Overkill on speaker wire?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by AndrewLevine, May 1, 2006.

  1. AndrewLevine

    AndrewLevine Stunt Coordinator

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    First let me list my equipment:
    -Athena F2.2 (dual 8" floorstanders, 20-100 watts rms, 8 ohms)
    -Harman Kardon AVR 235
    -Digital Coax from computer to receiver
    -Used 95% for music

    I was looking at not spending too much on speaker wires, but I want something that will last, be sturdy, and be able to be used once my system is upgraded.

    My idea for speaker wire:
    -one pair of Blue Jean Cable's Belden 5T00UP (10 gauge, 20ft long)
    -a pair of Blue Jean Cable's locking banana plugs on either end

    My questions:
    1. Is 10 guage too large? (12 guage also available)
    2. At total cost of $48, is this too much to spend on a system valued at around $700
    3. Any suggestions/comments?

    You guys all helped me pick out my equipment so far, and so far I'm happy- I thought I'd continue the trend.

    Thanks for your time,
    Andrew
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    Sounds like a reasonable price. Overkill? Well, a bit, but then you sleep better at night.
     
  3. AndrewLevine

    AndrewLevine Stunt Coordinator

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    My thoughts exactly.

    However does anyone have an opinion one way or another between 10 guage vs 12 guage speaker wire for nearly the same price?

    -Andrew
     
  4. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    impedence vs maximum cable length

    For a 8 ohm speaker, 10 gauge is overkill. Athena does note that the AS-B1-2 only accepts 12 gauge and thinner.

    I realize that you have a different model, and plan to use banana plugs, but it's a sign that perhaps 10 gauge might be wasted, or even (at least when using bare wire) physically incompatible.
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Ordinarily I’d say, “There’s generally no good reason to go with 10 ga.” But if it’s the same price as the 12 ga., I’d say, “Why not?”

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  6. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    You may have a problem fitting 10 ga wires into your reciever or speakers. Many times even good 12 ga is a very tight fit. (oh, but you are getting the plugs so this may not be an issue).

    One speaker web site that was NOT trying to sell over-priced wires suggested the following gauge based on run-length:

    1-10 ft: 16 ga
    11-20 ft: 14 ga
    20+ ft: 12 ga

    Many of us use 12 ga everywhere. I'm not sure the 10 ga would really make a difference (but it would be heavier and harder to work with).

    To avoid over-spending I suggest people budget 10% of the equipment cost for the wires and not go over this amount. Thanks to BJC's prices, you are well below the $70 limit so you are fine.
     

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