Original Apocalypse Now available via programming Redux?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Matt_P, Jun 26, 2002.

  1. Matt_P

    Matt_P Second Unit

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    I finally picked up Apocalypse Now Redux, but haven't been able to watch it yet. However, from the insert, and checking out the menus, it seems that the disc was authored with the new scenes isolated as chapters. If this is so, wouldn't it be possible to program them out with the DVD player's program function, restoring the original cut? I'm familiar with the original cut, but not with Redux yet (I didn't get a chance to see it in the theater). From what I understand, 49 minutes were added, and none removed. Are there snippets of the original interspersed with the new scenes that would prevent this from working?

    If this works, one could theoretically have both cuts on one disc!

    Those familiar with both cuts, please let me know! Thanks.
     
  2. Aaron Reynolds

    Aaron Reynolds Screenwriter

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    The audio is significantly different, in order to more organically transition from "old" scenes to "new" scenes. Also, apparently the film was re-edited from scratch, so shots are not neccessarily in the same order, or held for the same number of frames, or even the same takes (though I didn't notice much aside from the initial cut in the opening montage that was obviously different from the old version when I saw Redux theatrically -- I believe that the differences are subtle).
    One day I intend to directly A/B compare them...but not any time soon. Too many other movies to watch. [​IMG]
     
  3. Bill J

    Bill J Producer

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    I don't think it is possible because as Aaron said a lot of the audio was edited to fit in with the new scenes. Hopefully someday we will get a special edition from Paramount that includes both cuts of the film along with the documentary Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse.
     
  4. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    I think that along with the major new chapters (the French plantation for example) there are also numerous scenes that have either a few new shots and/or the original shots run longer than before. Each shot is kind of short so I doubt that they really did put a new chapter on each individual shot. One scene (I won't spoil it for you) has a new shot which sets up a couple of entirely new complete scenes. The complete scenes might be chapters but I wonder if that one shot can be programmed out.
     
  5. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    I don't see how any of that lame-ass stuff about stealing kilgore's board and the very out-of-character Willard goofing around with the kids material can possibly be removed... as it certainly should be. Hopefully, you can simply bypass the longer added scenes by forwarding with your remote right past them (the French Plantation scene, the Return of the Bunnies scene, etc.).

    If at all possible, get the original cut DVD. Not sure what will become of it ultimately, but Coppola has referred to it as "permanently retired".
     
  6. Damin J Toell

    Damin J Toell Producer

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  7. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    I would hope so, Damin - and I was completely unaware and am now very distressed to learn that the original negative is now as mutilated as the film - but doesn't it ultimately come down to Coppola? I mean, does he own the rights to his film so that he can determine whether and which cut can now be shown and sold?
     
  8. Damin J Toell

    Damin J Toell Producer

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    Yes. Coppola personally owns the rights to the film (or, at least, Zoetrope does, but it's the same difference). So he can control whether the original cut is ever released again on video or if theatrical prints ever get struck again. Of course, however, he has no control over sales of previous video copies of the original cut (e.g., if I sell my DVD on eBay or Best Buy sells old stock) or exhibitions of pre-existing theatrical prints of the original cut that he doesn't own (although it's unlikely that there are many stray 35mm prints that Coppola doesn't own).
    All that having been said, I'm pretty pleased as a general matter that Coppola has sole legal control over his own film.
    DJ
     
  9. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    I'd be pleased to know that the Francis Ford Coppola who made "The Conversation", "The Godfather I", The Godfather II", and "Apocalypse Now" has sole control.

    But I haven't seen him around in years.

    Honestly, I'm not nearly so comfortable knowing that the Coppola who made "The Godfather III", "Jack", "The Rainmaker", "Supernova", and - yes - "Apocalypse Now Redux" is in sole control.

    And possibly in the mood for more tinkerin'.
     
  10. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    My Redux is currently on Ebay. I find the original film hard going as it is (though I must have it in my collection), but the extra 49 minutes (to me, at least) just added superfluous tedium to a film that already felt longer than it actually ran for.
     

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