original audio format questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Doug D, Sep 16, 2002.

  1. Doug D

    Doug D Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey all,

    I'm working on an article on 5.1 remixes, and wanted a couple opinions, and also wanted to track down some info.

    1. Is there a list of DVDs that aren't presented in their original audio format?

    2. If you're a stickler for OAR but not original audio format, why do you feel differently about the two?

    3. Has anyone not bought a disc either because:
    a. it doesn't contain the original audio format
    OR, conversely
    b. it doesn't contain a 5.1 remix?

    Thanks, all.
     
  2. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    I'm sure more than a few purist's didn't buy Universal's JAWS DVD because of it's lack of the original Mono track, I wasn't one of them (the 5.1 track sounded fine to me). I guess the same could be said for the Director's version of Superman: the Movie and it's new cut & 5.1 track. I don't have a problem with that one either.
     
  3. Robert Franklin

    Robert Franklin Stunt Coordinator

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    Since no one else is going to respond, I will.

    1. I will tell you that I have just a few DVDs, that doesn't contain the original sound format.

    Here they are:

    Jaws - Mono I have the DTS version

    Species 1 & 2 - In Theaters DTS ONLY!! Available in Dolby ONLY!!

    2. Sound can make you react to what is going on in a film or show. Sound also has in an impact on me because I have been given the gift of playing more than one instrument and I can hear all of the textures that sound can employ. Sight also has an impact on me, because my father is an artist. I love the way a movie is presented in its OAR because it shows everything that the director wanted us to see. There are many wide shots that are in many of the films that I have on dvd that just absolutely beautiful. Sometimes that way the camera moves and just does things that you can't capture with Pan and Scan. Pan and Scan also doesn't capture that grand scope of beauty that widescreen has. That's why I will only buy widescreen movies.

    3. I have bought both movies that contain the original mono, and ones that contain a remix version. If mastered right, the sound can be astonishing. That applies to both Dolby and DTS!!

    RF
     
  4. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    [​IMG] Odd, I thought I did respond.
    If I need to spell it out more clearly, then...
    No. I have never refused to buy a DVD because it didn't contain the original soundtrack.
    Better?
    The question was "Has anyone not bought a DVD because it didn't contain the original soundtrack/format or because it didn't have a 5.1 track?".
     
  5. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

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    I'll only keep from buying a DVD if the remix is done really poorly.

    Some discs with 5.1 remixes from mono I have are... Wizard of Oz, North By Northwest, Snow White, Dumbo, Willy Wonka (LBX SE), Monty Python and the Holy Grail: SE, Airplane!, and I think, The Evil Dead.

    All of them are remixed in a manner of enhancing the sound for modern audiences, but without harming the impact of the sound. Sure, it's stereo surround, but they're all in a way which adds to the presentation quality.

    Some stereo to 5.1 tracks such as Superman, The Elephant Man, Top Secret!, Amadeus, Fantasia, and Close Encounters of the Third Kind are done well, too. They had more to work from due to the extra availible tracks.

    I AM a stickler for OAR (although, I always allow room for filmmaker's alterations like opening mattes or overmatting...being against those is exactly like being pro-P&S.), but new sound mixes should only be avoided if they're done poorly or are not what is intended. Remixes supervised by filmmakers like Superman's or The Evil Dead are not only OK'd, but done well.

    However...I'd avoid discs which remixed tracks which don't need it. Not only does Citizen Kane have a reference quality and perfectly engineered 1.0 mono track...does it really need DTS 6.1 ES? I don't think so. Does an action-filled movie like Superman benifit? Yes!
     
  6. Mattias_ka

    Mattias_ka Supporting Actor

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  7. DeanWalsh

    DeanWalsh Second Unit

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    I think what audio format a film played in theatrically is irrelavant to dvd, for example Species. Yes it was DTS only theatrically but that doesnt mean the mix has changed because it's in DD on dvd, it's still the original 5.1 mix (not taking the usual DD tweaks such as Dialnorm etc into account but thats another story.)
    When you start talking mono to 5.1 remixes and the like, sure it then becomes an issue, but with 5.1 it is largely irrelevant.

    If a film was only released in DD in theaters, then to stick to the same format on dvd would mean encoding it in DD at 320kbps... not a good idea. Remember regardless of the theatrical format 5.1 tracks start out as uncompressed high quality masters which become the basis for the downconversion to DD, DTS, SDDS for theaters and dvd. So in that respect, even the theatrical presentation is an inferior rendering of the original intended mix.
     
  8. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    I listen to original audio and watch in OAR (but see below for exceptions)

    But, (and it’s a pretty big but), filmmakers routinely provide sound remixes and almost never re-release a film in a different aspect ratio. It might be possible to consider a sound remix as something like a “director’s cut”, something that many of us snap up with glee, when they are released.

    The first film, that I really considered ‘improved’ by a remix, was Das Boot, where the director, Wolfgang Peterson has stated that the 5.1 sound provided as alternate tracks on the ‘Director’s Cut” DVD is what he would have done if the technology had been available at the time.

    This has made me rethink my position regarding sound on re-releases.
     

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