Overscan and 16:9 tele's

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Leroy, Jun 25, 2001.

  1. Leroy

    Leroy Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    305
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a Mits 46807 WS set and a JVC PS DVD player. One of the features of the DVD player is a on screen menus that display the movie in a PIP type window while you are fooling with the menu. Thing I noticed is that the pip window shows the full image (1.85 and 2.35). With this I was able to judge how much overscan I had(no, I don't have an AVIA or VE disc).
    My question is how much, if any, image is lost when watching an enhanced 1.85:1 movie at 1.78:1 and where does the loss come from(sides or top and bottom)?
    I even noticed this while wathing The Professional(2.351). When the LEON title comes up the sides a cropped slightly(but in the menu PIP it is fully visible).
    Just curious.
     
  2. Joseph Bolus

    Joseph Bolus Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 1999
    Messages:
    2,441
    Likes Received:
    166
    If you're viewing a 1.85:1 anamorphic transfer, like, say, Cast Away, and you don't detect at least very slight black bars at the top and bottom on your 16:9 set, then your overscan is probably set up at around 3% and you are losing about that much off the edges. (In other words, about 1.5% of the image is being lost from each edge of the transfer.)
    This is fairly typical of today's 16:9 sets.
    If you do see very small black bars at the top and bottom of your 16:9 set while viewing anamorphic 1.85:1 transfers, then you don't have an overscan problem to speak of.
    Joseph
     
  3. Leroy

    Leroy Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    305
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, I'm not really concerned with the top and bottom overscan, since I think I'm right around 2-3%(judging by the menu PIP), moreso the sides. I looks like I'm losing quite a bit, but If I adjust it too much it becomes next to impossible to converge the guns at the far left and right resulting in some interesting rainbows!!
     
  4. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2001
    Messages:
    963
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you can, get Avia and measure the overscan (Avia is a great tool in general to have), it's the best way to quantify how much you have. Around 5 percent on the left and right sides of a set seems the norm today and anywhere from 3-5 percent on the top and bottom. If you attempt to shrink the picture size to reduce it, you may introduce convergence and/or geometry problems on the edges. It's really a case of which one you think is a lesser evil.
    hope this helps,
    --tom
     

Share This Page