"Overload"

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Sean Lowder, Jul 21, 2005.

  1. Sean Lowder

    Sean Lowder Auditioning

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    I have a JVC RX-6042S receiver. When I put it in "DVD" mode and turn the volume up, I get a message of "Overload" and I have to turn it off. In this mode all of my speakers are working including the sub wfr. When I put it in "DVD Multi" mode and turn up the volume, it will play as loud as I want it to, except the rear surround speakers and the sub wfr are not activated. I bought new wires and I still receive the same problem. What is making the amp/receiver overload and how can I fix it?
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    heat? ventalation? Blown driver somewhere?

    Usually a connection issue, but it sounds like you have replaced all the speaker cables.
     
  3. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Speaker cable problems (i.e., a short) will shut down the receiver immediately, so that can’t be it. Since it works fine when only two speakers are used, that tells me the overload light is telling you exactly what’s happening. Are the speakers 4-ohm, or unusually inefficient? Either would probably give you the problem you’re having now.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  4. Sean Lowder

    Sean Lowder Auditioning

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    The speakers are 8 ohm.
     
  5. Brian Fellmeth

    Brian Fellmeth Supporting Actor

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    Try disconnecting each speaker *one at a time) and see if eliminating any particular speaker stops the overload.
     
  6. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

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    Sean, the receiver simply doesn't have a sufficiently capable amp section to handle your speaker/volume needs.

    There are 3 ways to "fix" it.

    1) Replace the receiver with something heftier, for example, an HK 635.

    2) Replace your speakers with something very efficient, perhaps Klipsch.

    3) Keep the volume down to a point that the Overload light does not come on.

    I don't mean to sound flippant, but there is very likely nothing broken in your system. I would check all the speaker wires just to make sure there is nothing amiss.

    Apparently, your receiver simply can't handle 5 speakers going at a good volume at one time. The subwoofer should not make any difference as I would guess it is powered.

    Some receivers rated at 100 watts X 5 end up putting out less than 40 watts when all 5 channels are driven.
     
  7. Sean Lowder

    Sean Lowder Auditioning

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    I tried unhooking each speaker, one at a time and still had the same response. I will take this receiver back and get something a little heftier. Thanks to all that replied to my problem. Have a great weekend.
     
  8. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Look at the speaker wires at BOTH ENDS for your rear speakers. You could have a strand of copper creating a short.

    Check your receiver settings. With a self-powered subwoofer, all your speakers should be defined as SMALL. This will force the receiver to send all low-frequency, and the .1 channel sounds to the subwoofer.

    This removes the power-drain from your receiver.

    Here is the issue: low-frequency sounds take a LOT more power to produce the same volume than higher-frequency sounds. This is why we have lots of self-powered subwoofers, but midrange and tweeters do not need to be self-powered.

    When "The Matrix" came out on DVD a few years ago, we had a flood of people with well-working systems that suddenly started going into "OVERLOAD" after that lobby shoot-out scene. Several minutes of intense low-frequency sounds just over-heated things.

    The solutions were:

    - Turn down the volume
    - Install a self-powered subwoofer
    - Define all speakers as small
    - Increase the vent space around the reciever & install a small fan to keep things cool

    Hope this helps.
     
  9. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

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    Bob

    Nice post.
     

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