because of the relatively long cure time). Foam rollers can create very small bubbles in the initial finish (after rolling), but you generally get a smoother final finish than fiber rollers, especially with glossy paints or polys. With latex, foam rollers usually create a very mildly bumpy finish, but it's much flatter than with a fiber roller cover. You can get these at HD/Lowes, but I prefer the Rubbermaid ones at WalMart or Target. I suppose either is fine though. They also make a cloth fiber-based mini roller cover, which is nice for other small projects. I use foam rollers on pretty much all my wood projects.

    Finally--- I'm not sure if you are using PVC to cover the threaded rods.... but if you are, you might want to try Krylon's Fusion spray paint. I've been using it on a couple of plastic projects over the last year, and it is EXTREMELY durable, when bonded to plastic. It doesn't require priming, either. I can only seem to find this at WalMart stores. My HD/Lowes don't seem to carry it.

    If the threaded rods are bare... Rustoleum primer, then enamel spray.
     
  5. Troy*H

    Troy*H Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the help guys! BTW this was in regards to the shelves(mdf). I think I am gonna try using a roller. One more question. After I get done putting on the color coat of the paint do I need to put a clear coat over it(gloss).

    Thanks again
    Troy
     
  6. MikeWh

    MikeWh Second Unit

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    Dark gloss finishes are somewhat prone to problems with showing scratches. I used that Krylon High Gloss Black Poly mentioned above on several countertops in my HT. It provides a very nice, hard finish, but is still prone to an occasional light scratch. Polyurethane is what provides the hardness to that paint, so putting another clear poly over it is probably counterproductive. Instead, I'd recommend building up several thin coats of this paint and allowing at least a week before placing anything on the shelves.... and just try not to slide things around on the shelves. [​IMG]

    If you use a latex-based paint, then a couple thin coats of a clear, water-based poly gloss is a very good idea. This is actually a decent alternative to working with oils, if you'd rather not deal with the messy cleanup. Minwax Polycrylic is pretty good. One note about clear polys-- most clear poly finishes eventually start to turn a slight amber color over time. Exposure to UV increases this, so in an HT, I suppose you'll be better off. If it's applied over a dark color coat, then you'd probably never notice.

    I should have also mentioned-- I used to be able to get a fantastic water-based, VERY HARD paint at WalMart. It was made by Red Devil, but I seem to recall having a rather hard time finding it again a couple years ago. It was really a great paint. I painted several pieces of kids furniture with it and that stuff has held up better than most oil projects I've done. I don't see it on their website, so they may not make it anymore.
     

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