Oval DirecTV Dish and adding more Receivers

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Chapman, Feb 18, 2001.

  1. Mark Chapman

    Mark Chapman Auditioning

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    I am new member to this forum and have a question I hope someone can answer.
    I have a Sony DirecTV Oval dish and two receivers hooked up to it. One of those receivers is a Sony DirecTivo. I have one cable running into the room with the DirecTivo. This one line is fine for now, but if and when Sony decides to activate the 2nd tuner in the box I'll need a separate line to feed it. Can I split the signal in the room somehow so I can feed the Receiver two different signals? I'd rather not run an extra line into the room from the dish if I can help it. Plus, I'd like to keep the extra lines from my 2 dual LNB's available for future receives in other rooms.
    Thanks for any help you can give me!
     
  2. John Coleman

    John Coleman Guest

    It is my understanding that due to voltage and other requirements, an LNB signal cannot be split (unless through a multiswitch). You must run one line in from the dish or switch for every DSS tuner you have. However, I am not an expert on this, you might try to post your question over at www.dbsforums.com. I hope that helps.
     
  3. Bob Jackson

    Bob Jackson Stunt Coordinator

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    There are two polarities of signal sent down from the satellite and the home DBS stuffs only send one polarity at a time down the cable. Odd channels are one polarity, even the other typically. With one cable you only get odd or even.
    So you will need a new cable run.
    If that will be a major pain there are ways to put both polarities on a single cable (they do this in a lot of apartments) that you can split with a DBS freq splitter.
    I think the boxes to do this run about $100 per end (three needed in the above example), but I have not seen hard pricing for them and they can be a little hard to find.
     

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