Overscan Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by GerardoHP, May 30, 2001.

  1. GerardoHP

    GerardoHP Supporting Actor

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    Gerardo Paron
    After reading a number of commentaries here, I have concluded that my 65 in. Toshiba has a significant amount of overscan. For example, 1.66:1 movies that are enhanced for widescreen TV's like REAR WINDOW fill the screen, the black bars on the side disappearing.
    Is there a more-or-less simple way for me to correct this without incurring another 400 dollar expense?
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    [​IMG]
    Gerardo
     
  2. Ken Seeber

    Ken Seeber Supporting Actor

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    I can't answer your question specifically, but if I were you the first thing I'd do is check just how bad the overscan is to see if it's really a problem. The Avia Guide to Home Theater test disc has test patterns designed specifically for this.
     
  3. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Generally you use service mode menus or screwdriver adjustments (pots) in the rear inside the cabinet to adjust overscan. A very few sets have height and width control you can do from your remote. I don't have specifics for any make or model.
    The height control, sometimes called v-size or vertical size, is also used to make 16:9 mode on a 4:3 TV, assuming it goes far enough without causing geometry or other distortion.
    There is a small chance you will have to re-do convergence if you made a significant change to the overscan.
    Other video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  4. Randy Boecker

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    Gerardo,
    To determine how much overscan you really have, you need to use the Avia Guide to Home Theater or the Video Essentials disc. Bring up the overscan pattern and see for yourself.
    As for the bars disappearing on 1.66 anamorphic transfers, I would consider this normal for a consumer display. Some would argue that if the set is properly calibrated then there should be 0 overscan, but that's really not a practical expectation for most of us. While 0% may look great for DVD's, other source material (particularly broadcast) will look horrible on the edges. It's generally acknowledged that between 3-5% is acceptable.
    I have 3% overscan on my Toshiba TW56x81 (according to Avia), and I see no bars whatsoever on pretty much anything other than 2.35:1 films that are enhanced (anamorphic). For non-anamorphic transfers, the bars are there.
    Sorry if I sound a little blase about the whole overscan thing. While minimal overscan is acceptable, I spent a whole lot of time when I first got my set tweaking this and tweaking that and always trying to get better and better performance out of it. I've been a lot happier (and less frustrated) now that I've set my mindset to just enjoying my marvelous piece of video technology and just dealing with obvious anomolies that really bother me. [​IMG]
    If you do want to fiddle with the overscan, it's the HIT and WID controls in the Service Menu. Keep in mind, though, that if you make changes to these, you will also have to touch up your convergence. It's not a simple matter of shrinking or expanding the screen for an RPTV. The crt's will also then have to be reconverged to the new screen size.
    Sorry I don't have a quick, easy answer for you!
     
  5. GerardoHP

    GerardoHP Supporting Actor

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    Randy, if I understand Toshiba overscan correctly from your reply, I'm with you regarding the anti-aesthetics of reducing overscan at least on that set (you and I appear to have the same model). I am going to try AVIA on mine but I don't think I want to sacrifice the overall look of the picture in the pursuit of the "exact" OAR. So far, I have been incredibly satisfied with the picture on my TV and I wouldn't want to mess with it too much.
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    [​IMG]
    Gerardo
     
  6. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings
    On RPTV's ... if you try to reduce overscan to 0% ... you will find that the geometry problems that show up as a result cannot be fixed. A limitation of the technology. This is why the makers typically choose 5% and leave it at that.
    I looked at my 61" Toshiba's overscan and it is 2.5% on the left and right and 0.5% on the top and bottom. The slight geometry discontinuity makes watching 16:9 DVD's more palatible without down conversion.
    Regards
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    Michael @ The Laser Video Experience
     
  7. TheoGB

    TheoGB Screenwriter

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    Are there many sites that can lead me through my Sony 24" Widescreen's setup menu. I opened it at one point but was (frankly) scared to death of screwing it up.
    For reference:
    My overscan is so bad on the left hand side that the opening credits for almost famous are not boxed by a black border on that side!![​IMG]
    Cheers.
     
  8. Ken Garrison

    Ken Garrison Supporting Actor

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    My POS 1989 Magnovox 25 inch TV's overscan is bad. If there's text at the bottom, it's hard to read because some of it's cut off. Also, if there's a straight line at the top or bottom, it'll be curved. I hate this piece of shit. 2.35:1 movies look like 2.25:1. Wish we can afford a new set. Preferebly a widescreen.
     

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