overscan and the "safe title/action" screen of VE???

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by KevinW, Sep 11, 2001.

  1. KevinW

    KevinW Stunt Coordinator

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    Can someone please explain to me exactly what overscan is? I think it has something to do with the channel logos? I'm trying to use the "safe title/action" screen of VE and my tv service mode to properly calibrate my monitor, but don't understand exactly how it's supposed to look. How much of this screen should be viewable?
     
  2. Brian_J

    Brian_J Second Unit

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    You want to look for 2.5-5% overscan. Look at the numbers. Also, be advised that the VE overscan seems to be off.
    Brian
    ------------------
    Zed's Dead Baby...
     
  3. KevinW

    KevinW Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I thought a regular picture looked off after centering the overscan, but I figured this was my error. I did see somewhere that you should try for 5% on the upper and right side, and 3% on the left and bottom. I guess this is the amount of error in the overscan.
    Can anyone elaborate?
     
  4. Nicole P

    Nicole P Stunt Coordinator

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    I have used VE to calibrate the overscan on my set to approximately 3% on the sides and 5% top and bottom.
    This is because I was setting it for wide movies where the sides have information and the top and bottom only have the letterbox bars.
    The percentage refers to the amount of picture that is off the edges.
    Safe Title/Action refers to the part of the screen that tv directors tend to place the action in. They know about overscan and try not to have important parts of their composition at the extreme edges.
    Finally, dvd players themselves have overscan and I have observed this test screen to shift depending on the player I send it through.
    Cheers,
    Nicole P.
     
  5. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Safe Action Area: The inner 81% of the video frame (area) after trimming 5% off all four sides.
    Safe Title Area: The inner 64% of the video frame after trimming 10% off all four sides. Usually artistic directors keep credits and text within this area.
    Ideally you want to see the entire video frame but... The picture may grow slightly when the overall picture content is bright so you may find it impractical to set overscan to exactly zero without seeing ragged edges come into view in dark scenes. Sometimes the extreme edges are squished and overscan is used to hide that defect.
    Some TV sets come from the factory with ten percent cut off all sides by the picture tube edges, this is way too much overscan.
    Other video terms: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/vidglos.htm
    [Edited last by Allan Jayne on September 12, 2001 at 07:22 AM]
     
  6. KevinW

    KevinW Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm still a little confused. Am I supposed to set it to 0%, 5%, or what? Right now I have it set to 5% on all sides. Is this ok?
     
  7. Richard Kim

    Richard Kim Producer

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    5% overscan is acceptable. If you get it any lower it will cause geometry and distortion problems.
    Also as mentioned before, the VE overscan test is innacurate. The Avia overscan is a much better test to use.
     
  8. Mark Ruszat

    Mark Ruszat Auditioning

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    On Title 17 Chapter 13 of the Video Essentials disk there is an SMPTE pattern that I've used to set the overscan. This yields a 5% overscan on the top and right and a 3% overscan on the bottom and left of the overscan image. This seems to center the picture better than the overscan image.
     

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